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Best Android phones in 2022

Best Android phones
(Image credit: Future)

The best Android phones give you the ultimate choice. Regardless of your budget, you can find a handset to fit your needs, all the way from $1,800 to under $500. You get to pick what features matter the most to you. Don't need a high refresh rate display or telephoto lens? Save some cash.

And now that we're halfway through 2022, a slew of new devices are available with more on the way. We're talking the Galaxy S22, OnePlus 10, and more. We've already seen several phones powered by the new Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 chip, and now some with the Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 chip have started to arrive. That's not to mention Google's second-generation Tensor chip slated to power the Pixel 7 when that flagship arrives in the fall.

Premium Android flagship phones start at $599, offering the sharpest and brightest displays, the most advanced photography, and cutting edge features like reverse wireless charging and screens that can refresh at 120Hz. 5G has also come to more affordable options, like the Pixel 6a, OnePlus Nord N20 and Galaxy A53, so it's nice to see more Android phones able to take advantage of faster download speeds.

Read on to find the best Android phone for your needs and budget. And whichever you buy, be sure to also look at our list of the 25 best apps for your new Android Phone.

What are the best Android phones?

We’ve tested all of the most popular Android phones in all shapes, sizes and prices here at Tom’s Guide. And after all that, the Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra reigns as the best Android phone, thanks to improved cameras and a built-in S Pen. If you can't swing the S22 Ultra's $1,199 price, the Galaxy S22 offers many of the same features for $400 less.

The OnePlus 10 Pro is a compelling alternative to Samsung's flagships, and the newly unveiled OnePlus 10T offers powerful performance at a significant discount.

Still, when it comes to budget buys, it's hard to beat the Pixel 6a, though the Galaxy A53 tries its best to match that midrange phone. Ultimately, cameras carry the day for the lower-cost Pixel, though the Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro impress as camera phones, too.

And if you want to live the foldable life, the Galaxy Z Flip 4 is a great option now with more power and better battery life.

Back to school and best Android phones

While summer is in full swing, school will be here before you know it, which means it's tie to check out the back-to-school sales for deals on all sorts of necessities. That includes the best Android phones, which may see discounts at retailers and phone carriers. Whether you're looking for a new phone before heading off to college or for some other piece of vital classroom tech, follow our back-to-school guide for all of your shopping needs this season. 

The best Android phones you can buy today

Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra is best android phoneEditor's Choice

(Image credit: Future)
The best Android phone you can buy

Specifications

Display: 6.8-inch Dynamic AMOLED (3088 x 1440)
Android version: 12, One UI 4.1
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Gen 1
RAM: 8GB, 12GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB / No
Rear cameras: 108MP (f/2.2) main, 12MP (f/2.2) ultrawide, 10MP (f/2.4) 10x telephoto, 10MP (f/2.4) 3x telephoto
Front camera: 40MP (f/2.2)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 8:50 (adaptive), 10:18 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Faster S Pen built in
+
Super bright display
+
Cameras offer better low light performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Costs more than  $1,000
-
Shorter battery life than S21 Ultra

The Galaxy S22 Ultra is the new king of Android phones. It’s got almost anything you could ever want in a phone, including a built-in S Pen stylus. It’s got powerful cameras, the top-tier Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 processor, plenty of storage options, and a jaw-droppingly gorgeous display. 

The Galaxy S22 Ultra still stumbles in the battery life department, more so than its predecessor. While the phone went for 10 hours and 18 minutes in the Tom’s Guide battery life test, that result was in the 60Hz refresh rate mode. In the 120Hz adaptive mode, the Galaxy S22 Ultra only lasted for 8 hours and 50 minutes, well below some competitors like the iPhone 13 Pro Max (which also features an 120Hz adaptive refresh rate).

But if you’re firmly in the Android camp, there’s no better phone than the Galaxy S22 Ultra right now. You’ll just have to pay $1,199 for the privilege. 

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S22 Ultra review.

OnePlus 10 Pro on bookshelf

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best phone for the money

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch AMOLED (3216 x 1440)
Android version: 12, OxygenOS 12.1
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Gen 1
RAM: 8GB, 12GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 48MP (f/1.8) main, 50MP (f/2.2) ultrawide, 8MP (f/2.4) 3.3x telephoto
Front camera: 32MP (f/2.2)
Weight: 7 ounces
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 11:52 (120Hz), 12:39 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent battery life
+
Beautiful new design
+
Best OnePlus cameras to date
+
Costs less than its predecessor

Reasons to avoid

-
Telephoto is just 8MP

When talking about the best Android phones, the OnePlus 10 Pro is a close second. It’s a beautifully-designed device with a big 6.7-inch AMOLED display and a smooth 120Hz refresh rate. It has the brawn to match its eye-catching body, too, thanks to the Snapdragon 8 Gen 1 processor.

But that’s not all. The OnePlus 10 Pro easily outpaces the Galaxy S22 Ultra in our battery life test at nearly 12 hours in the adaptive 120Hz mode. And with the 65W charging, you can easily top off in no time at all.

The OnePlus 10 Pro also mostly keeps pace when it comes to cameras. Photos often come out nice, though we’ve noticed a slight yellow tinge in certain scenarios. There are a lot of new software features that challenge Samsung’s impressive suite on the Galaxy S22 Ultra. Even so, the Pixel 6 Pro is still the better camera phone. But when it comes down to it, the OnePlus 10 Pro is the better handset.

Read our full OnePlus 10 Pro review.

Pixel 6

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Plenty of smarts at a good price

Specifications

Display: 6.4-inch OLED (2400 x 1080; 90Hz)
Android version: 12
CPU: Tensor
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP main (ƒ/1.85), 12MP ultrawide (ƒ/2.2)
Front camera: 8MP (ƒ/2.0)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 8:13

Reasons to buy

+
Tensor chip adds smarts to the phone
+
Excellent photo-editing features
+
Android 12 is a welcome update
+
Unique design

Reasons to avoid

-
Battery life can be short over 5G

Google’s latest round of phones have easily earned their places on this list. The Pixel 6 is a wholly new device this time around with a fresh design, significant camera upgrades, and the first-generation Tensor chip. All of that comes together in a svelte body that is sure to turn heads. 

This is the everyman’s Pixel this year, coming in at an extremely affordable $599 starting price. While it lacks the telephoto camera and the 120Hz display you’ll find on the Pixel 6 Pro, the Pixel 6 does basically everything you could want an Android phone to do.

If we had to lodge one complaint with the Pixel 6, it’d be the disappointing battery life. In our testing, the phone fared far worse than other phones on this list. Part of that could have something to do with the older 5G modem, since we saw significantly improved results when we were on LTE versus 5G.

Even so, the Pixel 6 sports all kinds of new smarts thanks to the Tensor chip. And at that price, it’s one of the best values on this list (bested perhaps by the Pixel 5a). 

Read our full Pixel 6 review.

Google Pixel 6a review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best Android value

Specifications

Display: 6.1-inch OLED (2400 x 1080)
Android version: 12
CPU: Tensor
RAM: 6GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB / No
Rear cameras: 12.2MP main (f/1.7), 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2)
Front camera: 8MP (f/2.0)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 6:29

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent cameras, especially for the price
+
Bright display
+
Tensor-powered AI features

Reasons to avoid

-
Poor results on our battery test
-
Noticeably cheap materials

Android phone fans looking for a bargain have more choices than ever. Our pick is the Pixel 6a over the Samsung Galaxy A53. While the latter is not without its strengths — see below for more on those — the Pixel 6a’s cameras win the day, as you’d expect from a Google phone.

Thanks in large part to Google’s strengths in computational photography, the Pixel 6a produces outstanding pictures, especially for a phone that costs less than $500. And the 6a is powered by the same Tensor chip found in the Pixel 6, so those AI-powered software features like on-device translation and smart photo editing are part of your budget Google phone as well.

We wish the battery life were better, and Google could learn a thing from Samsung’s generous software update policy, but if you don’t have big bucks to spend on a great phone, the Pixel 6a is where you should put your money.

Read our full Google Pixel 6a review.

pixel 6 pro laying face down on dresser

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The ultimate Android experience

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch OLED (3120 x 1440; 10-120Hz)
Android version: 12
CPU: Tensor
RAM: 12GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP main (ƒ/1.85), 12MP ultrawide (ƒ/2.2), 48MP telephoto (ƒ/3.5) with 4x optical zoom
Front camera: 11.1MP (ƒ/2.2)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 7:49

Reasons to buy

+
Incredible cameras
+
Tensor performs well
+
Beautiful new design
+
More affordable than other flagships

Reasons to avoid

-
Shorter battery life than competitors

If you want the best Android experience possible right now, then look no further than the Pixel 6 Pro. It’s the new big boy from Google with an expansive 6.7-inch QHD+ display with a dynamic 120Hz refresh rate. It also sports the new Tensor system-on-chip, Google’s own homegrown silicon. Built for AI and machine learning, it has some impressive features.

But that’s not all. The Pixel 6 Pro sports the best cameras we’ve ever seen on a Pixel, including a telephoto lens with 4x optical zoom. The big 5,000 mAh battery, while impressive on paper, didn’t come out to truly remarkable battery life results in our testing. However, in our anecdotal usage, the Pixel 6 Pro is more than adequate enough to last a day. And with 30W charging (charging brick sold separately), you can top off quickly.

This is the Android phone for photography enthusiasts, as well as those who want the latest and greatest when it comes to the Android OS itself. Android 12 absolutely shines on this phone. And starting at $899, this is one of the most affordable flagship phones you can find right now.

Read our full Pixel 6 Pro review.

Samsung Galaxy A53 cameras

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Samsung’s best cheap phone

Specifications

Display: 6.5-inch OLED (2400 x 1080)
Android version: 12 with One UI 4.1
CPU: Exynos 1280
RAM: 6GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB / Yes
Rear camera: 64MP main (f/1.8), 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2), 5MP macro (f/2.4), 5MP depth (f/2.4)
Front camera: 32MP (f/2.2)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 9:49 (120Hz), 10:38 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Good display with 120Hz refresh rate
+
Expandable storage up to 1TB
+
Nice design and build quality
+
Excellent software support

Reasons to avoid

-
Mediocre performance

As we wait for Google to reshuffle its Pixel A offerings, the Galaxy A53 is the device to turn to if you want the best Android phone for less than $500. This midrange Samsung handset delivers solid features at a very reasonable $449.

Despite that low price, the Galaxy A53 offers a 120Hz refresh rate for its 6.5-inch display. You’ll also get a capable Exynos 1280 chipset and decent wide and ultrawide cameras. (We could do without the macro and depth sensors cluttering up the back of the phone.)

The Galaxy A53 matches the average smartphone when it comes to battery life, and you can eke out even more battery life by switching to a 60Hz refresh rate if you prefer. But it’s that price tag that may be the A53’s best feature — costing the same as Google’s Pixel 5a, this is another great low-cost Android option.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy A53 review.

Samsung Galaxy S22 Plus best android phones

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best affordable big-screen Samsung flagship

Specifications

Display: 6.6-inch Dynamic AMOLED (2340 x 1080)
Android version: 12, One UI 4.1
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Gen 1
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP wide (f/1.8); 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2); 10MP telephoto (f/2.4) with 3x optical zoom
Front camera: 10MP (f/2.2)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 9:46 (adaptive), 9:57 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful and very bright display
+
Powerful performance
+
Faster 45W charging
+
Strong telephoto camera

Reasons to avoid

-
Battery life barely better than last year

Although we think it’s the epitome of an iterative upgrade, the Galaxy S22 Plus is nonetheless a great Android phone. From the beautiful and bright display to the beefy performance and improved cameras, the middle child of the Galaxy S22 family is a beast.

If you liked the design of the Galaxy S21 last year, then you’ll find a lot to love with the Galaxy S22 Plus. It’s a refinement of Samsung’s new design language. But this phone didn’t wow us with its results in our battery life test. In fact, the Galaxy S22 Plus barely outperforms its predecessor.

For $999, the Galaxy S22 Plus faces stiff competition, but if you want the big screen Galaxy experience and don’t want to spring for the Galaxy S22 Ultra, the Plus is the next best option.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S22 Plus review.

Asus Zenfone 9 display

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best small Android phone

Specifications

Display: 5.9-inch AMOLED (2400 x 1080)
Android version: 12, ZenUI 9
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1
RAM: 8GB, 16GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP (f/1.9) main, 12MP (f/2.2) ultrawide
Front camera: 12MP (f/2.45)
Weight: 6 ounces
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 13:13

Reasons to buy

+
Great battery life
+
Excellent performance
+
Good cameras overall
+
Great value

Reasons to avoid

-
Photos can be a bit warm

Some of us here love small phones, and so does Asus. The Zenfone 9 is the latest handset from the Taiwanese phone maker and boy is it a good one. It packs in a Snapdragon 9 Plus Gen 1, a 4,300 mAh battery, and 8GB or 16GB of RAM into a body with a 5.9-inch display.

With its horsepower, stellar battery life, and good cameras, the Zenfone 9 is the phone to get if you want a smaller device. We love how easy it is to one-hand it, or how little pocket space it takes up. Asus’ ZenUI software is also really nice, offering a stock Android-like experience with some extra features thrown in to enhance things.

Starting at $799, the Zenfone 9 puts other phones like the Galaxy S22 on blast. Samsung still has some advantages, such as with the display, but Asus did a bang up job with the Zenfone 9.

Read our full Asus Zenfone 9 review.

Best Android phones Back view of OnePlus 10T

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
A faster processor in a less expensive Android phone

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch AMOLED (2412 x 1080)
Android version: 12 with OxygenOS 12.1
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1
RAM: 8GB, 16GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP main (f/1.8), 8MP ultrawide (f/2.2), 2MP macro
Front camera: 16MP (f/2.5)
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 10:59 (120Hz), 11:22 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Super-speed charging
+
Strong performance
+
Good battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Weaker cameras than the OnePlus 10 Pro
-
No wireless charging

The OnePlus 10T gives you the chance to enjoy the improved performance of the Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 processor for less, as the latest from OnePlus starts at $649. If you opt for the version packed with 16GB of RAM, you only have to pay $749. That's a pretty low price for a phone that delivers the kind of performance that will satisfy mobile gamers in particular.

There are trade-offs for the OnePlus 10T's lower cost, especially when compared to the OnePlus 10 Pro. The 10T lacks a telephoto lens, and its cameras don't feature the Hasselblad features that have improved the picture-taking capabilities of recent OnePlus models. Still, the battery life on the OnePlus 10T is very strong, and the phone fully charges in 20 minutes. Even if the OnePlus 10 Pro is a better Android phone, there's still a lot to like about the OnePlus 10T.

Read our full OnePlus 10T review.

galaxy z flip 4 in hand

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Making big strides over yesteryear

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch FHD AMOLED (2640 x 1080) inner, 1.9-inch AMOLED (260 x 512) cover
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB / No
Rear cameras: 12MP (f/1.8) main, 12MP (f/2.2) ultrawide
Front camera: 10MP (f/2.4)
Weight: 6.5 ounces
Battery life: 8:33 (Adaptive), 8:57 (60Hz)

Reasons to buy

+
Much better battery life
+
Great performance
+
Same $999 price

Reasons to avoid

-
Minimal camera upgrades
-
Display crease still prominent

We came away from our Galaxy Z Flip 4 review mostly impressed. Not only is the new foldable’s design ever so slightly sleeker, the battery life has vastly improved over the Galaxy Z Flip 3 last year. In our custom battery life test, the Flip 4 went for considerably longer than its predecessor.

The folding 6.7-inch Super AMOLED display is beautiful, even though the display crease remains very noticeable. The Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 1 allows the Galaxy Z Flip 4 to chew through any task, even intensive gaming. And its increased power efficiency is likely helping the handset’s better battery life.

The cameras are a mixed bag. On the one hand, the new night mode is fantastic; but on the other, the daytime photos are less than exciting with Samsung’s characteristic oversaturated look. If the Galaxy Z Flip 4 put out the same photos as the Galaxy S22, we’d be a lot happier. 

Even so, the $999 Galaxy Z Flip 4 is certainly worth your while if you want to jump into the world of foldables. You’ll make some compromises over similarly-priced phones, but the novelty might be worth it to you.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 4 review.

How to choose the best Android phone for you

The first place to start when shopping for the best Android phone for you is your budget. And there are essentially a few tiers. The cheapest Android phones cost under $200 and offer mostly the basics for using apps, taking pictures and staying connected. We chart the best cheap phones under $300, though honestly, you'll make a lot of compromises to get a phone priced that low.

As you move up to under $450, you'll find more compelling handsets, touting better processors, higher-grade materials and more camera lenses. Progress into the $700-and-up range, and the best phones offer flagship-caliber performance along with cutting-edge computational photography and special features.

The most premium Android phones offer foldable designs, though there's talk a new round of devices from Samsung could make foldables more mainstream — that is, make the prices more affordable.

iPhone users looking to switch to Android have lots of choices, as we've outlined above. It's also easier to move platforms, as the Switch to Android app for iOS now supports all Android 12 phones, which covers everything on this list.

How we test the best Android phones

Every smartphone Tom’s Guide evaluates is tested for several days in real-world use cases and benchmarked with a gamut of performance-measuring apps. In terms of performance, we used Geekbench 5 to measure overall speed and 3DMark Wild Life to measure graphics performance.

We also use our own video editing test in the Adobe Premiere Rush app to see how long it takes to transcode a clip, which we run on both Android phones and iPhone to compare performance. (This test is not always available for all phones we test due to app compatibility issues.)

Performance benchmarks
Geekbench 5 (single-core / multicore)3DMark Wild Life Unlimited (FPS)
Galaxy S22 Ultra1240 / 339257
OnePlus 10 Pro995 / 348261
Pixel 61029 / 269634
Pixel 6a1057 / 291842
Pixel 6 Pro1027 / 262040
Galaxy A53745 / 188814
Galaxy S22 Plus1214 / 336160
Zenfone 91190 / 406958
OnePlus 10T1025 / 347666
Galaxy Z Flip 41291 / 401567

To measure the quality of a phone's display, we perform lab tests to determine the brightness of the panel (in nits), as well as how colorful each screen is (DCI-P3 color gamut). In these cases, higher numbers are better. We also measure color accuracy of each panel with a Delta-E rating, where lower numbers are better and score of 0 is perfect.

Display benchmarks
sRGB (%)DCI-P3 (%)Delta-E
Galaxy S22 Ultra138980.25
OnePlus 10 Pro174 (Vivid) / 119 (Natural)123 (Vivid) / 84 (Natural)0.32 (Vivid) / 0.23 (Natural)
Pixel 6101720.28
Pixel 6a131 (Adaptive) / 111 (Natural)93 (Adaptive) / 79 (Natural)0.25 (Adaptive) / 0.2 (Natural)
Pixel 6 Pro104740.3
Galaxy A53204 (Vivid) / 123 (Natural)145 (Vivid) / 87 (Natural)0.32 (Vivid) / 0.31 (Natural)
Galaxy S22 Plus212 (Vivid) / 128 (Natural)150 (Vivid) / 91 (Natural)0.35 (Vivid) / 0.23 (Natural)
Zenfone 9157 (Optimal) / 184 (Natural)111 (Optimal) / 130 (Natural)0.28 (Optimal) / 0.3 (Natural)
OnePlus 10T179.6127.20.31
Galaxy Z Flip 4187 (Vivid) / 110 (Natural)132 (Vivid) / 78 (Natural)0.36 (Vivid) / 0.24 (Natural)

One of the most important tests we run is the Tom's Guide battery test. We run a web surfing test over 5G (or 4G if the phone doesn't have 5G support) at 150 nits of screen brightness until the battery gives out. In general, a phone that lasts 10 hours or more is good, and anything above 11 hours makes our list of the best phone battery life.

Battery life benchmark
Battery life (Hrs:Mins)
Galaxy S22 Ultra9:50 (Adaptive) / 10:15 (60Hz)
OnePlus 10 Pro11:52 (Adaptive) / 12:40 (60Hz)
Pixel 68:13 (Adaptive) / 7:21 (60Hz)
Pixel 6a6:29
Pixel 6 Pro7:43 (Adaptive) / 7:55 (60Hz)
Galaxy A539:49 (120Hz) / 10:38 (60Hz)
Galaxy S22 Plus9:27 (Adaptive) / 10:27 (60Hz)
Zenfone 913:13 (adaptive), 12:52 (120Hz),
OnePlus 10T10:59 (120Hz), 11:22 (60Hz)
Galaxy Z Flip 48:38 (Adaptive), 8:57 (60Hz)

Last but not least, we take the best phones out in the field to take photos outdoors, indoors and at night in low light to see how they perform versus their closest competitors. We take shots of landscapes, food, portraits and more, and also allow you to be the judge with side-by-side comparisons in our reviews. 

For more information, check out our how we test page for Tom's Guide.

Jordan Palmer
Phones Editor

Jordan is the Phones Editor for Tom's Guide, covering all things phone-related. He's written about phones for over five years and plans to continue for a long while to come. He loves nothing more than relaxing in his home with a book, game, or his latest personal writing project. Jordan likes finding new things to dive into, from books and games to new mechanical keyboard switches and fun keycap sets. Outside of work, you can find him poring over open-source software and his studies.

  • Drewtiger13
    admin said:
    Whether it’s a long-lasting battery you need or a headphone jack, there’s bound to be an Android phone that will satisfy your needs. Here are our favorites.

    The 10 Best Android Phones : Read more
    i'll say they should satisfy! has anyone else noticed that most of these phones have significantly more RAM than your average computer !?!?
    Reply
  • rgd1101
    Drewtiger13 said:
    significantly
    not that I see. one at 16, some at 12, 8. well you are looking at the "best" phone, not budget

    unless you getting cheap computer. 8 is min for daily stuff, 16 min for gaming
    Reply
  • Markyballer
    Hi, the Pixel 4a and the Pixel 4a 5G have different chipset . For this reason I would choose the 5g version and put it on 2nd place.
    Reply
  • OleLongKnocker
    Out of curiosity, how is the Fold number 10 on the best Android phone list but number 9 on the general best phone list?
    Reply
  • BBSTL
    admin said:
    Whether it’s a long-lasting battery you need or a headphone jack, there’s bound to be an Android phone that will satisfy your needs. Here are our favorites.

    The 10 Best Android Phones : Read more
    Is usability factoring into any evaluations or is this just a plain technical play review? I find my Samsung Ultra Note 20 to be even less friendly and usable than an iPhone. I sure do miss my Huawei phone. Fast, incredible battery, no bloatware. Too bad the US government targeted them for exclusion, it really was an awesome phone.
    Reply