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The best ad blockers in 2020

best ad blockers
(Image credit: Sharaf Maksumov/Shutterstock)

The need to install one of the best ad blockers and privacy extensions becomes more apparent the longer you spend on the web. While most of the websites we enjoy are free, there's still a price and it comes in the form of ads. As unobtrusive as many online ads are, pop-ups that overtake your browsing are almost too much to bare. And then there's the security aspect of bad ads — cookies and other ad trackers can compromise your online privacy.

Ad blockers can preserve your privacy and restore some sanity back to browsing. The best ad blockers and anti-tracking apps let you block irritating ads, save precious bandwidth and opt out of intrusive marketing schemes. They can even block malicious ads that seek to infect your devices.

The downside to ad blockers is they take revenue away publications like the one you're reading and risk the ability of media to provide otherwise free content. But if you're willing to accept the trade-offs, you'll find plenty of the best ad blockers — both extensions and apps — that let you take control of your browsing experience on your computer as well as your mobile device.

What are the best ad blockers?

Finding the best ad blocker depends on which device you're using to browse the internet, with ad blocking tools available for both PCs and mobile phones and tablets. The very best ad blockers work with multiple devices, giving you a seamless experience no matter where you're surfing. And to make our top picks easier to peruse, we've divided these ad blockers by category.

AdBlock Plus is available across multiple platforms — desktop browsers as well as Android and iOS — so it's likely going to be the first stop for lots of people. For blocking ads on a desktop browser, try either AdBlock, AdBlocker Ultimate or Ghostery, which work with a wide variety of browsers. Chrome supports a number of different ad blockers — we suggest trying either Popper.

While many ad blockers are available as extensions, some come in the form of standalone products. AdGuard and AdLock are your best options here. Mobile users will want to turn to either AdAway for Android or 1Blocker X for iOS. Firefox Focus — an off-shoot of the standard Firefox browser that places a greater emphasis on privacy — works on both mobile platforms.

Our list of the best ad blockers also include other privacy-focused extensions and apps. These include the Opera web browser, available on both desktops and mobile devices and Privacy Badger from the Electronic Freedom Foundation.

The best ad blockers you can get today

1. AdBlock Plus (Chrome, Edge, Firefox, Opera, Safari, Android, iOS)

best ad blockers: adblock plus

(Image credit: Eyeo)

AdBlock Plus (ABP) is among the most popular ad blockers, with extensions available for Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Edge and Opera. ABP features a quick setup, loading preset filter lists that allow users to quickly block most ads, as well as the option to filter malware and social media buttons. 

Savvy users can chose additional block lists as well as set custom filters or whitelist their favorite sites to keep their ad revenue in the black. AdBlock Plus allows what it calls "non-intrusive advertising" through filters; that may irk some users, though this feature can be disabled in settings. 

On Android, the AdBlock Browser provides a Firefox-based browser that blocks incoming advertising, while on iOS, the AdBlock Plus app integrates with the content blocker system to seamlessly block advertising on Safari with minimal setup.

Download AdBlock Plus: Firefox, Chrome, Safari, Opera, Edge

2. AdBlock (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge)

best ad blockers: AdBlock

(Image credit: GetAdBlock.com)

AdBlock (no relation to AdBlock Plus) is the other best ad-blocking browser extension of note, available for users of Chrome, Firefox, Edge and Safari. AdBlock uses a series of filter lists to automatically block ad content coming from known ad servers and providers. Users can stick with the default block lists, subscribe to additional ones, or even create their own, as well as whitelist their favorite websites. 

As one of the most downloaded Chrome and Safari extensions, AdBlock has the trust of many users worldwide.

Download AdBlock: Chrome, Firefox, Safari, Edge

3. Poper Blocker (Chrome)

best ad blockers: Poper Blocker

(Image credit: Poper Blocker)

Rather than be an all-in one blocking solution, Poper Blocker (aka Pop Up Blocker For Chrome), is designed to complement other adblockers. 

In this case, Poper Blocker focuses on blocking pop-ups, pop-unders, overlays, timed and scroll pop-ups, and other varieties that might slip past other ad-blocking extensions. Small notifications tell you when pop-ups are blocked. You also can view your blocking stats, but otherwise, you can generally just keep Poper Blocker running in the background with minimal impact alongside other adblocker extensions.

Download Poper Blocker: Chrome

4. AdBlocker Ultimate (Chrome, Firefox, Opera)

best ad blockers: AdBlocker Ultimate

(Image credit: AdAvoid)

AdBlocker Ultimate is a free browser-based ad blocker that makes a big deal about being beholden to no advertising companies, strictly letting no ads through. It also doesn't have any corporate sponsorships that let through whitelisted website ads. 

In addition, AdBlocker Ultimate blocks known malware, adware, and tracking domains. The add-on is available for popular browsers like Chrome, Firefox and Opera.

Download AdBlocker Ultimate: Chrome, Firefox, Opera

5. uBlock Origin (Chrome, Firefox)

best ad blockers: Ublock Origin

(Image credit: Ublock Origin)

Ublock Origin is a browser-based ad blocker that focuses on simple, efficient blocking with a low resource overhead. The extension comes loaded with a number of filter lists for known advertising and malware sources, with extra filter lists available and the option to read and create your own custom filters from hosts files.

Download Ublock Origin: Chrome, Firefox

6. Ghostery (Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Edge)

best ad blockers: ghostery

(Image credit: Ghostery)

Like the other extensions on our list of the best ad blockers, Ghostery can remove ads from webpages, so you can focus on content and browse more efficiently. But the real value in Ghostery lies in its privacy protection features. You can use Ghostery to view trackers, which lets you see who's trying to collect data on you. With Ghostery, you can also stop that tracking from taking place. If you really want to safeguard your privacy, you can turn to Ghostery's Enhanced Anti Tracking to anonymize your data.

Ghostery's a free download that offers basic web protection. More advanced protection starts at $4.99 a month and the $11.99 monthly tier comes with a built-in VPN. There are also versions of Ghostery that work with Android and iOS devices.

Download Ghostery: Chrome, Firefox, Opera, Edge

The best ad-blocking stand-alone applications

1. AdGuard (Windows, Mac, Android, iOS)

best ad blockers: adguard ad blocker

(Image credit: AdGuard)

Uses looking for a more robust experience can try out the subscription-based AdGuard, which provides desktop and mobile options to reduce the ads you see when surfing online. 

AdGuard on Windows and Mac covers popular browsers, with highly configurable options for ads, content, and tracker blocking, as well as a parental controls module for restricting adult content. AdGuard for Android is a no-root ad-blocker that blocks advertising on apps and games, though you’ll have to install it from AdGuard’s site instead of through Google Play. AdGuard for iOS works with Safari to effectively filter ads on the default browser.

Download AdGuard: Windows, Mac, Android, iOS

2. AdLock (Windows, $22 per year; Android, $11 per year)

best ad blockers: adlock

(Image credit: AdLock)

AdLock avoids the browser-based route, instead opting to run as a separate program to be able to block not only browser-based ads, but also advertising in other programs like Skype or games. 

The app runs in the background, using filters to block ads, popups, and autoplaying videos, speeding up loading times and applying Safe Browsing features to automatically block sites that are known to be unsafe. 

For obvious reasons, the mobile version is unavailable on the Google Play Store, so you'll need to sideload the app if you want to get AdLock into your Android device.

Download AdLock: Windows, ChromeAndroid

3. Wipr (macOS, iOS; $1.99)

best ad blockers: Wipr

(Image credit: Giorgio Calderolla)

If you’re a Safari fan, Wipr may be the best ad blocker for both your Mac and iPhone. The app is available for both iOS and macOS — costing $1.99 from either Apple App Store — and it promises to work with Safari as well as apps that use Safari for displaying web pages.

You’ll find a full array of features with Wipr, which not only blocks apps and trackers, but cryptocurrency miners, EU cookie and GDPR notices and anything else that gets in your way of surfing the web. Its blocklist gets updated twice a week, and there’s little configuration; the idea is that you load Wipr and forget that it’s there while it does its job in the background.

With Wipr, pages should load faster in Safari, which will be particularly welcome if you’re surfing from an iPhone, where ads and trackers can bog down your browser’s speed.

Download Wipr: macOS, iOS

Ad-blocking mobile apps

1. AdAway (Android)

best ad blockers: AdAway

(Image credit: AdAway)

Android users with a rooted device can check out AdAway, a free and open source ad-blocker that works on the host's file level. That way, when an app or webpage makes a request to a particular ad provider, it instead goes to a blank IP address (127.0.0.1), saving your bandwidth and keeping you from being spammed by advertising. 

AdAway lets you use hosts files from a variety of sources, or one of your making, with options to blacklist or whitelist particular addresses and add your own redirects.

You will need to allow installing third party apps (or download AdAway through the F-Droid app), as AdAway isn't available in the Google Play store.

Download AdAway: Android

2. 1Blocker X (iOS)

best ad blockers: 1Blocker X ad blockers

(Image credit: Salavat Khanov)

1Blocker was one of the first really good ad blockers on iOS when Apple opened up that functionality on iPhones and iPads, and 1Blocker X is an overhaul optimized for Safari. 

The app is designed to make browsing faster and more secure by blocking ads, popups, trackers and other online cruft. Rather than blocking content of a downloaded page, 1Blocker works with Safari's content blocker API to tell the browser what to block in advance, saving time and resources. 

1Blocker X features more than 115,000 blocker rules, custom regional adblocking settings, and easy-to-use custom rules settings. The app is a free download, with premium features available as in-app purchases.

Download 1Blocker X: iOS

3. Firefox Focus (Android, iOS)

best ad blockers: firefox focus

(Image credit: Firefox)

Firefox Focus is another addition to Mozilla's family of browsers. This one's a privacy-oriented version of Firefox that bakes in ad-blocking and anti-tracking into a light and functional package. Firefox Focus blocks ads and speeds up browsing, while also working in privacy-friendly features like automatic history and cookie clearing. 

Users can selectively block ads, analytics, content and social trackers with easy toggles, turn on a "stealth" mode, and set a default search engine.

Our look at the best Android browsers has more on the various flavors of Firefox.

Download Firefox Focus: Android, iOS

Other privacy-focused extensions and apps

1. Opera (Desktop, Android, iOS)

best ad blockers: opera best ad blocker

(Image credit: Opera)

The Opera browser bakes in ad-blocking features into the browser without the need for an extra add-on, while also offering privacy-friendly tools such as an unlimited, built-in VPN service, incognito mode, fraud and malware warnings for suspicious links and pages, and more. In addition, you can further customize Opera's capabilities with a wide array of extensions. 

Mobile users need not fret, as the Android version comes with just about everything the desktop version has but built for touch-screen interfaces. On iOS, the mobile version of Opera is listed in Apple's App Store as Opera Touch.

Download Opera: Mac or Windows, Android, iOS

2. Privacy Badger (Chrome, Firefox, Opera)

best ad blockers: privacy badger ad blocker

(Image credit: EFF.org)

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's Privacy Badger browser extension was born from the EFF's concerns about the business models of some privacy tools and ad blockers. 

Privacy Badger functions similarly to extensions like AdBlock Plus (on which it was based), observing the various tracking tools that advertisers and other third parties might use to track your online activities and selectively blocking them from executing. Built-in learning algorithms adapt to the sites you visit and take any new tracking tools discovered into account. 

While not explicitly an ad blocker, Privacy Badger does also block some advertising, depending on how aggressively the ads track you across websites.

Download Privacy Badger: Chrome, Firefox, Opera

3. Tor Browser (Desktop, Android)

best ad blockers: tor project browser

(Image credit: Tor Project)

The Tor network helps anonymize your internet activity by bouncing the data you send and receive through a distributed anonymous network of routers to foil a common online surveillance technique called traffic analysis, which can reveal the sites you visit or who you're communicating with. 

The Tor Browser is an all-in-one package that includes everything you need to surf the net through the Tor network in an easy-to-install portable package. The package includes a modified version of Firefox with privacy aids such as NoScript baked in, and an automatic setup aid that makes it easy to connect to and create new Tor circuits. 

On the desktop, you can grab a version of Tor Browser for Windows, macOS or Linux. There's also a version of Tor Browser for Android, which replaces the previous OrBot + OrFox combination recommended for browsing Tor on Android.

Download Tor Browser: Desktop, Android

4. Onion Browser (iOS)

best ad blockers: onion browser ad blocker

(Image credit: Onion Browser)

iOS users aren’t left out when it comes to browsing the Tor anonymizer network, with the Onion Browser among the more popular options on Apple’s mobile OS. 

Previously a premium app, Onion Browser has since moved to a donation model, opening up access to everyone who wants to download the app, without compromising security or features. The usual caveats apply: Browsing through Tor will slow down the web experience, and some features, like video streams and video files won’t work in order to preserve anonymity.

Download Onion Browser: iOS

How to choose the best ad blocker for you

Many ad blockers are available for free, either as extensions or as standalone apps, though a few, like AdLock, charge a fee. Determine if the free services provide enough ad-blocking to meet your needs or whether a paid app delivers more for your money. You should also figure out if a browser extension will take care of your ad-blocking needs or whether you should consider switching browsers to one with more built-in privacy features.

You can narrow down your choice in ad blockers by deciding specifically what you're looking to accomplish with such an app or extension. Do you just want to stop annoying pop-up ads from appearing or do you want the full range of services, including privacy features and an end to ad-tracking? Grab the ad blocker that ticks off all the boxes on your wishlist.

Some ad blockers, such as AdBlock Plus include filters and the ability to let in non-obtrusive advertising. Others, like AdBlocker Ultimate, take a more aggressive approach. Find out which one best suits your needs and comfort level.

  • kep55
    I'm waiting for an ad blocker that will spoof the websites into thinking there is no ad blocker in place. More and more sites are incorporating code that disables the site entirely or many of the features if an adblocker is in use.
    Reply
  • VonMagnum
    kep55 said:
    I'm waiting for an ad blocker that will spoof the websites into thinking there is no ad blocker in place. More and more sites are incorporating code that disables the site entirely or many of the features if an adblocker is in use.

    I agree. What good is an ad blocker that only gets you locked out of perhaps 70% of all Internet sites you want to visit? I believe HTML5 is directly responsible. Only after it came into general use were sites magically able to detect you are using an ad blocker. Web pages used to be simpler. I remember loading them on 56kbps modem in the 1990s. Now, to read a 2 kilobytes of TEXT, I have to load 5 megabytes or more of cumbersome web pages graphics and ads when all I care about is the 2 kilobytes of text that actually compromises a typical news article, for example. THAT is progress?

    Meanwhile, I've found "Techblocker" to be better than any of the above ad blockers as it actually bypasses the ad blocker detecters on over a dozen major sites (including Yahoo Mail), but I think it's only available for Chrome at the present time (itself an inside source of info for Google itself). Ironically, it still didn't block the detection on Tom's Guide here, but then I find it ironic this site has an article on the best ad blockers while using an ad blocker detecter itself.

    The truth is if web sites loaded static photo ads (like quaint newspaper ads) in pre-loaded image sized forms (that didn't cause web pages to "jump" like crazy as it loads yet MORE ads for the same 2K of news text), most people wouldn't even feel the need to "block" ads. But greed is an infinite black hole that can never be filled and so it's abused to the point where we need an ad blocker just to keep our 2-year old phones from crashing from running out of memory when we only want to read that 2k of text! It's miserable. But when one of the world's greatest web browser creating companies is also the world's greatest seller of ads (Google Chrome and Google/Alphabet), some might say there's a conflict of interests happening at the very least. What else can the average person do but find a way around the roadblocks? They want to guilt us for using ad blockers, but they don't care if they send us 5000x the actual information content in the form of ads and make us pay to receive it as well (bandwidth).
    Reply