Best Peloton alternatives 2024 for at-home cardio workouts

Best Peloton alternatives: quick menu

The best Peloton alternatives are a great way to boost your cardio fitness at home, away from the brand's unique aesthetic, instructors, and expensive equipment. And we've put these Peloton alternatives to the test to help you find the right bike for your goals.

We felt that the MYX II Exercise Bike deserved it's spot as the best Peloton alternative overall. The bike has the same high-quality design, a built-in display, and virtual classes. But it also focuses on personalizing the experience to your body and performance. 

If you're after something a bit less expensive, the Echelon Ex-3 Smart Connect Bike offers a Peloton-style experience, but you'll need to provide your own display as the bike doesn't come with one. But for the price, it's not just a good Peloton alternative, it's also one of the best exercise bikes around

However, these aren't your only choices, as we've rounded up the best Peloton bike alternatives available right now, from premium options to fully-featured Bike+ alternatives to help you get that cardio boost without leaving the house. 

The quick list

Best Peloton alternative overall

Side view of MYX II Exercise Bike in a living room

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best Peloton alternative for most people

Specifications

Resistance: Friction
Display: Yes, 21.5-inch touchscreen
Size: 54 x 21.6 x 46.8 inches
Subscription: $35 per month

Reasons to buy

+
Large display
+
Personalized training recommendations
+
More like a virtual personal trainer

Reasons to avoid

-
Fewer classes than Peloton
-
Friction resistance system

After working out with the MYX II Exercise Bike, we felt that it is the best Peloton Bike alternative overall. You'll still need to take out a monthly subscription on top of the initial investment cost, and there are fewer classes, but the MYX's personalized approach really pays off. 

If Peloton thrives on the group environment, MYX takes a more customized path, so you feel like you're working out with an on-demand personal trainer instead of a fitness instructor. But there are still classes too, which is one of the reasons this is such a compelling alternative. 

Plus, you can use the large display to do spin classes, off-bike strength training, and cycling workouts. And for those bike-free workouts, you can swivel the display, so you don't need to load up the app on your phone or another display — just roll out a mat and you're good to go. 

During testing, we liked that the bike was adjustable so that you can easily find the perfect set up, even if you're sharing the equipment between multiple people. However, the main difference between this and the Peloton bikes is the resistance system; Peloton opts for magnetic resistance, while MYX uses friction-based.

Best budget Peloton alternative

Echelon Ex-3 Smart Connect Bike set up in a garage

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best budget Peloton alternative

Specifications

Resistance: Magnetic, 32 levels
Display: No
Size: 59 x 23 x 53 inches
Subscription: $39.99 per month

Reasons to buy

+
Quiet resistance system
+
Easy to assemble
+
Can use your own device as a display

Reasons to avoid

-
Resistance adjustment can be difficult
-
Seat isn't comfortable for long periods
-
Doesn't have a built-in display

The Echelon EX-3 is $250 cheaper than the entry-level Peloton Bike, but it still rivals Peloton's resistance system with 32 levels of near-silent magnetic resistance for you to increase the intensity of your ride. 

It's a good option if you're on a budget, but you will need to add your phone or tablet, as the bike doesn't come with a built-in display — just a device holder. And you'll need to download the Echelon app (and subscribe) to access the on-demand and live classes. 

The Echelon membership costs $39.99 per month, which also gives you plenty of off-bike routines, including yoga, Pilates, and strength-training workouts. And you can share your membership with up to five other people. 

On paper, it's a very similar experience to the Peloton Bike but for less money. However, we did find that the seat wasn't as comfortable, especially for extended periods, and the resistance mechanism wasn't quite as smooth either. 

Best premium Peloton alternative

SoulCycle At-Home Bike

(Image credit: Equinox)

3. SoulCycle At-Home Bike

Best premium Peloton alternative

Specifications

Resistance: Magnetic
Display: Yes, 21.5-inch touchscreen
Size: 62.2 x 22.2 x 53.5 inches
Subscription: $40 per month

Reasons to buy

+
SoulCycle and Equinox classes
+
Subscription included with Equinox membership
+
No assembly

Reasons to avoid

-
Very expensive
-
No toe cages (requires clip-in cycling shoes)

Before Peloton, there was SoulCycle. The boutique spin brand helped popularize the type of high-intensity cycling classes we now associate with Peloton, but this was largely an in-person experience, until the company partnered with Equinox to develop the SoulCycle At-Home Bike. 

The two brands don't use exactly the same training techniques — Peloton has a large variety, SoulCycle focuses on cardio-based dance workouts you can do on a bike — so whether this will suit you depends on how you like to exercise. 

It's not cheap either. At $2,500 for the bike (at MSRP, though you can occasionally find it for around $1,500), it's more expensive than either of Peloton's bikes. Plus, you need to subscribe to Equinox+ for $40 per month to get access to all the classes on the smartphone app and built-in display. 

It's definitely an expensive option but there is one silver lining: if you're already a member of one of Equinox's 107 fitness centers, then you get complimentary access to Equinox+, which could make it more viable in the long run if you want to augment your in-person sessions with virtual spin classes. 

Best Peloton alternative for multiple users

NordicTrack Commercial S15i/S22i

(Image credit: NordicTrack)

4. NordicTrack Commercial S22i Studio Cycle

Best Peloton alternative for households

Specifications

Resistance: Magnetic
Display: Yes, 22-inch touchscreen
Size: 61 x 22 x 58 inches
Subscription: $396 per year

Reasons to buy

+
360-degree rotating screen
+
Trainer-led resistance feature
+
Incline adjustment

Reasons to avoid

-
Not easy to move around
-
Can't use screen without subscription

While some others on this list compare more closely to the standard Peloton Bike, the NordicTrack Commercial S22i Studio Cycle is a full Peloton Bike+ alternative, and not just because of its almost $2,000 price tag. 

It also has a 360-degree rotating screen and the magnetic resistance system automatically adjusts during streamed classes according to the instructor's guidance, just like the Peloton Bike+ experience. 

But the Studio Cycle also has a feature the Peloton doesn't have: incline adjustment. The bike's incline can be adjusted between -10 and 20 percent while you're working out, helping more closely mimic the road cycling experience should you want it. 

And because the bike is designed for studios (hence, the Commercial Studio branding), it's designed to accommodate riders up to 350 lbs, though to do this, it has a larger footprint than the Peloton bikes and it weighs 200 lbs, so its not easy to move. 

To get access to all of these features, you do need to take out a membership to iFit, NordicTrack's virtual workout app. There used to be different plans depending on how many people you wanted to use it, but now there's a single one-year plan that'll set you back $396 and supports up to five user profiles.

How to choose the best Peloton alternatives

Before you start to consider a Peloton alternative, it's important to nail down what is it you don't like or want from Peloton that makes you want a different exercise bike, as this will help narrow your choices. 

If you're not a fan of the workout style employed by many of Peloton's instructors, then you'll want to look for a smart exercise bike that comes with a variety classes or at least different style of training, like the MYX II Exercise Bike.

It's also important to consider the bike's resistance system. Most smart exercise bikes come with magnetic resistance, except the aforementioned MYX II, which uses a friction-based system instead. 

You should also factor in whether you want the trainer to be able to automatically adjust the resistance for you during a class, so you can focus on your training, like on the NordicTrack Studio S22i Commercial Bike, which shares this feature with the Peloton Bike+. 

But when it comes to a true Peloton alternative, the software is as important as the bike itself. If you're looking to keep the cost down, you can find bikes that allow you to cycle without a subscription. However, most lock features or resistance adjustments behind a monthly or yearly membership, like Peloton does.

FAQs

Is Echelon as good as Peloton?

On paper, Echelon's offerings match Peloton's. Both brands manufacturer high-performance home workout equipment, both have a membership, and both offer live spin classes. 

The main difference is the types of virtual workout on offer. Peloton's primary focus is live classes that you can join to train at the same time as other Peloton users, with a live-updating leader board. 

Echelon does offer live classes, but fewer than Peloton, and the balance tips towards on-demand sessions instead. So, which is best for you will depend on how you like to train; at a pre-scheduled time or when you have a spare moment. 

However, Peloton has a large following thanks to its personable and motivational instructors. Not that Echelon's aren't also great at keeping you moving, but Peloton is known for that experience and each instructor is a celebrity in their own right, with a dedicated following on and off social media. 

James Frew
Fitness Editor

James is Tom's Guide's Fitness Editor, covering strength training workouts, cardio exercise, and accessible ways to improve your health and wellbeing. His interest in fitness started after being diagnosed with a chronic illness, and he began focusing on strengthening his core, taking regular walks around the city, and practicing meditation to manage the symptoms. He also invested in fitness trackers, home workout equipment, and yoga mats to find accessible ways to train without the gym. Before joining the team at Tom’s Guide, James was the Fitness Editor at Fit&Well, where he covered beginner-friendly exercise routines, affordable ways to boost your wellbeing, and reviewed weights, rowing machines, and workout headphones. He believes that exercise should be something you enjoy doing, so appreciates the challenge of finding ways to incorporate it into everyday life through short muscle-building sessions, regular meditation, and early morning walks.

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