Skip to main content

Sony, Acer Dumping Green Dam

China's controversial Green Dam Youth Escort software is slowly fading into vaporware, as the latest report indicates that major PC manufacturers have dumped the Web filtering program. Originally, the Chinese government required that all new PCs sold in the country be armed with the program. However, after a huge negative backwash of protests, the government relented and made it "optional" for consumers.

Unfortunately, not everyone was exempt. According to Computerworld, public schools, Internet cafes, and other public areas were forced to install and run the filtering software. Although the software weeded out sensitive political content and pornography, the Chinese government insisted that Green Dam was for the benefit of the children, shielding them from "inappropriate" media.

But recently Green Dam was removed from computers at Beijing Number 50 High School despite the Chinese government's demands, claiming that the software, installed back in June, was causing problems. Now the ripple has moved on to larger corporations including China-based Lenovo, Taiwan-based Acer, and Sony, as all three have now discontinued supporting the Green Dam software.

Computerworld reports that Acer removed Green Dam this month because China no longer required distribution of the software, and Sony stopped shipping the software two months ago. Lenovo no longer pre-installs Green Dam, but will provide a disk version if requested by the consumer.

  • jellico
    The Chinese government didn't roll out tanks to flatten the Beijing Number 50 High School when they removed the government mandated Green Dam malware, hopefully they are finally starting to come around (but I'm probably being foolishly optimistic).
    Reply
  • virtualban
    China rolling out tanks? When? Where?
    (Must change proxy)
    Reply
  • omnimodis78
    The Green Dam is and has always been a minor distraction, since it is quite redundant given that the Central Government filters any sensitive information which they don't want their citizens to know, understand or be educated about. All filtering is done through main servers, not at the end-user level with some silly PC software.
    Reply
  • cybrcatter
    Excellent.
    Reply
  • Major7up
    This was bound to happen, the citizens of China will eventually win out over it's oppressive gov't and it will just become more and more capitalist in nature.
    Reply
  • Pei-chen
    China's controversial Green Dam Youth Escort software is slowly fading into vaporware, as the latest report indicates that major PC manufacturers have dumped the Web filtering program
    Do you know what vaporware means? Green Dam is released so it is not a vaporware.

    I don't know how some of Tom's reporter got their job. Dropped out of acting school and was found by Chris in a cafe?
    Reply
  • maniac5999
    virtualbanChina rolling out tanks? When? Where?(Must change proxy)


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiananmen_Square_protests_of_1989
    Reply
  • maniac5999
    D'oh. there was supposed to be a 'facepalm' in there between the quote and the link. but the forum software seems to have discarded it as junk code.
    Reply
  • eccentric909
    Pei-chenDo you know what vaporware means? Green Dam is released so it is not a vaporware.I don't know how some of Tom's reporter got their job. Dropped out of acting school and was found by Chris in a cafe?
    Vaporware - A term used to describe a piece of software that doesn't exist, is suspected not to exist, or is incapable of performing as promised. It is not uncommon for a software corporation to make fantastic promises as to the functionality of an upcoming software release that ultimately prove to be undeliverable. In the software industry, there is often something of a yin/yang relationship between marketing efforts and technical capabilities. They can't exist without each other, but that doesn't stop them from trying from time to time.

    Doesn't meant it is never released. But, in the story above the usage of the term is a bit questionable.

    They're probably thinking it's evaporating quickly, therefore linking it to the term vaporware... which you're right it wouldn't be classified as such. However, it never did end up serving it's purpose of "protecting the children" either, so it could be used loosely I suppose?
    Reply
  • Pei-chen
    Eccentric909Doesn't meant it is never released. But, in the story above the usage of the term is a bit questionable.

    They're probably thinking it's evaporating quickly, therefore linking it to the term vaporware... which you're right it wouldn't be classified as such. However, it never did end up serving it's purpose of "protecting the children" either, so it could be used loosely I suppose?The software is actually performing as intended from what I gathered. It is the side effects that's crap (slow downs, crashing, etc.) Kinda like a spyware/malware in my opinion.
    Reply