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Dell 2209WA

Roundup: 22-Inch LCD Monitors
By
IPS: the dream technology?

TN screens are often faulted because of a lack of homogeneity and their reduced angle of vision (tending towards black when viewed from above). IPS technology does better, but is not without its faults.

The first concerns energy consumption, almost two times that of a TN screen. The 2209WA consumes at best 59 W, compared to about 30 W for a 22'' TN set to the same brightness.

The second problem is the contrast ratio, not as high as on the other technologies. Our test results for the 2209WA seemed unable to confirm this, however.

The last problem is the temperature generated by these monitors. The 2209WA gets up to 45°C, as much as a 26'' TN panel.

With a rapid response time, a base that allows all possible movements (pivot, swivel and tilt), open angles of vision and even colors, Dell has given us the screen that many have been waiting for.

As with the majority of the manufacturer's monitors, the 2209WA has a sober but elegant design. Dell did not go for integration of a DisplayPort or HDMI on this 22'' screen, leaving just VGA and DVI inputs. However, it does have four built-in USB ports, with two at the front and two more on the side.

Gaming

An averge 2 ms TN is at 0.8 for colored ghosting-this eIPS does better!


Its excellent response time means it can be forgiven for a minimum of ghosting on rapid movement. The 2209WA can handle any game, and it will handle office work with no problem at all. For those who don’t like to play on their own, the 2209WA has an input lag of under 1 image. Multiplayer games will not suffer from any delay between action and reproduction on screen. Only one point is really lacking: 120 Hz--although this is still a luxury for monitors of this size.

Colors

At first the 2209WA doesn’t appear to suffer from any color handling problems. However the sensor highlights a problem surrounding the handling of brightness in grey shades. The deltaE reading suffers as a result and scores only 3.6. This isn’t bad but the best monitors go down below 2, and no improvement is possible via the OSD.


Films

As so often on monitors, the upscaling is very poor. On the 2209WA, the flickering is well contained but the low contrast ratio can pose a problem for blacks and greys.

Because of this problem, the 2009WA will always be your last choice for watching movies, but for everything else, it's a great option. Gamers have every reason to like it, for office work its flexibility is very practical and when on the right settings, this screen is perfect for working on your photos. Lets hope other eIPS screens appear on the market soon!

Dell 2209WA
ProsCons
  • Flexible positioning
  • Good response time
  • Minimal input lag
  • Poor handling of gamma
  • Contrast: lack of depth in blacks

With its eIPS screen, the 2209WA ticks more boxes than the TNs we've seen recently. Overall, it's just as good as the best of them, with the bonus of wide viewing angles.

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  • -9 Hide
    chinesemafia69 , July 27, 2009 6:09 AM
    first:D 
  • 0 Hide
    chinesemafia69 , July 27, 2009 6:10 AM
    wait...wheres the conclusion
  • 0 Hide
    quantumrand , July 27, 2009 8:30 AM
    I am a HUGE fan of LG's flatron monitors. They're generally very competitively priced for the quality you get.

    One word of advice though, Dont buy a monitor online unless it has a zero-dead pixel guaranty as well as free return shipping. With the extremely high pixel counts of today's LCDs, the odds of getting a dead pixel are actually quite high, so the ability to take it back to the store and exchange it without any fees is a real benefit.
  • 0 Hide
    randomizer , July 27, 2009 10:08 AM
    Need to see data, not just "record-breaking response times." A few of the monitors have some numbers but others have nothing more than a description.

    I second the blue dominance on the 2253BW as well. It's a shocker unless you reduce the blue to almost nothing.
  • 0 Hide
    coolkev99 , July 27, 2009 1:20 PM
    I have the Samsung 2253BW. They are right about the color and view angles. Took me a full day tinkering just to get the colors and positioning the way I wanted... big PITA. Once all setup its pretty nice. Best use as a gaming screen, built in hand drip makes moving around easy too.
  • 0 Hide
    randomizer , July 27, 2009 1:47 PM
    I found the 2253BW has bad buttons and bad button positions. My "menu" button doesn't really work and since you can't see any of the buttons it can be hard to find them sometimes.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , July 27, 2009 5:23 PM
    Thanks for the review. It helped me select which LCD Monitor worked best for me.
  • 3 Hide
    andyviant , July 27, 2009 6:36 PM
    Maybe I'm the only Toms reader not up on my display type acronyms, but TN could have been briefly defined prior to using it on every page of this writeup. For those also not in the loop it's Twisted Nematic.
  • 1 Hide
    ravenware , July 27, 2009 7:40 PM
    Aren't Dell LCDs just rebadged?
  • 2 Hide
    IzzyCraft , July 28, 2009 1:41 AM
    I dislike the trend to adding cheap speakers in all monitors above like 22" makes me feel like i'm paying for something i'll never use.
  • 1 Hide
    liemfukliang , July 28, 2009 12:23 PM
    which one the model that has true 24 bits color?
  • 1 Hide
    Anthelvar , July 29, 2009 8:58 PM
    I've got the samsung 2233rz 120hz refresh. GREAT GAMING MONITOR. Plus the 3d with Nvidia is awesome. Some good games are Mass Effect, Fallout 3 and Left 4 Dead. Mass effect is the most visually pleasing of them all, but Left 4 dead is the most fun to use it with.

    Also, it's about time that TOMS finally did a piece that GAMERS might be interested in. By the way, your new GPU charts stink, I don't want subcatagories of high end and low end, just the GPU's for the last 3 years. If you want, color code the charts to price brackets or better yet, Generations of models.

    You guys have lost touch with what gamers want. Plus your website was extremely laggy on the few articles I found interesting in the last month.
  • 0 Hide
    xsamitt , July 30, 2009 1:02 PM
    Hi Toms

    How about a roundup in the 24 inch class.Many of us feel a 24 is the way to go?Please Consider.Thank-You for this articles non the less.

    Xsamitt
  • 0 Hide
    eyemaster , July 30, 2009 7:53 PM
    I'm satisfied with the Samsung T240. I was using a CRT 19 before and this is quite an upgrade. Not the best monitor out there, but I got it for a heck of a deal!
  • 0 Hide
    dcinmich , July 31, 2009 2:08 AM
    When I built my first computer (the one I have now) I went with the LG W2252TQ. My niece has been using an LG monitor for a long time and she highly recommended I try one, so I thought I would take the hint. I picked this monitor up from my local Best Buy where the kind computer tech hooked it up to a PC for me so I could see what Windows looked like on it. I was sold immediately. This has turned out to be the best monitor I have ever owned.
  • 1 Hide
    matobinder , August 7, 2009 3:02 AM
    Very glad to see a LCD review. I'm dreading the day my current tube dies, as most LCDs still can't match them(decent tubes that is). Unless you get in to the 1000 dollar range. Just wish the resolution was better. 1680 x 1050 is losing some space to the traditional 1600x1200. Though 1920 x 1080 is a bit better.

    Hopefully more reviews and more consumer research will prompt companies to start making good quality LCDs and cheaper prices. Dell is kind of annoying, they used to sell some of their dispalys with PVA, and then changed them to TN, without changing the model #/Name. Grr.
  • 1 Hide
    matobinder , August 7, 2009 3:07 AM
    Oops, in regards to my last post. The Dell monitors weren't changed from PVA to TN, they were changed from S-IPS to TN.
  • 1 Hide
    matobinder , August 7, 2009 4:04 PM
    I'm just not on my game anymore. My two previous posts are wrong. Dell didn't switch from S-IPS to TN. They switched from S-IPS to PVA. Not so horrible. I got to work today and sat down at my computer, which is a 4 head box with 4 Dell 2007FP displays. 2 are S-IPS, and 2 are PVA. I can now see a bit of a difference, but its not so bad. S-IPS still looks a little nicer. But I never noticed until I started digging into it and figure out they were different techs.
  • 0 Hide
    ssssss , August 8, 2009 7:16 PM
    Too bad, I've just started using ViewSonic VX2262wm a few days ago...

    As the review said, even for the untrained eyes, the colors are noticeable bad and unable to get it right through OSD, which is disappointing.

    Viewing angle is bad. So bad that if you look at it at the distance closer that 30 cm, you're starting to see dark shadows on the top and the bottom of the screen. You should have keep it at 50 cm distance to see uniform color.

    The responsiveness are OK, but just don't compare it to CRT.

    The internal speakers are jokes. Maximum volume is relatively small compared to standard active speaker. If you turn up a little bit bass, the sound is cracking. At 100% volume setting, you can hear a little annoying static high frequency hiss/noise, even if you don't plug in the audio cable. To set it to almost unnoticeable, I can only set the volume level at around 60%. Included are the EAX virtual sound card that using up computer resources, so that there is silent moment every half a second.

    In short, don't buy it because of the speaker. ViewSonic should have put the money to improve the quality of the monitor instead of installing a pair of cheap speakers.

    To the credit of ViewSonic, the first unit that I ordered contained one dead subpixel. They replaced a new one for me.
  • 0 Hide
    ssssss , August 10, 2009 9:38 AM
    I've managed to improve the above-mentioned monitor's display accuracy by using the webpages...

    http://www.lagom.nl/lcd-test/
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