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Nanocoating Makes Your Electronics Completely Waterproof

By - Source: Inhabitat | B 31 comments

Your phone can finally be safe from the toilet!

If it hasn't already happened to you, it has certainly happened to somebody you know. Whether its a phone dropped into the toilet or a drink spilled onto a laptop, we have all become far too familiar with the dangers of mixing water and electronics. Some gadgets are engineered to be protected from water damage, but most aren't.

Liquipel Nanocoating

Luckily for all of the poor electronics being soaked in water around the world, Liquipel has created an innovative nanocoating solution that can completely waterproof a large variety of devices, completely protecting them accidental water spills and dips. The nanocoating is completely invisible to the human eye and undetectable to the touch. Unlike bulky waterproof cases, Liquipel's nanocoating is 1000x thinner than human hair, which means it'll basically be impossible to notice while its on your device. The downside to all of this is that you have to send your device in to Liquipel to have it nanocoated. Unfortunately the company is no longer nanocoating devices being sent to them, but we're hoping the technology will be available commercially later this year. Head on over to Liquipel's website for more information and updates.

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Top Comments
  • 11 Hide
    eiskrystal , January 24, 2012 12:56 PM
    So..... how does it protect the connection points? Yknow, the bits most likely to allow water in.
Other Comments
  • 3 Hide
    volks1470 , January 24, 2012 12:41 PM
    That's so awesome i think it's not real....but it is O.o
  • 3 Hide
    hannibal , January 24, 2012 12:47 PM
    The only "problem" with this coating is that it wears out in use, but it still is good addition to the device protection!
    So there is still place "real" robust phones even after this invention. It would be nice to see if and how IP67 compatible device would benefit from nano coating? And does this allso mean that we will get a lot of devices that will offer IP67 compability for short time and lose it after the coating wears of? It could be guite big marketing hoax.
  • Display all 31 comments.
  • -2 Hide
    gogogadgetliver , January 24, 2012 12:47 PM
    Unfortunately the coating can only be applied to materials that are already waterproof.

    Surface repulstion may prevent water from reaching some gaps but you'll still need good old gaskets.
  • -4 Hide
    EDVINASM , January 24, 2012 12:48 PM
    Might be cheaper to back the phone up that Liquasomething it. Next thing in technology news will be invisible rubber band that attaches phone to your face. Once you drop it it simply bounces all the way back. Just to gently remind you. p.s. impact depends on your device weight, has nothing to do with this amazing tech :) 
  • 11 Hide
    eiskrystal , January 24, 2012 12:56 PM
    So..... how does it protect the connection points? Yknow, the bits most likely to allow water in.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , January 24, 2012 1:16 PM
    From Liquipel’s terms of use:
    Liquipel is a unique coating that is meant to protect your electronic device from damage resulting from accidental and incidental exposure to water. WE NEVER SUGGEST OR RECOMMEND THAT YOUR DEVICE MAY COME IN CONTACT WITH WATER OR ANY OTHER TYPE OF LIQUID.
    So it's waterproof - but not for use in the water. Should be great for most of us.

    However, if you are a swimmer or want a true waterproof iPod, there are other companies out there that waterproof electronics. They are not as sexy, no NANO in the name, one example, Underwater Audio (www.underwater.com), uses an innovative process that waterproofs Apple’s iPod shuffle to a depth of over 100ft – designed specifically for swimmers it CAN definitely handle more than “accidental and incidental” exposure to water!
  • 3 Hide
    Motopsychojdn , January 24, 2012 1:16 PM
    I wondered that, obviously its non-conductive too, but I laughed at the disclamer at the end of the video,
    Moto
  • 3 Hide
    mrmaia , January 24, 2012 1:17 PM
    Awesome! Can it be applied to stuff other than electronics as well?
  • 8 Hide
    Lord Captivus , January 24, 2012 1:44 PM
    mrmaiaAwesome! Can it be applied to stuff other than electronics as well?

    What are you thinking about?
  • 9 Hide
    rohitbaran , January 24, 2012 1:58 PM
    edvinasmMight be cheaper to back the phone up that Liquasomething it. Next thing in technology news will be invisible rubber band that attaches phone to your face. Once you drop it it simply bounces all the way back. Just to gently remind you. p.s. impact depends on your device weight, has nothing to do with this amazing tech

    What are you smoking?
  • 0 Hide
    thorimmortal , January 24, 2012 2:45 PM
    Im sure they are using a cvd process, nothing new. more common for making the ic's in the device rather than waterproofing it.
  • 1 Hide
    rjq , January 24, 2012 3:09 PM
    Yes but when are they going to release the Foolproof coating... that would act before you drop your device on water.
  • 5 Hide
    Lewis57 , January 24, 2012 3:12 PM
    I can finally go swimming listening to music?!
  • 1 Hide
    thegreatms , January 24, 2012 3:34 PM


    thorimmortalIm sure they are using a cvd process, nothing new. more common for making the ic's in the device rather than waterproofing it.

    CVD cannot easily get into high aspect ratio surfaces. My guess was that it was ALD or a SAMs coating.
  • 0 Hide
    ajay_vishvanathan , January 24, 2012 4:30 PM
    does it come cheap??
  • 1 Hide
    mrmaia , January 24, 2012 4:42 PM
    lord captivusWhat are you thinking about?


    Whatever is sensible to water, like old paper documents. Floods can be disasterous to register offices, and even though this technique is expensive to use, it could save tons of trouble when the destroyed documents are required.
  • 0 Hide
    blazorthon , January 24, 2012 5:06 PM
    eiskrystalSo..... how does it protect the connection points? Yknow, the bits most likely to allow water in.


    If the device needs to be sent in to get this temporary liquid proofing then I assume they take it apart and coat the internals to some extent.
  • 0 Hide
    jbo5112 , January 24, 2012 5:31 PM
    If it doesn't let me get to my battery, while protecting my battery and everything else, it's pretty useless to me.
  • 0 Hide
    omega21xx , January 24, 2012 5:36 PM
    Correct me if i'm wrong but don't they already have the ability to waterproof the actual board, that way getting water inside doesn't cause a short? Getting water in the lcd would still be a problem unless sealed from the rest of the phone though...
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , January 24, 2012 6:22 PM
    Id be extremely leary about this. Normally harmless materials can be very toxic on the nano scale. A nanoscale layer you are constantly touching/swiping your fingers across could be potentially very harmful to your health.
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