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What to watch in June: 15 new movies and shows on Netflix, Prime Video, HBO Max and more

Antony Starr as Homelander in The Boys
(Image credit: Prime Video)

Sure, it's summer time — but there are a ton of new shows and movies to watch in June in case your beach day gets rained out. We've found a multitude of options from Netflix, Disney Plus, HBO Max, Hulu and more of the best streaming services. The hardest task is figuring out which one to watch first (not to mention finding the time to stream them all).

The June streaming lineup is packed with big returning shows and some big new stars. So while some will be giddy to hit 'play' on Westworld season 4, The Umbrella Academy season 3, The Boys season 3 or For All Mankind season 3, others are giddy on meeting Ms. Marvel, who seems like a sure-fire Avenger in the making. Meanwhile, Peacock has a new Queer as Folk reboot that looks excellent, and Netflix is bringing Iron Chef back with a new twist.

For those who want their streaming to be feature length (and we're not talking about that upcoming Stranger Things 4 finale), Chris Hemsworth stars in a Netflix movie where he's a scientist conducting weird tests on patients (played by Miles Teller and Jurnee Smollett). 

For all the feels? Andy Garcia and Gloria Estefan look to light up the room in the new Father of the Bride, The Summer I Turned Pretty is a fun-looking YA summer fling adventure and Hulu's got a new modern take on Pride and Prejudice.

Here’s our guide on what to watch in June 2022. For a more immediate binge, check out our picks for new movies and shows to watch this weekend and the 5 best new movies to stream this week to keep you watching.

The Boys season 3 (Prime Video) 

When to stream it: June 3

The Boys, you could say, are back in town. After a shocking and blood-splattered second season 2 finale that begged the question "where do we go from here?" we've found out. Homelander seems to be processing the chaos of the finale with a creepy grin that won't go away. Meanwhile, Billy Butcher has access to Supe powers, Hughie is his new supervisor and both sides will (of course) go to battle, again.

The big story of The Boys season 3 (our pick for the one show to binge-watch right now on Amazon Prime Video) is the newest addition to the cast: Jensen Ackles, star of the long-running Supernatural series. Ackles is playing Soldier Boy, who is The Boys' answer to Captain America. As for what we know about the new season? The movie about The Seven is out, and the comics' super-graphic all-Supes orgy known as Herogasm is set to take place. As if we needed any reminder that this isn't The Avengers. — Henry T. Casey

Stream it on Prime Video (opens in new tab)

Fire Island (Hulu)

When to stream it: June 3

Jane Austen’s novels have been adapted many times, but never in such a wonderfully queer way as Fire Island. This modern take on Pride and Prejudice stars comedians Joel Kim Booster and Bowen Yang as gay best friends who head to the titular beach locale for a week of boozy partying. Yass, rosé all day!

Noah (Booster) is set on finding a hookup for shy pal Howie (Yang). A steamy romance seems to be in the cards when Howie vibes with kind pediatrician Charlie (James Scully). Unfortunately, Charlie’s taciturn friend Will (Conrad Ricamora) is an overprotective buzzkill who dares to insult Noah! What a total Mr. Darcy. Well, you know how this story goes so expect for them to clash, then smash. - Kelly Woo

Stream it on Hulu (opens in new tab)

Physical season 2 (Apple TV Plus)

When to stream it: June 3

It's time to continue to feel the burn, or rather hear all of the burns that Sheila Rubin (Rose Byne) is concocting in her head about how gross and out of shape everyone else is. Yes, Apple's feel-bad drama is back for more, as we watch how Sheila's life has changed now that she's made her first fitness tape. For starters, her rocky relationship with husband Danny (Rory Scovel) seems ever-more tenuous as local real estate titan John Breem (Paul Sparks) is in her sights.

That said, Sheila has a threat to her fitness aspirations as well: the charming Vinnie Green (White Lotus' Murray Bartlett) is a fitness instructor who could steal the show, as he's already working the infomercial scene. — HTC

Stream it on Apple TV Plus (opens in new tab)

Ms. Marvel (Disney Plus)

When to stream it: June 8

The Marvel Cinematic Universe we've been watching has been all heroes and no normies. That changes when we meet one of the Avengers (and Captain Marvel's) biggest fans: Kamala Khan (Iman Vellani) is just your everyday Pakistani-American teen living in New Jersey. And while she's a huge Avengers fan, she doesn't think she'll ever get to soar with her heroes.

Little does she know that her own superhero origin story is about to unfold, which seems to revolve around a family heirloom. Kamala will get powers (but not the ones we've seen in the comics), and maybe that will give her the confidence she needs at school. Nobody tell her that she's co-starring with her hero in The Marvels, though. I don't think she could take that kind of excitement. — HTC

Stream it on Disney Plus (opens in new tab)

Queer as Folk (Peacock)

When to stream it: June 9

When it comes to welcome returns, Peacock's Queer as Folk revival looks like a fun time. A more diverse take than the original, Queer as Folk (2022) takes place in New Orleans' queer community which has to pull itself back up following a tragic event. 

But before that happens, we meet our lead, Brodie (Devin Way of Grey’s Anatomy) who is over the top and not even considering committing himself to a relationship any time soon. Guest stars will include famous faces such as Juliette Lewis (Yellowjackets) as Judy and  Kim Cattrall (Sex and The City) pops up as debutante Brenda. — HTC

Stream it on Peacock (opens in new tab)

For All Mankind season 3 (Apple TV Plus)

When to stream it: June 10

The space drama launched with a slow burn and rocketed to incredible storytelling heights in season 2. The thrilling finale was one of the best episodes of television I’ve seen, full stop. For All Mankind has taken its intriguing “what if” premise — Russians beat the Americans to the moon — and built it into a complex, captivating tapestry. 

Season 3 takes place after another of the show’s signature time jumps: the year 1995, when astronauts first step foot on Mars. But the space race to the Red Planet goes beyond the United States vs. Russia, when a new entrant seeks to shake things up. A charismatic entrepreneur wants to privatize space travel. If that sounds familiar, it’s likely by design. Since the beginning, For All Mankind has delighted in making its timeline oh-so-close to ours. - KW

Stream it on Apple TV Plus (opens in new tab)

Dark Winds (AMC)

When to stream it: June 12

With Better Call Saul season 6 on a brief intermission, AMC is filling the gap with a new psychological thriller that's worth a look. Based on Tony Hillerman's Leaphorn & Chee book series, Dark Wings takes us back to the southwest U.S. in the 1970s as Navajo police officers Joe Leaphorn (Zach McClarnon) and Jim Chee (Kiowa Gordon) who have a very disturbing crime scene on their hands.

Big claw marks on a door, a body in a tub and no answers mean these cops have to scrape all corners of the desert. Oh, and there's also a robbery that may be connected to the murder. A blind elderly woman is one of their best hopes, and Rainn Wilson is playing a character called Devoted Dan, a suspicious missionary who is recruiting followers. — HTC

Stream it on AMC Plus (opens in new tab) and or on AMC with Sling (opens in new tab)

Iron Chef: Quest for an Iron Legend (Netflix)

When to stream it: June 15

Netflix's love of food brought us to the inevitable reboot: Iron Chef is back. And so is returning Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto — one of the OGs of the series. Iron Chef: Quest for an Iron Legend is also bringing back Iron Chef America host Alton Brown as well as Mark Dacascos as The Chairman. 

This time, though, Iron Chef: Quest for an Iron Legend is going for a more "battle royale" type environment, with multiple contestants and Iron Chefs facing off in a season-long challenge. Food TV personality Andrew Zimmerman is one of the permanent judges of the series, and he will be joined by Wolfgang Puck and Nancy Silverton in appearances on select episodes. — HTC

Stream it on Netflix (opens in new tab)

Father of the Bride (HBO Max)

When to stream it: June 16

We're not sure who woke up and said "we need a new Father of the Bride," but we're happy they did. Why? Because the world needs more Andy Garcia, that's why. Billy (Garcia) is the titular dad at the center of a wild and fun wedding where his Cuban-American family hopefully won't clash too much with the Mexican family that his daughter Sofia (Adria Arjona) is marrying into, having just proposed to Adam (Diego Boneta).

But that's not the real problem for Billy. He and wife Ingrid (Gloria Estefan) are not exactly at the peak of their own marriage. Can Billy survive his daughter's nuptials while finding more wedded bliss? We bet, or at least hope so. — HTC

Stream it on HBO Max (opens in new tab)

The Summer I Turned Pretty (Prime Video)

When to stream it: June 17

To all the fans of To All the Boys I've Love Before, you can cancel Netflix all you want, but you better still have Amazon Prime Video. The Summer I Turned Pretty is the latest Jenny Han adaptation, and it looks like a ton of fun. It stars Lola Tung as Belly, who's reuniting with friends on a summer vacation only to find that love complicates all.

Or at least lust and like complicate things when your love triangle is with a pair of brothers. Oh, and if you needed another reason: The Summer I Turned Pretty features one of the first re-recorded Taylor Swift 1989 tracks, “This Love (Taylor’s Version).” — HTC

Stream it on Prime Video (opens in new tab)

Spiderhead (Netflix)

When to stream it: June 17

Chris Hemsworth took a break from his busy schedule of being Thor and being attractive to … be attractive and kinda evil in a new Netflix movie that adapts a New Yorker short story. George Saunders' Escape from Spiderhead told readers about a series of clinical trials where patients' emotions were controlled by drugs. 

Now, Netflix has brought this concept to a high-budget vision, with a secret island with well-designed interiors, Hemsworth as the scientist behind it all, and Miles Teller and Jurnee Smollett as two of his test subjects. Feels a little like Black Mirror The Movie from this angle, but, you know, with higher star power. — HTC

Stream it on Netflix (opens in new tab)

The Umbrella Academy season 3 (Netflix) 

When to stream it: June 22

A much-loved and highly acclaimed dark fantasy/sci-fi about a bunch of kids trying to save the world and getting into all kinds of trouble… No, not Stranger Things season 4 — we’re talking about Umbrella Academy season 3. It’s almost as eagerly anticipated, though, and with good reason. 

Season 2 was a mind-bending trip of a series, taking us back to an alternate 1960s Dallas and mixing in storylines about the civil rights movement, the JFK assassination, sexuality and domestic violence. It ended on the mother of all cliffhangers, with the UA managing to stop a nuclear apocalypse and return to the present day. Only when they got there, it wasn’t our present day, and they’d been replaced by another group of gifted kids called The Sparrows.  Life’s never simple in the Umbrella Academy. Cue season 3. — Marc McLaren 

Stream it on Netflix (opens in new tab)

Money Heist: Korea – Joint Economic Area (Netflix)

When to stream it: June 24

The original Money Heist is over, but a new one has just begun. Yes, that familiar set of red jumpsuits and masks are back, this time taking on a mint in a fictionalized version of Korea where North and South Korea have united. It's all spawned by the fact that despite the promises that life would get better in this new Korea, only the rich actually are doing better.

This new Money Heist has its own strategic "Professor" who's pulling off the plan, and he's pulled in a series of experts to help him. Each is known by a different city or country as their code name, including Tokyo, Berlin, Denver, Nairobi and Helsinki. And they're all out for what they believe they're owed. A hostage situation ensues as well, and as the trailer puts it, "Welcome to capitalism." — HTC

Stream it on Netflix (opens in new tab)

Westworld season 4 (HBO)

When to stream it: June 26

The biggest event of HBO Max's June 2022 is the return of the violent delights and violent ends of Westworld. Just over 2 years since season 3 ended, Evan Rachel Wood, Thandiwe Newton, Ed Harris, Jeffrey Wright, Tessa Thompson and Aaron Paul are back in the ever-complex series whose hints HBO doles out more sparingly than a Mad Men teaser.

While season 3 was in neo-Los Angeles, it looks like Westworld's gone east to a New York-esque cityscape. Who knows what Delos park we'll see this time, as the WWII-era version of Italy set quite a bar for on-the-nose references. Oh, and there is an unsettling amount of flies. — HTC

Stream it on HBO Max (opens in new tab)

Only Murders in the Building season 2 (Hulu)

When to stream it: June 28

One of Hulu's biggest recent hits is back for a second round of fictional-true crime podcast fun. And this time, the series is going for a slightly different twist: Selena Gomez told Deadline that we should expect a 1970's feel to it all and a "serial killer attitude." She also says "this is a million times better than Season 1."

The new season brings a new podcast-within-a-show with it, as the Arconia's wannabe detectives now have a lot more attention. The only problem? Well, building board president Bunny (Jayne Houdyshell) has been found dead and our heroes are the biggest suspects. — HTC

Stream it on Hulu (opens in new tab)

Henry T. Casey
Senior Editor

Henry is a senior editor at Tom’s Guide covering streaming media, laptops and all things Apple, reviewing devices and services for the past seven years. Prior to joining Tom's Guide, he reviewed software and hardware for TechRadar Pro, and interviewed artists for Patek Philippe International Magazine. He's also covered the wild world of professional wrestling for Cageside Seats, interviewing athletes and other industry veterans.

With contributions from