The best monitors in 2024

The best monitors can help spruce up your desk space and improve every minute you spend with your desktop. Regardless of whether you’re a prosumer video editor who demands outstanding color accuracy or you just need a nice display to complete less demanding tasks on, my panel picks below won’t steer you wrong. 

My current favorite monitor is the brilliant LG UltraGear 45GR75DC. It's one of the best curved monitors you can buy, and much of that owes to its incredible screen that boasts an ultra sharp native 3.5K resolution.

The best monitors you can pick up right now will make completing computing tasks more enjoyable, whether you’re in an office or getting your business done from home. While I have you here, make sure to check out my picks of the best gaming monitors if you’re a fan of the best Steam games

The quick list

Short on time? Here's a brief breakdown of the best monitors on the list below, along with quick links that let you jump directly to the review of whichever monitor you're interested in.

The best monitors you can buy today

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The best overall monitor

LG UltraGear 45GR75DC

(Image credit: Future)
The best monitor for both work and play

Specifications

Size: 45 inches
Resolution: 5120 x 1440
Refresh Rate: 200Hz
Response Time: 1 ms
Ports: HDMI, DisplayPort
Frame Syncing: AMD FreeSync

Reasons to buy

+
A hugely versatile monitor for under $900
+
Fantastic for productivity
+
Impressively fast gaming performance

Reasons to avoid

-
It's not an OLED panel
-
You'll need a big desk to accomodate it

This might seem like a bold choice for best overall monitor considering the LG Ultragear 45GR75DC’s attention-grabbing form factor, but I absolutely stand behind this pick. I now feel we’re at the point where owning an ultrawide curved display no longer needs to be the exclusive purvey of hardcore gamers. This sensational LG screen ticks every box from what you could want from a modern PC monitor; be it for work or play. 

The LG UltraGear 45GR75DC is damn near a perfect monitor that is superbly priced for the features it offers. For $899 (and LG has already started offering this amazing panel for $100 less than that during certain flash sales) you’re getting an unbelievable amount of bang for your buck. 

This 45-inch monster may require a large desk, but its 5,120 x 1,440 32:9 screen makes it a dream display for productivity tasks, even though it's primarily marketed as a gaming monitor. And when it comes to playing the best PC games on this bad boy? Fuhgeddaboudit.  A 200Hz refresh rate. 1ms response times. That utterly immersive 1500R curvature. There’s no other monitor currently out there on the market that offers so much for both professionals working from home and hardcore gamers at such a keenly competitive price point. 

Read our full LG UltraGear 45GR75C review.  

The best budget monitor

Asus TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A

(Image credit: Future)
The best monitor for people on a budget

Specifications

Screen Size: 28 inches
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh Rate: 144 Hz
Inputs: DisplayPort, HDMI, USB-A, USB-B, 3.5 mm audio

Reasons to buy

+
Gorgeous colors
+
Pin-sharp resolution
+
Well suited for PCs and consoles

Reasons to avoid

-
HDR performance isn't the best
-
It lacks USB-C connectivity

Calling the Asus TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A a budget option when it regularly retails for north of $500 may seem a little rich (literally). But c'mon, we're living in a world where people are prepared to sink their life savings into an Apple Vision Pro. Viewed in that context, this excellent 4K monitor looks like a bargain. 

It doesn't skimp on features, either. Future-proofing is ensured thanks to a duo of HDM1 2.1 ports, while the speedy 144Hz refresh rate is fantastic for both gaming and making general desktop browsing feels hugely responsive. The VG28UQL1A's handling of HDR is also terrific, and when you throw in impressive speakers, I fully believe this is one of the best (reasonably affordable) monitors you can buy. 

Read our full Asus TUF Gaming VG28UQL1A review.

The best MacBook monitor

Apple Studio Display with MacBook Pro (2019) connected and playing music via Spotify

(Image credit: Future)
The best monitor for MacBook owners

Specifications

Dimensions: 24.5 x 18.8 x 6.6 inches (with stand, height tops out at 23 inches w/ optional height-adjustable stand)
Screen Size: 27 inches
Resolution: 5,120 x 2,880
Refresh Rate: 60Hz
Ports: 3x USB-C, 1x Thunderbolt 3

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful, bright 5K display
+
Six-speaker array delivers remarkably good sound
+
12MP ultrawide camera captures great images/video
+
Elegant design

Reasons to avoid

-
No height adjustment by default
-
Center Stage not much use on a deskbound monitor

The 27-inch Studio Display ($1,599) is a great 5K monitor, one that delivers a lot of the value of Apple's $5,000 Pro Display XDR in a much more affordable (though hardly cheap) package. 

Like the Pro Display XDR, the Studio Display offers useful features for creative professionals, including a range of reference modes and P3 wide color gamut support. But it also has unique features that any Mac user can enjoy, like a killer (for a monitor) six-speaker sound system and a 12MP ultrawide camera that supports Apple's Center Stage feature, courtesy of an onboard A13 Bionic chip.  

 With its ultrawide camera, fantastic speaker setup and gorgeous 27-inch 5K screen, this is easily one of the best monitors for MacBook Pro owners seeking an external display. 

Read our full Apple Studio Display review.

The best curved monitor

Dell UltraSharp 40 Curved Thunderbolt Hub Monitor

(Image credit: Future)
The best curved monitor is utterly unique

Specifications

Dimensions: 36.5 x 15.4 x 14.3 inches
Screen Size: 40 inches
Resolution: 5120 x 2160
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
Inputs: DisplayPort, HDMI, USB-C

Reasons to buy

+
It's a real one of a kind
+
Port array impresses
+
5K screen is a stunner

Reasons to avoid

-
Glare is a problem in sun-filled rooms
-
Harsh on your wallet

Big is beautiful, right? That's certainly the case with Dell UltraSharp 40 Curved Thunderbolt Hub Monitor, which I really admire for being a total beast when it comes to productivity. Sure, at $2,399 it's not exactly the most affordable model, though thankfully smaller, far cheaper versions are available.

It's so hard not to be floored by the sheer spectacle of the UltraSharp 40 Curved Thunderbolt Hub. Obviously its size is the first thing that catches the eye, but its stunning 5K 120Hz really is a sight to behold, with accurate colour reproduction being a real highlight.

What really separates the UltraSharp from other curved monitors is its pop-out, front-facing USB hub, which is not only great for charging devices, but also when it comes to decluttering your desk by offering a great cable management solution. This is a truly unique display even by curved monitor standards, which is why it gets the nod from me for the best and most interesting curved PC display you can pick up today.

Read our full Dell UltraSharp 40 Curved Thunderbolt Hub Monitor review

The best ultrawide monitor

Alienware 34 AW3423DWF

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best ultrawide monitor

Specifications

Size: 34 inches
Resolution: 3440 x 1440
Refresh Rate: 165Hz (DisplayPort)
Response Time: 0.1ms
Ports: HDMI 2.1, DisplayPort 1.2, USB 3.0
Frame Syncing: AMD FreeSync

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent image quality
+
Fast refresh and latency
+
AMD FreeSync support

Reasons to avoid

-
It's only a minor update over the Alienware 34 AW3423DW

A sensational QD-OLED ultrawide monitor that screams class at every turn. A follow-up to the already brilliant Alienware 34 AW3423DW, this newer model dropped its price tag and added the welcome addition of an HDMI 2.1 port. That means the Alienware AW3423DWF is now far more suited to getting the most out of Xbox Series X and PS5. 

When it comes to gaming performance, this Alienware produces results that are as impressive as the monitor's bold design choices. Using DisplayPort, this monitor can hit a mightily fast 165 Hz refresh rate, which makes it perfect for playing fast-paced shooters, like Doom Eternal. Add in a couple of impressively punchy HDR modes, solid pixel-cleaning settings to help prevent against OLED burn-in and effortlessly inky blacks and you're left with a truly stunning monitor. That 21:9 aspect ratio doesn't just make the best PC games more immersive, the added screen real estate is a dream when navigating multiple browser windows or editing images in Photoshop. 

Read our full Alienware AW3423DWF QD-OLED gaming monitor review.

The best OLED monitor

best monitors: Alienware AW5520QF 55-Inch OLED Gaming Monitor

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best OLED screen

Specifications

Size: 55 inches
Resolution: 3840 x 2160
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
Response Time: 0.5 ms
Ports: HDMI 2.0, DisplayPort, USB 3.0
Frame Syncing: Nvidia G-Sync

Reasons to buy

+
Beautiful, polished design
+
Superb OLED panel
+
DisplayPort and multiple USB 3.0 ports

Reasons to avoid

-
Crazy expensive
-
Complicated to enable features like HDR

The Alienware AW5520QF 55-Inch OLED gaming monitor puts a killer OLED display into a TV-like size that's made for big screen gaming. With a size that toes the line between TV and monitor, the 55-inch display has a highly polished design, a cornucopia of great features and key gaming monitor features such as DisplayPort connectivity and fast 120Hz refresh rates. And while it's technically not a TV, it also comes with a slick remote control to adjust the picture settings and navigate menus from the comfort of your couch.

But it's not just a TV-sized monitor, it's also a superb OLED gaming display. The Alienware boasts a huge color gamut and accuracy that rivals some of the best TVs on the market. The AW5520QF's price will probably scare off folks on a budget, but if you do your PC or console gaming in the living room or want a truly premium monitor, Alienware's behemoth screen is well-suited to the job. And since a computer can stream almost anything, so you'll be able to watch, listen to or play whatever you want.

Read our full Alienware AW5520QF review.

The best low-latency monitor

LG UltraGear 27GR95QE-B

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best low-latency gaming monitor

Specifications

Dimensions: 23.8 x 22.6 x 10.2 inches (w/ stand)
Screen Size: 27 inches
Resolution: 2,560 x 1440
Refresh Rate: 240Hz
Inputs: 2 HDMI 2.1, 1 DisplayPort, 2 USB-A, 1 SPDIF, 1 headphone jack
Response Time: 0.03ms
Aspect Ratio: 16:9
Panel Type: OLED
Weight: 16.2 lbs with stand

Reasons to buy

+
Empty List

Reasons to avoid

-
Empty List

The LG UltraGear 27GR95QE-B ($999) is one of the most gorgeous gaming monitors we’ve seen yet. That’s good news considering we’ve been eager to test this OLED monitor since LG first announced it late in 2022.

But what makes the LG UltraGear 27GR95QE-B so great? It has a fairly subdued design for a gaming monitor. And at 27 inches, it’s not exactly huge. What sets it apart is its jaw-dropping visual fidelity provided by the 2.5K OLED display. Games look phenomenal on this monitor, as does streaming content. The super fast 0.03ms response time and 240Hz refresh rate also deliver an enjoyable gaming experience. The fact it’s less than $1,000 is also a big deal.

The monitor isn't perfect, however. It's considerably dimmer than some of its competitors, and the fact you can't access all menu options without a remote is also troubling. The astonishing picture quality and speedy performance mostly help you overlook these deficiencies, but they're still worth pointing out.

Read our full LG UltraGear 27 review.

Acer Predator X32 FP

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The best mini-LED monitor

The best mini-LED gaming monitor

Specifications

Dimensions: 28.6 x 22.5 x 10.3 inches
Screen Size: 32 inches
Resolution: 4K (3840 x 2160)
Refresh rates: 160Hz
Input: 4x HDMI 2.1, 1x DisplayPort, 1x USB-C, 4x USB-A, 1x USB-B, 1x headphone jack
Response time: 1ms
Aspect ratio: 16:9
Panel type: Mini LED
Weight: 22.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Aggressive design
+
Bold colors
+
Sharp 4K fidelity
+
Fast performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Pricier than the competition

The Acer Predator X32 FP ($1,499) gaming monitor balances stunning visual fidelity and rock-solid performance. This 32-inch behemoth features a gorgeous 4K mini-LED 160Hz display that’s both crisp and colorful. On top of that, the monitor comes with a ton of ports and an aggressive design that demands attention.

This is one of best gaming monitors out there thanks to its blazing-fast performance, smooth refresh rate and vibrant visuals. It takes up a lot of space on one’s desk, but the monitor’s large display helps draw you into the games you’re playing.

While more affordable options exist, the Predator X32 FP is still a great gaming monitor. It just might be a good idea to wait for a price drop before buying this premium device.

Read our full Acer Predator X32 FP gaming monitor review.

The best super ultrawide monitor

Samsung Odyssey G9 OLED sitting on desk

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best 49-inch curved gaming monitor

Specifications

Screen Size: 49 inches
Resolution: 5120 x 1440
Refresh Rate: 240Hz
Response Time: 0.03ms
Ports: 1x HDMI 2.1, DisplayPort, 4x USB-C, headphone
Brightness: 236 nits
sRGB Gamut: 194.5 percent

Reasons to buy

+
Immersive 49-inch viewing experience
+
Super bright and incredibly colorful
+
Tough to top 32:9 gaming at 240Hz

Reasons to avoid

-
Not exactly cheap
-
Too big for your average desk

This is a screen that brings the spectacle. And then some. The Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 instantly grabs your attention thanks to its stupendous size. This was the first-ever 49-inch OLED gaming monitor, and even a year after its initial release it's easily still one of the immersive panels we've ever clapped eyes on. 

Yes, it's pricey. Yet if you can afford it, you're getting a feature-rich monitor with 1,800R curvature to give you wrap-around vision that makes it instantly effortless to lose yourself in the best Steam games. This Samsung's super-speedy 0.03ms response time and 240Hz refresh rate also ensure it's the ideal monitor for fans of first-person shooter games.

There's so much to admire here with the sheer class and craft that Samsung has put into making this incredible OLED super ultrawide. If you have the money (and desk space), you should pick one up immediately.

See our full Samsung Odyssey OLED G9 review.

How to choose the best monitor for you

How to choose the best monitor for you

Finding the best monitor can be a confusing experience when you don't know what to look for. There are a few key details to pay attention to for any monitor, and some specific advice for certain specialized uses.

We evaluate every monitor on the same basic criteria, starting with size and resolution. In general, more is better here: the bigger the display and the higher the resolution, the more you can see. We also measure several aspects of picture quality as part of our review process, looking at how many colors the monitor can produce (reported as color gamut) and how accurately it displays each color (reported as a Delta-E rating). Better scores here make for a better display in every instance. Display brightness is another factor, but higher brightness doesn't always translate into a better display, though it does suggest that a monitor will deliver more vibrant color and may offer HDR (high dynamic range) support.

For some uses, like professional graphics work, you'll need to watch for additional features, and refinements on the basics. If color quality is important in your work, you should look for factory calibrated displays, and pay close attention to the color accuracy and gamut portions of our reviews. You'll also want to spring for matte-finish panels, displays with shade hoods and adjustable monitor stands that let you find the perfect viewing angle.

Things to consider

Size: A larger monitor is generally a better purchase simply because it offers the most visual real estate, which is better for both full-screen media consumption and split-screen multitasking. Higher resolution is also better, since it allows better detail and lets you see more information in the same screen size. The old phrase "bigger is better" applies to both here, and we recommend opting for larger screens and higher resolution whenever possible.

Response time: If you care about playing the latest games under the most optimal conditions, you'll want to look for a monitor with low response time. This measures how long it takes for the display to respond to what you're doing, and it's typically expressed as a measurement (in milliseconds) of how long it takes a pixel on the display to go from one color to another and back again. 

Unless you're planning to play games that demand quick reflexes or pinpoint accuracy, you really don't need to worry about response time. In general, anything under 10ms is good, though for gaming under 5ms is better. Many gaming monitors promise response times as low as 1ms, which is about as good as you can hope for.

Refresh rate: Refresh rate measures how many times per second your monitor is able to to draw a new image. It's measured in Hertz, and again if you're not planning on doing a lot of intense gaming you probably don't need to worry about this very much. Most monitor achieve refresh rates of 60Hz or less, and that's plenty for watching videos or getting work done. However, if you want to play games at higher than 60 frames per second, or you're planning on working with video at framerates higher than 60 fps, you'll want a monitor with higher refresh rates. 120Hz is good, 144Hz is better, and there are even gaming monitors that offer refresh rates of 240Hz or higher.

Finding a good gaming monitor

Gaming also has its own unique concerns. When the difference between victory and defeat can come down to split second timing, you can't afford long lag times. If you want one of the best gaming monitors, we recommend finding a display that offers response times of 15 milliseconds or less.

Smoother gameplay is also part of what you pay for in a gaming monitor, so pay attention to what frame syncing technology a monitor supports. AMD FreeSync and Nvidia G-Sync both allow the monitor and the graphics card to coordinate the refresh rate of the screen with the output of the GPU, but they approach this problem in slightly different ways, and a given monitor will likely provide support for only one or the other format. If your gaming rig uses Nvidia cards, you'll want a G-Sync capable monitor, while AMD-based systems will play nicely with a FreeSync display.

Choosing a secondary monitor

For a secondary monitor to use on the road, you'll want something that's small enough to carry with your laptop, and simple enough to set up and use within moments. For this, we recommend choosing one with a USB-C port for connectivity, as that allows the monitor to use a single cable for both video signal and power. While the basic advice of "bigger is better" does still have some application here, it's also worth considering how well a portable monitor matches the size of your laptop display, since a larger display panel will have different dimensions than your laptop, and may not fit as easily into your backpack or laptop bag.

How we tested these monitors

How we test the best monitors

When seeking out the best monitors, we test every display we review with our Klein K 10-A colorimeter, paired with testing software. We use this high-quality scope to measure the display's brightness levels, color gamut and color accuracy.

Brightness is measured in nits, or candela per square metre (cd/m2). More nits means a higher brightness, which translates into clearer picture, brighter color and usually a more realistic looking image. For basic monitors, we expect a display backlight to produce between 2-300 nits of brightness, though HDR (high dynamic range) displays will often exceed that with a higher maximum brightness. However, brightness alone doesn't make for a great display, since some monitors will wash out colors or offer inconsistent backlight that varies in some portions of the display panel.

HDR also presents its own testing challenges, as new capabilities and standards allow a monitor to offer higher peak luminance than our standard tests will register. When in doubt, read an individual review for a discussion of these issues, and how an individual product will handle each.

Color is the other big concern for displays. Monitors that produce more colors have a larger color gamut, as measured under the sRGB or P3 color standards. This is presented as a percentage, with higher percentages indicating more colors.

Color accuracy is the other aspect of color, which lets us measure how closely a monitor can reproduce a given shade. This is presented as a Delta-E rating, which indicates the level of deviation from perfect. Zero is a perfect score, while higher numbers indicate lower accuracy.

We also test a display's response time, using a Leo Bodnar input lag tester. This device measures how long it takes a signal to travel from a source device to the monitor and show up on the display. Measured in milliseconds, this number is most useful for gamers and anyone that needs immediate onscreen feedback from any input.

Finally, every monitor we test is also used for web browsing, streaming video and gaming, as well as the writing of the review itself. Our anecdotal testing will often allow us to note the quirks of a display that lab testing might miss, whether it's difficulty in scaling content or issues with backlight or color reproduction.

Dave Meikleham
UK Computing Editor

Dave is a computing editor at Tom’s Guide and covers everything from cutting edge laptops to ultrawide monitors. When he’s not worrying about dead pixels, Dave enjoys regularly rebuilding his PC for absolutely no reason at all. In a previous life, he worked as a video game journalist for 15 years, with bylines across GamesRadar+, PC Gamer and TechRadar. Despite owning a graphics card that costs roughly the same as your average used car, he still enjoys gaming on the go and is regularly glued to his Switch. Away from tech, most of Dave’s time is taken up by walking his husky, buying new TVs at an embarrassing rate and obsessing over his beloved Arsenal. 

With contributions from