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The best wireless gaming mouse in 2022

Best wireless gaming mouse
(Image credit: Razer)

Just a decade ago, calling something the “best wireless gaming mouse” would have been a dubious honor, at best. Fortunately, wireless gaming mice have come a long way since then, often delivering performance that’s on a par with the best mice overall. Lag, imprecision and dropped signals are a thing of the past — provided that you buy a high-quality mouse from a reputable manufacturer, that is.

As is the case with other PC gaming peripherals, not every wireless gaming mouse is created equal. The Tom’s Guide staff has reviewed dozens of wireless gaming mice over the years, from trusted brands such as Corsair, Logitech, Razer and SteelSeries. 

Here, we’ve rounded up the best wireless gaming mice that you can buy, from inexpensive laptop accessories to top-of-the-line desktop peripherals. Read on to learn about the best wireless gaming mouse for your setup.

What is the best wireless gaming mouse?

While there is no definitive best wireless gaming mouse for every circumstance, there is probably a device that’s ideal for your setup. My easiest recommendation is the Logitech G502 Lightspeed: a $150 all-purpose gaming mouse with tunable weights. Its wired counterpart is our recommendation for the best gaming mouse overall, and the Lightspeed variant is just as comfortable and effective.

If you’re resistant to spending a lot of money, then the Corsair Harpoon RGB Wireless is the way to go. At only $50, this is one of the cheapest wireless mice you can get from a major manufacturer. It’s pretty small, and goes well with most laptops, especially if you travel frequently.

Console players may want to look into the Razer Turret, which is one of the few wireless mice that’s designed specifically with an Xbox in mind. While the Turret works fine on most PCs, the real draw is that you can use it to navigate an Xbox console, and play a variety of different games. While most wired gaming mice work with the Xbox Series X, wireless models can be a little hit or miss.

Also consider pairing these mice with the best gaming keyboards, the best gaming headsets, the best gaming chairs, the best gaming laptops, the best gaming PCs and the best PC games.

The best wireless gaming mouse you can buy today

Best wireless gaming mouse: Logitech G502

(Image credit: Logitech)
Best wireless gaming mouse overall

Specifications

Max DPI: 25,600
Buttons: 11
Size: 5.2 x 3.0 x 1.6 inches
Weight: 4.0 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent design
+
Flawless wireless
+
Great performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Much more expensive than wired variant
-
Imperfect tunable weights

The Logitech G502 is the best wired gaming mouse you can buy, so it should come as no surprise that the Logitech G502 Lightspeed is arguably the best wireless gaming mouse on the market. Like the standard G502, the G502 Lightspeed features an incredibly comfortable design, complete with plenty of programmable buttons and well-placed textured grips. You can use the Logitech G Hub software to customize its RGB lighting, and the mouse is compatible with the Logitech PowerPlay charging mouse pad.

The only real reason to avoid the G502 Lightspeed is its high price. The device costs about twice as much as the wired version, for essentially the same functionality. However, having wireless connectivity may be worth the price hike, and with 50 to 60 hours of battery life, you won’t have to use a cord too often.

Read our full Logitech G502 Lightspeed review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Corsair Harpoon RGB Wireless

(Image credit: Corsair)
Best budget wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 10,000
Buttons: 5
Size: 4.6 x .7 x 1.6 inches
Weight: 3.5 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable grip
+
Excellent performance
+
Reasonable price

Reasons to avoid

-
Unnecessary lighting
-
Too small for large hands

The Corsair Harpoon RGB Wireless has been on the market for a long time, primarily because there’s nothing about it that needs changing. This small, straightforward mouse costs less than $50, but delivers a comfortable grip, a few extra buttons and full-featured performance. You can program buttons with the iCUE software; you can switch between USB and Bluetooth connectivity; you can even get up to 60 hours of battery life. If the Harpoon RGB Wireless makes any missteps, it’s hard to categorize them.

Granted, the mouse may be a little too small for gamers with large hands. The RGB lighting is also superfluous, at best, since you’ll cover the only illuminated area with your palm. Otherwise, the Harpoon RGB Wireless is one of the best deals in the gaming mouse space, particularly for a wireless model.

Read our full Corsair Harpoon RGB Wireless review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro

(Image credit: Razer)

3. Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro

Best all-purpose wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 20,000
Buttons: 8
Size: 5.0 x 2.4 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 3.1 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable design
+
Excellent performance
+
USB and Bluetooth connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Almost three times as expensive as wired version
-
Inconsistent Synapse software

The Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro comes from a proud tradition of Razer DeathAdder mice. With its comfortable design and robust functionality, it’s no surprise that the DeathAdder has been on the market for 15 years, or that it’s sold more than 10 million units in that time. 

If you’ve never used a DeathAdder, it’s sort of the template for a modern gaming mouse, with an ergonomic shape, a handful of programmable buttons and a robust software suite in Razer Synapse.

The DeathAdder V2 Pro is simply a wireless variant of the wired DeathAdder V2, which also features a textured scroll wheel, coarse grips and a little tasteful RGB lighting. While the DeathAdder V2 Pro isn’t the fanciest wireless gaming mouse on the market, it’s incredibly intuitive, and not too expensive. It ain’t broke, and Razer hasn’t fixed it.

Read our full Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: SteelSeries Rival 300 Wireless

(Image credit: SteelSeries)
An excellent budget wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 18,000
Buttons: 6
Size: 4.7 x 2.3 x 1.5 inches
Weight: 3.7 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
One of the cheapest options from a major manufacturer
+
Easy to set up
+
Straightforward software

Reasons to avoid

-
One tiny RGB zone
-
Technical difficulties

For small and simple gaming mice, the SteelSeries Rival 3 Wireless is hard to beat. This mouse is about as no-frills as you can get, assuming you still want a high-quality peripheral from a major manufacturer. It costs less than $50, making it an incredibly good deal among wireless gaming mice. Even apart from the price, though, the Rival 3 Wireless boasts good performance, intuitive software and an ergonomic design. There are no grips, and only one tiny RGB lighting zone, though, so know what you’re getting into.

On the bright side, the mouse can switch effortlessly between USB and Bluetooth wireless, and SteelSeries claims that the mouse can last for up to 400 hours on two AA batteries. Granted, this means that you’ll have to replace batteries periodically rather than simply recharging them, which can be a pain.

Read our full SteelSeries Rival 3 Wireless review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Logitech G Pro X Superlight

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best lightweight wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 25,600
Buttons: 5
Size: 4.9 x 2.5 x 1.6 inches
Weight: 2.2 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Incredibly light
+
Smooth, sleek design
+
No extraneous features

Reasons to avoid

-
Too expensive for limited feature set
-
Not that different from G Pro Wireless

The Logitech G Pro X Superlight demonstrates that you can have an unbelievably lightweight mouse without opting for a distracting honeycomb aesthetic. While the G Pro X weighs just 2.2 ounces, it packs a ton of performance, with an accurate sensor, an ergonomic design and two well-placed thumb buttons.

The interesting thing about the G Pro X Superlight is just how unadorned it is. There's no RGB lighting; there are no textured grips; there's no customization potential. What you get in return, though, is one of the absolute lightest gaming mice on the market, with a rechargeable 70-hour battery and easy-to-use Logitech G Hub software. While the G Pro X Superlight is pretty expensive, it's also worth the price for esports aficionados. You can also pair it with the Logitech PowerPlay mousepad for constant charging.

Read our full Logitech G Pro X Superlight review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Razer Orochi V2

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best wireless gaming mouse for laptops

Specifications

Max DPI: 18,000
Buttons: 6
Size: 4.2 x 2.3 x 1.5 inches
Weight: 2.1 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Portable and lightweight design
+
Superb battery life
+
Ultra-low latency

Reasons to avoid

-
No Chroma RGB lighting
-
Requires batteries

Most wireless gaming mice are large beasts, designed for large batteries and even larger hands. That's not the case with the Razer Orochi V2, a tiny peripheral that goes well with gaming laptops. 

The Orochi V2 measures only 4.2 x 2.3 x 1.5 inches, which means it will fit comfortably in backpacks, laptop bags and small hands. It also supports claw, palm and fingertip grips, which isn't the case with every gaming mouse.

While the Orochi V2 doesn't have a rechargeable battery, a single AA will net you up to 40 days of battery life, provided you work in Bluetooth mode. (USB wireless isn't quite as efficient.) The mouse also doesn't come with RGB lighting, but that's not a huge drawback if performance is your top concern.

Read our full Razer Orochi V2 review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro SE

(Image credit: Corsair)
The best Qi charging wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 18,000
Buttons: 8
Size: 5.0 x 3.5 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 5.0 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Comfortable design
+
Great wireless connectivity
+
Handy Qi charging

Reasons to avoid

-
Imprecise battery indicator
-
Stiff scroll wheel

If you want your desktop to be as wireless as possible, you should turn to devices that also charge wirelessly. The Corsair Dark Core RGB Pro SE is one of the few gaming mice that offers wireless Qi charging, and the feature works pretty well. The battery lasts up to 50 hours, and you can use the mouse in either USB or Bluetooth wireless modes. That's more than a week of average use, or just under a week of heavy use.

The Dark Core RGB Pro SE has great in-game performance, colorful RGB lighting and even a swappable side panel, depending on whether you want an extra grip for your outermost fingers. At less than $100, the mouse isn't even that expensive, making it one of the better deals on this page.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Razer Naga Pro

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best MMO wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 20,000
Buttons: 17 (adjustable)
Size: 4.7 x 2.9 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 4.1 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Extremely versatile
+
Comfortable design
+
Two kinds of wireless connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Imperfect USB wireless
-
Disappointing six-button thumbpad

The Razer Naga Pro is possibly the best massively multiplayer online (MMO) gaming mouse on the market, but it has the potential to be a whole lot more than that, too. Like most MMO mice, the Naga Pro has a large side panel with a dozen extra buttons. Unlike most MMO mice, however, the Naga Pro also has two other swappable side panels, which you can use if you prefer a six- or two-button setup instead. As such, the Naga Pro is a surprisingly versatile tool.

Granted, you'll pay a lot of money for that kind of flexibility, and some of the side panels work better than others. It's also disappointing that the Naga Pro doesn't offer a "hex" panel design, as the wired Razer Naga Trinity did. But you do get excellent performance and long battery life.

Read our full Razer Naga Pro review.

Best wireless gaming mouse: SteelSeries Aerox 5 Wireless

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

9. SteelSeries Aerox 5 Wireless

The best honeycomb wireless gaming mouse

Specifications

Max DPI: 18,000
Buttons: 9
Size: 5.1 x 2.5 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 2.6 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight design
+
Great battery life
+
USB and Bluetooth connectivity

Reasons to avoid

-
Odd button layout
-
Divisive appearance

While the "honeycomb" design in ultra-lightweight gaming mice is polarizing, some players really do prefer the unusual aesthetic and improved airflow. As such, if you're going to get a wireless honeycomb mouse, the SteelSeries Aerox 5 Wireless is the way to go. This full-size mouse weighs only 2.6 ounces, making it one of the lighter options on the market. It also has good in-game performance and sensible SteelSeries Engine software.

It's worth noting that the "paddle" button right above the thumb buttons doesn't work as well as it could, and that the thumb buttons themselves are tiny. But the Aerox 5 Wireless is comfortable to hold, and plays especially well with esports genres. That makes it worth considering for competitive players.

Best wireless gaming mouse: Razer Turret for Xbox One

(Image credit: Razer)
The best wireless gaming mouse for Xbox

Specifications

Max DPI: 1,000
Buttons: 7
Size: 5.0 x 2.8 x 1.7 inches
Weight: 3.7 ounces

Reasons to buy

+
Elegant design
+
Excellent in-game performance
+
Compatible with both Xbox One and PC
+
Long battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
Extremely expensive
-
Lacks bells and whistles from other Razer gear

Truthfully, the Razer Turret is more of a gaming keyboard than a gaming mouse. But if you want to navigate your Xbox One or Xbox Series X as you would a PC, it's still worth considering. 

The Turret is a wireless mouse-and-keyboard combo, specifically designed for living room console play. You place the keyboard component in your lap, slide out a mouse pad, and move the mouse around just as you would on a desk.

The Turret is a bit of a niche product. It's expensive, it doesn't work with PlayStation consoles and not many Xbox games let you use a mouse and keyboard seamlessly. However, it could conceivably give you an edge in some high-profile titles, including Halo Infinite and Sea of Thieves. Whatever else you can say about the Turret, there's nothing quite like it.

Read our full Razer Turret for Xbox One review.

How to choose the best wireless gaming mouse for you

Choosing the best wireless gaming mouse for your setup comes down to three main factors: Size, connectivity and price.

Size is the easiest choice to make, as you probably already know whether you prefer large or small mice. If you have large hands or prefer holding mice in a claw grip, you might want a larger mouse. If you have small hands or intend to use your mouse primarily as a laptop accessory, you might want a smaller mouse.

Best wireless gaming mouse

(Image credit: Corsair)

Connectivity is also relatively easy to gauge. Some gaming mice offer wireless connectivity over USB and Bluetooth; others just offer USB. If you intend to use your mouse with a desktop, all you need is USB. If you want to use your mouse with mobile devices or a laptop with few USB ports, Bluetooth can be useful.

Finally, there's price. Wireless gaming mice generally range from $50 up to $150, with expensive models offering more features. Bear in mind that cheaper models tend to be smaller, too.

How we test wireless gaming mice

Tom's Guide tests wireless gaming mice the same way it tests any other gaming peripheral. We use the device as our primary mouse for a few days, evaluating the overall shape, weight and comfort level. Then, we'll dive into at least four different games across four different genres, testing whether the mouse has any particular strengths or weaknesses in-game.

Whenever possible, we'll also spend time manipulating a gaming mouse's software suite, seeing how easy it is to reprogram buttons, adjust RGB lighting and create profiles for individual games.

For wireless mice in particular, battery life is a big concern. As such, we'll monitor how quickly the battery runs down, how long the mouse takes to recharge and how much of a difference options such as lighting and connectivity type make. While we can't always measure a mouse's full battery life from start to finish, we can usually extrapolate after a few days.

Marshall Honorof is a senior editor for Tom's Guide, overseeing the site's coverage of gaming hardware and software. He comes from a science writing background, having studied paleomammalogy, biological anthropology, and the history of science and technology. After hours, you can find him practicing taekwondo or doing deep dives on classic sci-fi.