Best all-in-one computers in 2024 - our top picks

all-in-one computer on a table, in keeping with this list of the best all-in-ones you can buy

The best all-in-one computers pack powerful components into a beautiful display, eliminating the need for a separate PC case. They're a great option for anyone that wants the power and utility of a desktop PC, but without the tangle of cables. 

All-in-one desktops are great whether you need a PC for professional use or a basic desktop for your kid's classes and homework. They take up less room than traditional towers, and offer more screen space than even the largest laptops. These unique systems pack their components, ports and monitors into a single unit, allowing you to easily put one on your desk, plug in and get to work (or play).

But you have to choose wisely, because the trade-off for the compact design of an all-in-one is typically the loss of freedom you have to crack open the case and start swapping components out.

To help guide you in the right direction, we've tested many of the top all-in-one desktops (both Windows machines and Apple iMacs) to find the best you can buy.

The best all-in-one computers you can buy today

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Apple iMac M3 review unit on desk

(Image credit: Future)
The best all-in-one for families

Specifications

Display: 24-inch, 4480 x 2520 display
Special Features: 1080p webcam, great speakers, keyboard and mouse included
Processor: Apple M3
Graphics: Apple M3

Reasons to buy

+
Bright, beautiful (and thin) 4.5K display
+
Speedy performance
+
Great audio 
+
Solid 1080p webcam

Reasons to avoid

-
Entry-level model lacks features
-
No vertical height adjustment
-
Ports inconveniently located on the back

The Apple iMac M3 looks an awful lot like its 2021 predecessor, but under the hood this all-in-one is powered by the all-new Apple M3 chip that helps propel it to our top spot on this list.

That cutting-edge slice of Apple silicon gives the 24-inch iMac a much-needed shot in the arm, since the previous model was powered by 2020's Apple M1 chip. That model's still fine for basic work, but the M3 upgrade gives the 2023 iMac more power and more features than before, including upgraded wireless connectivity, better image processing and support for modern graphics tech like hardware-accelerated ray tracing. 

Factor in the iMac's great speakers and beautiful 4.5K display and you start to see why it's so easy to recommend to families, students and teachers.

Read our full Apple iMac 24-inch review.

MSI Modern AM271 M11 on a desk

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best all-in-one for getting business done on a budget

Specifications

Display: 27-inch 1080p (1920 x 1080 pixels)
Special Features: 1080p webcam, keyboard and mouse included
Processor: Intel Core i7-1165G7
Graphics: Intel integrated graphics

Reasons to buy

+
Big, beautiful 27-inch screen
+
Easy to set up and use
+
Takes up minimal space
+
Affordable price

Reasons to avoid

-
Disappointing audio quality
-
Struggles with modern games

The MSI Modern AM271P 11M is an awkwardly-named all-in-one that's quite good if you need something relatively affordable that's capable of tackling the day-to-day tasks of handling business and getting things done.

That's because this $1,200 PC packs a speedy 11th Gen Intel Core i7 laptop CPU into its display along with 16GB of RAM and a 512GB SSD. The fact that it's powered by a top-of-the-line laptop CPU means this MSI can deliver a lot of speed and functionality even though the entire PC is housed inside the display itself. And with its built-in VESA mount, you can set it up on the included stand or mount it on a wall or monitor arm for more convenient workplace setups. Plus, you get a 1080p webcam, keyboard and mouse packed in with every unit -- though all three leave a little something to be desired, so you may want to replace them with your own favorites down the road.

Read our full MSI Modern AM271P 11M review.

Microsoft Surface Studio 2 on a desk in our office

(Image credit: Future)
The best all-in-one PC for artists

Specifications

Display: 28-inch, 4500 x 3000 touch display
Special Features: Pulls down for drawing, included stylus
Processor: Intel Core i7-7820HQ
Graphics: Nvidia GTX 1070

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent design lets you use as a desktop or drawing board
+
Superb display quality
+
Best-in-class pen support

Reasons to avoid

-
Inconvenient port placement
-
Hardware is dated from the start

The Microsoft Surface Studio 2 is the best thing around for anyone who does digital art, thanks to a gorgeous touchscreen that drops down low for comfortable touch and pen use. The better-than-4K display looks amazing, the touch screen supports both the Surface Pen and Surface Dial and the design is top-notch. The design alone would make this the best touchscreen all-in-one for drawing, but the addition of best-in-class pen support takes it upo another level.

The updated Surface Studio 2 gets beefier processing and graphics hardware, switches to all-solid-state drives for storage, and gets an even better version of the PixelSense display that offers enhanced brightness and contrast. It's one of the best all-in-one computers we've seen, and our top pick for media creators and artists.

Read our full Microsoft Surface Studio 2 review.

Dell OptiPlex 7070 Ultra on a desk

(Image credit: Dell)
All-in-one desktop meets mini PC

Specifications

Display: 27-inch, 1920 x 1080 display (as reviewed)
Special Features: Modular design with mini PC and stand
Processor: Intel Core i7-8665U
Graphics: Intel UHD Graphics

Reasons to buy

+
Mini PC meets All-in-One desktop
+
Great performance
+
Excellent port selection
+
Dizzying number of configurations and coverage plans

Reasons to avoid

-
Locks you into a new, untried ecosystem
-
Setup is a pain

Our new favorite office desktop does a cool disappearing trick, with a funky design that hides a powerful mini PC inside a specially designed monitor stand that turns it into a low-profile all-in-one PC. Packing plenty of capability into its tiny size and offering a modular solution for offices that want to upgrade often, the Dell OptiPlex 7070 Ultra is a cool twist on the mini PC in the workplace.

The mini PC itself is so slim it might get mistaken for a laptop battery pack or a desktop dock, but inside it boasts an Intel Core processor, up to 64GB of RAM and as much as 1TB of storage. It has plenty of ports and performance that puts it squarely among the best productivity-focused PCs you can buy – in any form factor.

Read our full Dell OptiPlex 7070 Ultra review.

Apple iMac Pro on a desk

(Image credit: Future)
The ultimate all-in-one computer for pros

Specifications

Display: 27-inch, 5120 x 2880 display
Special Features: Up to 128GB of RAM
Processor: Intel Xeon W processor (8, 10, 14, 18 core options)
Graphics: AMD Radeon Pro Vega 64

Reasons to buy

+
Professional-grade processing and graphics power
+
Enormous amounts of memory
+
Excellent display

Reasons to avoid

-
Not user-upgradable
-
No height adjustment

Editor's Note: Apple has confirmed that it is discontinuing the Apple iMac Pro, and will no longer be selling the system once current stock sells out.

When it comes to all-in-one computers, they just don’t come more powerful than this. The Apple iMac Pro reclaims the Pro title with way more processing and graphics power than any consumer will ever need, making it the perfect addition to the professional video studio, the audio engineering booth or the architect’s office.

Equipped with a 10-core Intel Xeon processor, workstation grade graphics and a mind-bending 128GB of RAM, this machine is pure power. Despite its age, this is probably still the best all-in-one computer for anyone that wants to keep the sleek iMac design, but needs serious power in a workstation.

Read our full Apple iMac Pro review.

How to choose the best all-in-one computer for you

When shopping for a new desktop like one of the best all-in-one computers listed above, it helps to have a clear idea of what your intended uses are for the new system. If you're after a basic machine for web browsing, there are plenty of budget systems that will fit the bill, but more demanding uses like editing photo and video or even creating new artistic content will demand a more powerful system.

For most users, we recommend looking for something with a Core i5 processor or better, with at least 8GB of memory, but more demanding users will want to opt for something more powerful, like an Intel Core i7, and more RAM will translate into faster, smoother operations. You may also want a discrete graphics card if you want to do any sort of gaming or media work.

Storage is also a major consideration. While many of the systems on our list offer 1TB or more of storage, we find that the best option is a dual drive system that offers a larger hard drive for file storage and a faster SSD for storing the operating system and programs.

Touch capability is common on many all-in-one computers, but not on Apple's iMac. If you want touch or stylus support, you'll definitely want to get a Windows machine.

And don't forget about the display. Larger screens are great, but you may get better bang for your buck by focusing on resolution, with 4K displays becoming more common, and some high-end all-in-ones offering even higher resolution options.

All-in-one computers run the gamut from affordable to premium pricing. Budget-friendly systems can be found for less than $1000, but will generally be limited to full HD resolution displays and low-powered Celeron and Pentium processors. The best all-in-one desktops can cost $2,000 or more, and boast 4K displays, the latest Intel Core i7 processors and discrete graphics cards from Nvidia and AMD.

Since these units are always plugged in, you might want to also invest in a good surge protector to make sure your all-in-one stays in good shape.

How we test all-in-one PCs

Every all-in-one we review goes through a variety of benchmark tests in our lab as well as long hours of real-world use. As with our laptop reviews, we use a colorimeter to measure the brightness, color accuracy and color gamut of each all-in-one's display.

For performance, we use the Geekbench 4 test to measure a system's overall processing abilities. We also run a custom spreadsheet test to see how long a PC takes to match thousands of names to addresses. To evaluate each system's hard drive speed, we measure how long it takes to copy 4.97 worth of files.

If an all-in-one has discrete graphics, we run it through many of the same benchmarks we use for gaming PCs. That includes 3DMark Fire Strike, as well as the built-in benchmark tools of games like Rise of the Tomb Raider, Hitman and Grand Theft Auto V. If an all-in-one is made to support virtual reality, we'll also run the SteamVR Performance Test.

Most importantly, we spend a ton of time simply using each all-in-one desktop for everyday activities. We watch movies, do work, play games, and blast music on the speakers, all to get a better sense of which ones are worth your money.

Alex Wawro
Senior Editor Computing

Alex Wawro is a lifelong tech and games enthusiast with more than a decade of experience covering both for outlets like Game Developer, Black Hat, and PC World magazine. A lifelong PC builder, he currently serves as a senior editor at Tom's Guide covering all things computing, from laptops and desktops to keyboards and mice.