Best TVs of 2024: Tested and reviewed

Samsung S95C OLED TV, the best TV of 2023
(Image credit: Future)

At Tom's Guide, we're always hunting for the best TV. As new models come out, we put them through a rigorous testing regiment, all to help you make the best decision you can possibly make when shopping for a new OLED or QLED TV. We test all the top TVs each year — close to four dozen of them — and these are the 4K TVs that we recommend. 

What are we looking for when we review the best TVs? We want everything that you want: great picture quality, rich sound, easy setup, and all of the smart features available today. We take all those metrics and weigh them against the price of the TV to help you decide what's worth your money.

So what are the best TVs available now? The top spot now belongs to the Hisense U8N, the successor to last year's award-winning Hisense U8K. It faces some stiff competition from Samsung and LG (the LG C4 OLED also has a spectacular screen), but the U8N offers the best price-to-performance ratio. 

That said, the year's not done yet and we're scheduled to get the Hisense UX (2024), TCL QM8 (2024), Samsung S95D and Samsung QN90D in for review soon. With that said, expect this list to evolve in the coming weeks, so keep stopping back to see all the best TVs 2024 has to offer.

To evaluate each TV, we test them in our labs and in the real world, measuring everything from color reproduction and color accuracy to lag time for gaming performance. Plus, we gauge picture and sound quality by watching some of the most popular shows and movies. 

The quick list

Recent updates

What we're currently testing: The Sony Bravia 9 is a mini-LED set that looks to give OLED TVs a real run for their money; we were impressed when we first saw it. The LG G4 OLED crushed our lab tests, so we can't wait to see how it performs during everyday use. Is the Roku Pro Series a better, cheaper version of Samsung's The Frame? We'll find out soon.

About the author

Written by
Nick Pino is the Managing Editor, TV and AV at Tom's Guide
Written by
Nick Pino

My name's Nick and I look after our guides to the best TVs, best OLED TVs and best 4K TVs. I have over a decade of experience covering TVs and AV for major tech publications. Before I became Tom's Guide's Managing Editor of TV & AV, I was formerly the Senior Editor, TV and AV at TechRadar. My accreditations include THX Installation and Calibration training and serving as a Consumer Technology Association panelist for the industry's annual Innovation Awards. Before my days in journalism, I helped folks just like you at a local Best Buy working in the TV department.

How to choose the best TV for you

While the above list can give you an idea of which TVs we feel are the best overall, you'll still need to factor in things like the screen size, the screen brightness, the sound output, the resolution and/or the supported HDR formats you want. An 65-inch OLED might work for most people, but you might want a 50-inch TV that's ultra-bright to compensate for the amount of ambient light in the room, which means an OLED TV might not work for you. 

Need a quick tutorial on TV technology? Here's a short primer.

Screen sizes: This is probably the best place to start when buying a TV. If you plan on wall-mounting the TV, measure the dimensions of the wall space you want to fill. Having the length, width and diagonal measurement will quickly and easily eliminate 80% of the TVs on the market. If you plan on putting it in a cabinet or on a stand, measure the width of where the TV will sit, and use that to start shopping.  

Brightness: The common wisdom for buying a TV is that, the brighter the room is, the brighter of a TV you'll want to buy. Why? Well, ambient light can wash out color saturation or, worse, lead to glare on the screen. Ultimately the amount of glare will depend on what type of TV you buy (OLED TVs with a glass screen are more reflective than, say, QLED TVs with an anti-glare screen), but a good rule of thumb is that OLED TVs are usually better in light-controlled rooms while bright LED-LCD TVs work better in brighter rooms with more ambient light.

Panel type: Panel technology changes all the time, but it broadly falls into two categories — self-emissive displays like OLED and QD-OLED and backlit screens like Mini-LED, QLED and LED-LCD TVs. OLED screens offer better color saturation and contrast, but pixel degradation can be an issue. LED-LCD TVs are often very bright, but they can suffer from something called Dirty Screen Effect (DSE) where each pixel's colors are slightly different, leading to non-uniform images.

Resolution: Unless you're buying a small TV (less than 40 inches) you really want a 4K resolution. Resolution defines the number of pixels on the screen. The more pixels (and the better the processor), the clearer the overall picture looks. All TVs will either offer HD, Full HD, 4K or 8K resolution. 

Refresh Rate: If you've ever looked at a TV box, you'll probably see some weird marketing terms like Motion Rate 240 or 480, or something ridiculous. These don't mean anything. Well, they do, sort of - but it's purposely obfuscated. All TVs available right now have one of two native panel refresh rates: 60Hz or 120Hz. These numbers tell you how quickly a TV scans and replaces each pixel in a second. 60Hz is 60 times in one second. 120Hz is 120 times in one second.  You want a higher number if you want smoother motion (i.e. you plan on watching sports or playing games).  

Ports: We generally recommend opting for more ports, so that you never have to manually unplug and re-plug HDMI cables to switch from your streaming device or Blu-ray player to your game console or other device. Three ports is common, but nicer TVs usually have 4 HDMI ports. You'll also want make sure at least one is HDMI 2.1; our guide to the best HDMI 2.1 TVs can help here. (Still confused? Check out TV ports explained: What all those HDMI, USB and other connections are for?)

Smart software: Almost all TVs are smart TVs these days. That means they come stocked with some sort of smart platform, whether it's Roku TV, Google TV, WebOS, Tizen or something else. Each one has its own strengths and weaknesses, so be sure to familiarize yourself with them before you buy.  

Price: Lastly, you'll need to factor price into the equation. For the most part, unfortunately, better TVs do cost more. Just like PCs, TVs that are more expensive come with better specs and more features, so typically paying less for a TV means making some sort of sacrifice. The good news? You can find smaller 4K TVs (42-, 43- and 50-inch TVs) that sell for less than $500, which will spare you some cash for some of the best soundbars or best streaming devices to go with your set.

The best TVs you can buy today

Why you can trust Tom's Guide Our writers and editors spend hours analyzing and reviewing products, services, and apps to help find what's best for you. Find out more about how we test, analyze, and rate.

Best TV

A cutting-edge Mini-LED TV that can be had for less than $800

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 75, 85 inches
Screen Type: Mini-LED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI (2 HDMI 2.1)
Size: 57.2 × 35.9 × 14.8 inches
Weight: 56.2 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Bonkers brightness
+
Google TV 
+
Built-in ATSC 3.0 tuner
+
Under $1,000

Reasons to avoid

-
Only 2 x HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Upscaling / color banding
-
Color accuracy needs tweaking
Buy it if

✅ You want a Mini-LED TV for its performance: Its peak brightness exceeds any TV around that price, and its color reproduction is as good as some of this year’s best TVs. 

You use Google devices and services: Google TV is smart and well-rounded, especially for those in Google’s ecosystem, and who already use services like Google Assistant.

✅ You want a TV with good sound: Audio performance is a lot like the HDR performance — it’s great. The U8N's 2.1.2 speaker system is plenty powerful for most medium-sized living rooms.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You care about color accuracy: Unfortunately, you'll need to do some calibrating to get the most accurate color as its out-of-the-box settings are slightly oversaturated.

❌ You want the best AI upscaling tech: Hisense really nails the hardware side of things, but its upscaling and motion processing algorithms aren't as good as Sony's, LG's or Samsung's.

❌ You're a console gamer and want a future-proof TV:   Currently, the U8N offers enough HDMI 2.1 ports for both the PS5 and Xbox Series X consoles. But down the road, as more consoles, PCs and media players need HDMI 2.1 ports, you're going to have to make some decisions which systems connect to which HDMI ports.

The bottom line

📺 The Hisense U8N ULED is the TV that I'd recommend to friends and family. It's not only one of the most colorful TVs we’ve tested, but with a peak brightness clearing over 3,000 nits, it's one of the brightest, too. There are better TVs out there, but they cost two to three times as much. ★★★★

What you need to know
It's not shocking to us to see the Hisense U8 series at the top of our list — its predecessor, the Hisense U8K, held this spot for most of last year. But what makes the Hisense U8N even better than its predecessor is the uptick in brightness. This TV can output over 3,000 nits in HDR, which means you're more than covered if you feel like TVs often look too dim and are hard to see. Its color vibrancy is also off the charts, second only to a Sony TV that costs three times as much money. 

In short, the U8N offers performance we'd expect from a $2,000 TV for under $1,000. 

So why doesn't it get a perfect 5 out of 5 score from us? Well, two reasons. For one, Hisense just can't compete with Sony, Samsung and LG in post-image processing. Motion processing and upscaling aren't awful, and most of the time look really good everything considered, but other companies' processing techniques are on a whole different level. You're also stuck with just two HDMI 2.1 ports here.

Despite these flaws, most folks are going to be blown away by this TV.  

Design: For our tests, we used a 65-inch model. At 56.2 pounds, it's not the lightest TV nor the thinnest, but that's to be expected from any non-OLED TV. To mount, make sure you grab a standard 600 x 400, M6 VESA mount. If you want to simply place it on top of an entertainment center, you can do that using the two included legs that come in the box. 

Performance: You can't watch the Hisense U8N and not be impressed. Not only does it nail the perfect brightness in every setting thanks to the incorporation of a light sensor, but its color vibrancy is next level. In our lab tests, conducted by Tom's Guide's Head of Testing Matthew Murray, the Hisense U8N was able to go toe-to-toe with the much more expensive LG C4 OLED and even surpasses it in some key metrics like SDR brightness and color saturation. It cannot be understated how impressive this is. 

The only reason we can't give it full marks are because of its upscaling and motion processing prowess. It's not bad by any stretch of the imagination, but actors' faces on the Hisense U8N might look a bit softer with hidden pores and clouds have soft edges rather than any real definition. Its lackluster motion processing can also create motion blur around the moving objects that's extremely noticeable, even to the untrained eye. Finally, serious gamers might also notice the smallest bit of latency. Anything under 20 milliseconds is nearly imperceptible to the human eye, but there are other TVs that have a hair less input lag for a slightly more responsive feel.

Smart TV: We genuinely like Google TV as a smart platform and we think you will, too. It does a phenomenal job at surfacing new and recommended content for you to watch and it has access to all the main streaming services. Even better, it doesn't really push you to use one service over another the same way an Amazon Fire TV might. The only potential issue is that you might notice a bit of a slowdown when you switch from one streaming app to the next.  

Read the full review: Hisense U8N Mini-LED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceStrong performance for the price.★★★★★
DesignA great-looking TV but not OLED-levels of thin.★★★★☆
PerformanceShows and movies give off a serious ‘wow’ factor.★★★★★
Smart TVThe best smart TV operating system on the market.★★★★★

Best OLED TV

Samsung dethrones LG as the top OLED TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1 (1 eARC)
Size: 56.8 x 32.7 x 0.4 inches
Weight: 41.7 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
One Connect box for cable management
+
Impressive brightness
+
Works as a SmartThings/Matter controller

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision
-
Built-in audio is average
Buy it if

✅ Outstanding brightness: The S95C’s peak brightness of 1,370 nits puts it solidly in LED territory.
✅ Great for gamers and sports fans: 120Hz native refresh rate with four HDMI 2.1 ports makes this great for both gamers and sports fans alike. This set pairs well with the PS5 and Xbox Series X.
✅ Neural Quantum Processor 4K: Samsung's top processor provides excellent upscaling of HD content to Ultra HD, along with great motion processing.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You care about Dolby Vision: Dolby Vision is, by far, the best HDR format. It's tuned to match the brightness and black levels of each individual scene, so not having it on a TV this nice is a bummer.

❌Sound quality is lackluster: With a picture so phenomenal, it's a bit disappointing that the sound isn't as jaw-dropping. It's not bad, certainly, but it lacks refinement.

The bottom line

📺 The Samsung S95C OLED is a jaw-dropping TV. If you have the money to buy one of the best TVs out there, the Samsung S95C deserves a look as it takes QD-OLED to new heights. ★★★★★

What you need to know
Samsung's return to the world of OLED TVs has been a wild ride. It was one of the first manufacturers to make an OLED TV before dejecting the technology in place of QLED. Now, with the S95C OLED, Samsung proves it can do both perfectly. 

Not only is its picture performance simply stunning, but when you’re not watching or using the TV, Ambient mode takes over and provides a carousel of aesthetically-pleasing animations and images. We wish Samsung would implement Dolby Vision and maybe pump up the sound quality a bit more on the S95C, but overall, it's still an incredible QD-OLED TV.

Design: The Samsung S95C is a premium model, through and through. It uses metal materials, a bezel-less screen and has an impressively thin panel. It’s even thinner than the S95B, measuring a mere 10mm thick. If you like your TVs slim and sleek, but still able to fit on a home entertainment center with ease, the S95C's design is top notch. In terms of ports, the S95C has four HDMI 2.1 ports plus an ATSC 3.0 tuner.

Performance: Our reviewers loved the picture of the Samsung S95C OLED, citing its nuanced HDR performance, out-of-the-box color accuracy and wonderful black levels. In our tests, the S95C was able to reproduce about 141.5% of the Rec 709 color space in standard mode and a Delta-E accuracy score of 1.4 (with closer to 0 being best) in Filmmaker mode. For gamers, the S95C measured an excellent 9.2ms lag time, the lowest input latency of any TV we tested, and the set’s off-angle viewing is better than most, with the colors holding up well past the ideal 45 degrees. 

Smart TV: Samsung's Tizen OS is a bit of a mixed bag this year. It can be difficult to navigate (especially if you wan to make tweaks to your picture settings), but you can still find all the major streaming apps, plus plenty of free content from Samsung TV Plus. On the plus side, the S95C can act as a SmartThings hub. If you’re growing your smart home or embracing the Matter smart home protocol, this TV control all of your devices, even if your home uses gadgets from all different manufacturers. 

Read the full review: Samsung S95C OLED

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceA little pricey, but well-worth the cost of entry.★★★★☆
DesignA familiar, yet stunning piece of hardware.★★★★★
PerformanceBetter and brighter picture than previous OLEDs.★★★★★
Smart TVTizen can be a bit finnicky. ★★★☆☆

The best value TV

Our bargain pick is an excellent, affordable QLED with Google TV

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 65, 75, 85, 98 inches
Screen Type: QLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI (1 eARC)
Size: 56.9 x 32.6 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 50.1 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Extraordinary brightness
+
Numerous gaming features
+
Google TV smart platform

Reasons to avoid

-
Mediocre sound
-
Picture quality dips in some situations
-
No ATSC 3.0 tuner
Buy it if

✅ You want a cheap TV that still looks good: For the best smart TV experience in a TV under $1,000, it's hard to deny that the TCL QM8 is the best option around.

You demand good image quality: This TV offers better color, brightness, and shorter lag times than the previous Roku model. Color reproduction was an impressive  99.97% of the Rec 709 color space.

✅ You want a TV that comes with Google TV: It's also snappy, offering noticeably quicker and smoother operations than other platforms, including the sometimes slow Roku TV software that many TCL smart TVs use.

Don't buy it if:

❌ You sit off-axis to the TV: You want to be sitting head-on with this TV. Sit too far off to one side, and you're going to lose a significant amount of color saturation.

❌ You want great-sounding audio: The TV is only outfitted with a pair of 8-watt speakers that merely offer passable stereo sound and decent volume. You might want a good soundbar.

You need more than two HDMI 2.1 ports: Although it has a refresh rate of 120Hz, only two of its HDMI ports offer full-spec 2.1 compliance for 4K/120fps gameplay.

The bottom line

📺 The TCL QM8 Mini-LED TV is a solid upgrade on the beloved 6-Series, and it deserves its spot on our list for offering incredible performance for a very reasonable price. ★★★★

What you need to know
It was a really close call between the Hisense U8K and the TCL QM8. Both TVs are extraordinary values for the money, and while we do think the Hisense U8K is the overall better pick, the TCL QM8 deserved a spot on our list as well. Like the Hisense U8K, the QM8 uses Mini-LEDs for better backlight control and quantum dots to enhance contrast and color. With up to 2,300 local dimming zones and TCL's High Brightness Ultra Direct LED backlight, you're going to get unbelievable contrast for an LED-LCD TV. We also really like the AIPQ Engine Gen 3 that helps upscale HD/SDR content for the QM8's 4K screen as well as the TV's numerous gaming features.

The only major drawbacks here are the TV's 8W speakers that can feel a bit underwhelming and the lack of an ATSC 3.0 tuner that can be found in the Hisense U8K. The latter isn't a deal-breaker, especially if you don't plan on using a digital antenna, but it's absence is still felt here.

Design: The QM8 may not have the beautiful slim design of the LG G3 OLED, but it's certainly not a bad design, either. Its minimal bezel that measures in a less than an eighth-inch on all sides maximizes screen real estate. Beneath the bottom of the screen are physical controls as well as a switch for turning on or off the far-field microphone. The TCL QM8 offers four HDMI ports, however only two of them are HDMI 2.1-compliant, meaning you'll have to choose which devices can pass 4K/120Hz signal and which ones can't. 

Performance: The QM8, like the U8K, is a good pick if you need higher-than-average brightness to combat ambient light. In our testing, the TCL QM8 was able to hit 1,348 nits in Movie mode with SDR content, a significant increase over other 4K HDR TVs that we've measured. With HDR content, the QM8 was able to hit above 2,000 nits in a 5%, 10% and even 25% window sizes. This brightness paired with the Mini-LED backlight offers great contrast that approaches OLED levels. Colors are vivid as well, with our tests showing that the QM8 can cover 80% of the BT2020 color spectrum. Just like the U8K, however, its out-the-box color accuracy leaves a lot to be desired with a Delta E score of 4.4614. With some tweaking, this number can drop significantly, but it's worth noting that some colors might appear a bit oversaturated when you first start it up.

Smart TV: Like a lot of other manufacturers, TCL has shifted to using Google TV in its 2023 models, including the QM8. Google TV is clean and runs smooth on this model, and thanks to the remote's built-in microphone and the TV's integrated microphone, you can search for shows and movies using only your voice. If you want some privacy, you can turn off the voice assistant via a physical switch on the TV itself.

Read the full review: TCL QM8 Mini-LED TV

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Rating scorecard
AttributesNotesRating
PriceGreat value for your dollar.★★★★★
DesignIts basic plastic construction does the job.★★★★☆
PerformanceImproved performance and a strong 4K HDR TV.★★★★★
Smart TVThe best smart TV system on the market.★★★★★

The best QLED TV