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10 Real 3D Printing Projects

Clothing

It always stinks when you find a piece of clothing you like and yet it just doesn’t fit you quite right. The waist is saggy or the shoulders too tight. Continuum Fashion has created the N12, a printed, ready-to-wear bikini. The “N” stands for the type of nylon used. With it, Continuum creates a structure of fabric consisting of thousands of tiny circular plates connected by thin strings. The circle size depends on the specific curvature of the person buying the garment and thus customizes the fit.

While the material certainly makes its own statement (like, “Let’s wear Altoids while swimming!”), the longer term implications here are clear: With your measurements in hand (no lying!) you could print off clothing that fits exactly the way you want it to. No more annoying and inconsistent sizes from brand to brand. You just hand the sales associate a file with your sizes and they print off the bikini or dress you want.

If (and when) 3D printers migrate to personal use, you could go shopping from the confines of your living room.

  • mister g
    How many here saw the picture next to the link and clicked it? Not trying to be sexist but honestly how many?
    Reply
  • Tomsguiderachel
    mister gHow many here saw the picture next to the link and clicked it? Not trying to be sexist but honestly how many?Hi There, glad I got you to click. The bikini is a design to be printed on a 3D printer. Amazing, right? I'm sure that's why the organization behind the technology put up a youtube video about the bikini, specifically. Whatever it takes to get people interested in new tech!

    Rachel Rosmarin
    Managing Editor, Tom's Guide
    Reply
  • mister g
    At least this page allows comments, unlike in Tom's Style. I also think 3-d printing is pretty cool, but I got to this page from a little box on Toms Hardware showing articles from sister sites. Keep up the good work though!
    Reply
  • CaedenV
    Man 3D printing has come such a long way! Growing up my dad worked for a recently bankrupt 3D scanning company (great product, poor managers). He would bring home different busts and objects that they messed with on the computer and 'printed' with various types of 3D printers. The best I saw at the time was a mill that actually whittled down a block of wood or styrofoam. The worst were the old level-by-level printers that showed obvious lines between the tiers. But nothing was nearly so smooth and seamless as many of these examples.
    Reply
  • distanted
    I came for the altoid bikini, I stayed for the bone replacement project...that is simply amazing. The plane design concept is pretty cool, too. Hopefully their bikini project turns out better than my Mentos bikini and diet coke pool concept.
    Reply
  • nickallen1984
    For more info about 3D printing and see if you can get something printed for free have a look at www.3dprint-uk.co.uk - it is a very helpful and friendly site with masses of great info! They were really helpful with my project!
    Reply
  • mrmaia
    3d Printing is home industry! Can't wait to see how it will develop over time.
    Reply
  • back_by_demand
    So that's how they made Leeloo Dallas!
    Reply
  • DSpider
    back_by_demandSo that's how they made Leeloo Dallas!Fifth Element.

    Reply
  • JonnyDough
    The chocolate is pretty precise, but it seems as though it could get much more detailed and accurate. Perhaps they need to print it using more viscous (runny) "ink" and apply less at a time.
    Reply