The best electric bikes of 2024

The best electric bike for most people



What makes for the best electric bike? With so many models out there, it's hard to know at a glance which model will get you where you need to go and which features you can and can't live without. That's why we've tested a number of the top models across all types of electric bikes to give you the best recommendations for your needs. 

We test the bikes by riding them around, to see how responsive their electric motors are when going up hills and getting started from a dead stop. We also gauge the comfort of the bikes over long miles, and note the ease with which we can use their various features, such as an accompanying smartphone app. And, we also test the bikes' battery life; while endurance is affected by many factors, such as terrain and temperature, we try to the best of our ability to see how the bikes live up to the company's estimates.

While many of the best electric bikes are expensive — upwards of $2,000 — they're coming down in price; in fact, we also have a list of the best budget electric bikes under $1,500. And before you do any riding, be sure to pick up one of the best bike helmets to keep your head safe, and one of the best bike locks to keep your ride secure. 

Read on for all our best electric bike picks. 

The best electric bikes you can buy today

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best electric bike

Rad Power RadCity5 PlusTom's Guide Awards 2022 logo

(Image credit: Future)
The best electric bike for most people

Specifications

Battery: 48V, 14 Ah (672 Wh) (removable)
Max estimated range: 50+ miles
Motor: 750W brushless geared hub motor
Gearing: 7-Speed Shimano Altus
Weight: 64 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Very comfortable to ride
+
Easy to attach accessories
+
Powerful motor

Reasons to avoid

-
Secondary display hard to read in sunlight
-
Cable management could be better

For the vast majority of riders, the Rad Power RadCity 5 Plus will be the best electric bike. It has a comfortable design, plenty of power, and a multitude of mounting points for things such as baskets and child seats. Plus, it comes with a rear rack and mudguards. Its 7-speed shifter, combined with three levels of pedal assistance and a twist throttle is more than enough to get you up even the steepest of hills.

Rad Power says that the RadCity5 should get upwards of 50+ miles on a charge; in our testing, it came fairly close — about 40 miles. 

We really enjoyed pedaling around on this bike, which is offered in both step-through and step-over models. Its battery, while not fully integrated into the downtube, provides plenty of range, and can also be used to charge your phone (with the right adapter). The one caveat is that this bike weighs a hefty 64 pounds, so you're not going to want to lug it up stairs.

At a starting price of $1,999, it's reasonably affordable, but you should check out our Rad Power Bikes promo codes for the latest discounts. 

Read our full Rad Power RadCity 5 Plus review.

Best affordable ebike

Ride1Up Turris parked outside against wall

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
An inexpensive electric bike that hits all the marks

Specifications

Battery: 48V, 12.8Ah Reention Prism, LG cells
Estimated range: 25-45 miles
Max assist speed: 28mph
Motor: 750-watt, 48V Shengyi geared hub motor, 60Nm torque
Gearing: Shimano 7-speed, 11-32 cassette and 44T chainring
Weight: 55 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Good assist power when pedaling
+
Great price
+
Comfortable to ride

Reasons to avoid

-
Suspension fork seems unnecessary

While there are plenty of great electric bikes that cost more than $2,000, the Ride1Up Turris shows that you can get a lot of value from an ebike that costs much less. During our testing, we found the Turris' 750W motor to be more than powerful enough for most situations. We were equally impressed with how quickly it responded when we started pedaling, as many budget ebikes exhibit a slight delay in these situations. (There was a slight lag when using just the throttle, though).

Other standout features include its mechanical disc brakes, easy-to-read digital display, and bright 60 Lux headlight. Included front and rear fenders helped keep our clothes clean on wet days, and its wide, 27.5 x 2.4-inch tires made for a comfortable ride — so much so that we thought that the front suspension felt a bit extraneous. 

There's no taillight, so you'll want to check out our picks for the best bike lights, and unlike some pricier ebikes, you'll have to assemble a few pieces of the bike yourself, including the handlebars, front wheel, and pedals. We also had to make a few adjustments to the fenders, which might mean a trip to your local bike shop. 

But for those who want an affordable electric bike to get around town, the Turris should be at the top of your list. 

Read our full Ride1Up Turris review.

Best fat tire ebike

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

Aventon Aventure (Image credit: Tom's Guide)
This fat tire ebike will get you anywhere you need to go

Specifications

Battery: 48V, 15Ah (removable)
Max estimated range: 60 miles
Max assisted speed: 28 mph
Motor: 750 watts, 48V, rear hub motor
Gearing: Shimano Acera 8-speed rear derailleur
Wheel diameter: 26 inches
Weight: 77 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Very fun ride with excellent pedaling assist response
+
Stable and capable in all conditions, including snow
+
Has both lights and turn signals

Reasons to avoid

-
Very heavy bike
-
Suspension fork is unnecessary

If you're looking for a fat-tire electric bike that's less than $2,000, the Aventon Aventure.2 is hard to beat. It's as good off-road as it is on pavement, has a beefy battery and a clear color display, as well as fenders that'll save your clothes from getting too muddy. Other niceties include a brake-activated rear light and turn signals.

The Aventure.2 has both pedal-assist and throttle modes, and the battery and wires are neatly integrated into the frame. What's more, the battery can be removed for charging. The battery lasted nearly the advertised 60 miles on a charge, but, as with other ebikes, we drained it much faster when we relied on the throttle.

While not as capable as a dedicated mountain bike, the Aventure.2 was able to get us up and over hilly terrain, and its torque sensor was quick to translate our pedaling into power. 

Our only real critiques were the bike's 77-pound weight and its front suspension fork, which felt unnecessary. Otherwise, it's an excellent bike for the price.

Read our full Aventon Aventure.2 review.

best for commuters

Charge Bikes City review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best electric bike for commuters

Specifications

Battery: 418Wh (removable)
Max estimated range: 50 miles
Motor: Bafang rear hub motor
Gearing: Shimano 7-speed
Weight: 45 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Excellent handling
+
Complete set of features

Reasons to avoid

-
Plain styling

If you plan on commuting to work, Charge Bikes City may well be the best ebike for you. Not only does it come with features like full-fenders to keep the mud off and a rear rack for a pack or bag, but it does everything well for a very reasonable price. The Charge City has a five level power assist, as well as a full-power throttle button, should the need or hill arise. 

The biggest reason why we think this bike is best for commuters is that its handle bars fold flat, so you can more easily store it in an apartment or a cubicle at work. It comes with all the necessary bells and whistles a commuter is going to want, including the bell (actually a superior and very loud electronic horn). The bike is available in both step-over and step through, and in a few color options, too.

The City's electric assist is so smooth you'll think you're doing all the work yourself. At night, the bike's lights sufficiently lit up the road and the throttle helped us zip around potential trouble when we felt out of gas. Its advertised range of 50 miles held up, too; we found we only had to recharge the bike every three days using it on our regular commute.

Founded by folks from biking icon Cannondale, Charge's sui generis feature is that even newbies can assemble the bike right out of the box in 10 minutes or less. All you basically have to do is put the front wheel on. 

Read our full Charge Bikes City review

Best BMX-style bike

Juiced RipRacer parked on mountain trail

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
A truly fun fat tire BMX-style ebike for less

Specifications

Battery: 800 aH (removable)
Motor: 1300W (Peak) 750W (Sustained), Rear Hub Motor
Gearing: Single speed
Weight: 66 pounds
Max advertised range: 55 miles
Max advertised assist speed: 28 mph

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful pedal assist with a full-throttle mode
+
Maneuverable
+
Competitively priced

Reasons to avoid

-
No shocks
-
Single speed

The Juiced Ripracer is a lot of fun, and costs a lot less than you might think. It's one of the more affordable offroad ebikes we've tested, and it can go just about anywhere. This fat-tire bike has 20-inch wheels and a 40.3-inch wheelbase that's meant for trails and other unpaved surfaces. However, its lack of shock absorbers, like most e-mountain bikes, means you're in for a rougher ride. 

Its 750W motor delivered some real get-up-and-go, and, thanks to its low-end torque, was great for charging up hills. In one concession to its price, the Ripracer has a cadence, rather than a torque sensor, so you have to rotate the pedals a couple of time before the assist kicks in. As it's a BMX-style bike, the Ripracer is a lot smaller than other mountain e-bikes, which also makes it easier to maneuver around tight spaces. 

Read our full Juiced Ripracer review.

Best under $1,000

Ride1Up Roadster V2 parked outside

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best budget electric bike for city commuters

Specifications

Battery: 36V, 7Ah Samsung 35e Cells
Estimated range: 20-30 miles
Max assist speed: 24 mph
Motor: 500W peak, 350W nominal hub, 40Nm of torque
Gearing: 64/20T singlespeed Toptrans Belt Drive
Weight: 33 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Light
+
Sleek
+
Doesn’t look like an e-bike
+
Fun, zippy ride
+
A great, inexpensive option for city commuting

Reasons to avoid

-
Would prefer disc brakes over the included rim brakes
-
LCD unit is difficult to read

At first glance, the Ride1Up Roadster V2 It looks like a regular, non-motorized commuter bike — the better to blend in with traditional rides — but concealed inside is a battery capable of up to 30 miles of range. 

The Roadster V2 is also one of the lightest ebikes we tested — it weighs just 33 pounds, so carrying it around shouldn't be a problem — and although there's no step-through model, Ride1Up offers it in two sizes to accommodate riders of nearly all heights. 

The Roadster V2 was fast and fun on flat and rolling terrain, and its belt drive made for a very quiet ride. However, this is a single-speed model, so it's a bit hard to get moving on hills. 

There are a few concessions to get to this price: The Roadster V2 doesn't have lights of any kind, nor does it have fenders, and it uses rim, rather than disc brakes. We also found its display to be on the small side. Still, if you can live with those compromises, you'll enjoy the Roadster V2.

Read our full Ride1Up Roadster V2 review.

Best cargo ebike

Radpower RadRunner 3 Plus e-bike in backyard

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best cargo ebike

Specifications

Battery: 672Wh, removable
Max estimated range: 45 miles
Motor: 750W brushless geared hub motor
Gearing: Shimano 7-speed
Max assisted speed: 20 mph
Weight: 75.5 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Easy to reconfigure for your specific needs
+
Powerful hub motor
+
Throttle adds assist over your pedaling assist when needed

Reasons to avoid

-
Could use a center stand rather than kickstand

How's this for an endorsement? Our reviewer loved this bike so much that he decided to buy one for himself. 

While it can't haul as heavy loads as some other larger (and much more expensive) cargo bikes, the RadPower RadRunner 3 Plus is more than capable of carrying you, your kids, and plenty of groceries wherever you need to go. We loved its responsive 750W motor, its comfortable ride, and its low center of gravity, thanks to its 3.3-inch thick, 20-inch tires.

However, we found it to be fairly heavy, tipping the scales at 75 pounds, so you're not going to want to try pedal it without any power assist. But we found its advertised 45-mile range to be pretty accurate, so long as we didn't go too heavy on the throttle.

Aside from its performance, what made the RadRunner 3 Plus stand out so much to us was its versatility: You can outfit the bike with any number of combinations of racks, seats, bags, and other accessories to truly customize it for your needs. And, its relatively low price for a cargo bike makes it a real bargain for those looking to replace their car with an electric bike.

Read our full RadPower RadRunner 3 Plus review.

Best folding ebike

GoCycle G4i+ parked at Moynihan Train Hall

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best folding electric bike

Specifications

Battery: 10.4Ah, 36V (nonremovable)
Max estimated range: 50 miles
Max assisted speed: 20 mph
Motor: G4 Drive, front hub, 500 watt (US)
Gearing: Shimano Nexus 3-speed
Wheel diameter: 20 inches
Weight: 36 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Futuristic sleek design
+
Easy to collapse and unfold
+
Light

Reasons to avoid

-
Flimsy smartphone holder
-
Mudguards, headlight sold separately

The Gocycle G4i+ looks like something a supercar designer would build, which isn't surprising given that it was conceived by former McLaren sports car engineer Richard Thorpe. Not only is this bike's unique wheels-on-one-side and tapered body eye-catching, but we were able to fold it up in less than a minute into a size small enough to get us on and off a train, and past our security and into our office elevator. At 36 pounds, it's one of the lightest folding electric bikes out there, too. 

Despite that, this bike was a real pleasure to ride. Its electric shifter responded near instantly, as did the pedal assist and throttle. However, while the G4i+ has daytime running lights, you'll have to pay extra for a legit headlight, as well as mudguards. Also, the G4i+ has a great smartphone app, but one of the flimsiest methods of holding your phone on the bike itself — a cheap solution for a bike that costs $7,000. 

If you're looking for something slightly more affordable, GoCycle also sells the G4i ($5,999) and the G4 ($4,799). A 2022 version of the G4 has an injection molded composite mid-frame. Still too much for your wallet? Then you should check out the Brompton Electric C-Line Explore, which starts around $3,000. 

Read our full GoCycle G4i+ review.

Best front-storage cargo bike

Yuba Supercargo CL at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best electric cargo bike

Specifications

Battery: 250W/36V (removable)
Motor: Bosch Cargo Line Cruise Motor+
Gearing: Shimano Deore 10-speed drivetrain
Size: 8.5 feet long
Weight: 88.2 pounds
Range (est): 60 miles

Reasons to buy

+
Stable, fun ride
+
Lots of cargo space
+
Quick, responsive, and powerful motor

Reasons to avoid

-
Bumps can be a bit jarring

The Yuba Supercargo CL can haul an astounding 500 pounds, making it one of the heftiest electric cargo bikes in its class. Yet, it offers a surprisingly stable ride, thanks to its low center of gravity. Its cargo area is very customizable, letting you convert it from a place to carry groceries to a space to tote your tots to soccer practice.  

Magna hydraulic brakes and a Bosch mid-drive motor were very responsive, though the relatively small 20-inch tires and lack of suspension did make bumps feel a bit jarring. The Supercargo CL starts at around $6,000, but is incredibly customizable; you can select from a range of accessories to adapt the cargo area to suit your needs. 

If you're looking for a cargo bike that can haul more than the Rad Power RadRunner 3 Plus, this is the model to consider.

Read our full Yuba Supercargo CL review.

Best for long distances

NIU BQi-C3 Pro E-bike

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Best for long distances

Specifications

Battery: Two 48V, 20Ah removable batteries
Max estimated range: 90 miles
Max assisted speed: 20 mph
Motor: 500W (750W max) rear hub motor, 45Nm torque
Gearing: N/A
Weight: 70.5 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful motor
+
Dual batteries means extended range
+
Deep step-through design is great for riders of varying heights

Reasons to avoid

-
Could use more gears in the drivetrain
-
Heavy for a bike in this category

There's nothing worse when running out of power when riding your electric bike, especially if you're miles from home — and at the bottom of a hill. With its dual batteries, the NIU BQi-C3 Pro is the best electric bike for those who have range anxiety, as it can give you up to 90 miles of range before you need to recharge. And, that's no boast — based on our testing, we found that 90-mile estimate to be pretty accurate, too. 

But range isn't the only thing we liked about the BQi-C3 Pro: It has mechanical disc brakes, front and rear lights, and a rear rack so you can carry things wherever you plan to go. A carbon belt drive is another nice-to-have feature, as it's quiet and easier to maintain than a traditional metal chain. Its step-through design also makes the bike easy to use for riders of all sizes; we tried it with both a 5' 11" rider and a 5' 3" rider, and both found it comfortable. 

Our only real complaint with the BQi-C3 Pro is that at 70.5 pounds, it's one of the heaviest electric bikes we've tested that's not a cargo bike, so this is not a model to buy if you have to go up any stairs. Still, the bike's 500W motor was more than powerful enough to get its bulk moving with ease. 

The bike's regular price is $2,199, but we've seen it on sale during the holidays for as low as $1,299, so wait for a sale to pick it up.

Read our full NIU BQi-C3 Pro review.

Ebike specs compared

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Row 0 - Cell 0 PriceTypeRangeWeight
RadPower RadCity 5 Plus$1,699Commuter50+ miles64 pounds
Ride1Up Turris$1,295Commuter25-45 miles55 pounds
Aventon Aventure.2$1,999Fat Tire60 miles77 pounds
Charge Bikes City$1,799Commuter50 miles45 pounds
Juiced Ripracer$1,499Offroad55 miles66 pounds
Ride1Up Roadster V2$795Road20-3033 pounds
RadPower RadRunner 3 Plus$2,099Cargo45 miles75.5 pounds
GoCycle G4i+$5,999Folding50 miles36 pounds
Yuba Supercargo CL$5,999Cargo60 miles88.2 pounds
NIU Bqi C3 Pro$2,199Commuter90 miles70.5 pounds

What to look for when buying an electric bike

Pedal-assist or throttle?
All electric bikes have what's called pedal-assist; you start pedaling, and the bike's motor kicks in to make your ride a little easier. But you need to put in at least some work: you won't go anywhere unless you pedal. Most electric bikes will also let you set the level of assistance, so you can decide how hard you want to pedal.

However, some electric bikes will also have a throttle. Press a button or push a lever, and the bike will do all the work for you — no pedaling needed! Using a throttle will quickly eat up the battery life on the bike, so you'll get far less of a range if you don't want to pedal at all.

Motor type
Less expensive electric bikes traditionally use a rear hub motor. Mid-drive motors located in the center pedal crank shaft tend to be more expensive but offer better overall balance and smoother shifting. 

Motors are also rated based on their power, measured in Watts. Typically, the least powerful motor will be 250 Watts, but unless you're a very large person or planning to go up really steep hills, the motor size shouldn’t be a major determining factor for your purchase. More important,  there is no industry standard for measuring Watts (is it continuous or peak and if peak, for how long?). So in general, a motor’s Watt rating isn’t a reliable indication of power.

Battery size
Consider where you live. If you're in San Francisco you're going to want more help than if you're cruising around Austin. Watt hours (Wh) is the most important figure for comparison—it takes into account battery output and battery life to give you a better sense of available power. Higher Wh translates into more range. 

Many electric bike makers will also include an estimated range (usually about 40 miles) that you can get off a single charge. You should take this figure with a large grain of salt, as that number is usually determined under ideal circumstances: A fairly lightweight person riding on flat terrain with no wind, and at the perfect ambient temperature for the battery. Range is also dependent on the level of power assist being used, whether full-throttle has been applied and for how long, and your average speed. As they say, your mileage may vary.

Removable or built-in battery?
Most bike batteries will handle rides of about 40 miles and need to be plugged in for at least a couple of hours to get to 80 percent of capacity. So if you have a more demanding commute, consider a model that lets you swap out the battery rather than a bike with an integrated battery. 

Also, if you live in a place where you can't bring your bike inside or get close to a wall outlet (such as if you live in a walk-up apartment), definitely look for a bike with a removable battery. It will make your life a lot easier.

Step-over or Step-through?
Many electric bike makers will offer their bikes in two configurations: Step-over (which has a top bar that runs parallel to the ground) and Step-through (the bar is angled downwards). Once upon a time, step-through models were traditionally thought of as women's bikes, but that perception is changing. It's generally easier to get on and off a step-through bike, as you don't have to lift your leg over a bar. 

Safety features
If you're planning to ride your electric bike in traffic or in low-light conditions (such as dawn and dusk), it's worth looking for an electric bike with built-in head and taillights. While increasingly common, it's not a standard feature on all models. 

Electric bike FAQ

What are the different types of electric bike?

Generally speaking, electric bikes fall into the same categories as non-electric bikes. Here's a quick summary of some of the kinds of electric bikes you'll find.

Road bike: These are meant solely for riding on roads, and are designed for speed. They will have thinner tires and curved handlebars, so that the rider will be crouched forward. Higher-end models may also be made out of carbon fiber, so as to make the bike as light as possible.

Mountain bike: Designed for off-road use, mountain bikes will have thick, knobby tires, full suspension, and a burlier frame to better absorb bumps and jumps. 

Fat tire bikes: Similar to mountain bikes, fat tire bikes are meant to be ridden off-road, usually on very soft ground, such as mud, sand, and snow. As their name suggests, these bikes have very wide tires — as much as four inches — which helps keep a grip on unsteadier terrain.

City/Commuter bike: Made for urban dwellers who need to get around town, a commuter bike will have tires that are somewhere in between a road and a mountain bike. Generally, the bikes will be configured so that the rider's back is vertical when seated, which gives them a better view of their surroundings.

Cargo bike: These bikes are made for carrying heavy loads, and will have a cargo area either in the front or rear of the bike. Because of the payload area, these bikes often tend to me much longer and heavier — and more expensive — than a typical bike.  

What is a good speed for an electric bike?

In the U.S., electric bikes are limited to 20 miles per hour; that is, they can only provide you with power — either through pedal-assist or with a throttle — until the bike hits 20 MPH. While you can easily go faster than 20 MPH on an electric bike, the rest of that power will have to be provided by you — or gravity. 

How much does an electric bike cost?

Electric bikes range widely in price. Some of the best cheap electric bikes start at around $1,000; you can certainly find models for less, but quality will be less. 

The bulk of electric bikes cost anywhere from $1,500 to around $2,500, and there are hundreds of models in this price range.  

Higher-end and specialized electric bikes — such as cargo bikes — will cost upwards of $3,000, and can easily reach $6,000 to $8,000, which is a sizable investment. 

rules and regulations

There has been a lot of confusion about ebikes (pedal assist versus throttle bikes) and where you can legally ride them. Some municipalities have banned ebikes from bicycle paths, for example. Many places classify ebikes depending on whether they can go full throttle and have a maximum speed of 20 or 28 mph. There are three official classifications:

Class 1: Ebikes that only assist while you pedal, with a top speed of 20 mph.

Class 2: Ebikes with a throttle that don't require you to pedal but have a top speed of 20 mph.

Class 3: Ebikes that only assist while you pedal, with a top speed of 28 mph.

So check your local regulations before you buy. And always wear a helmet.

Meet our testers

Dan Cavallari
Dan Cavallari

Dan Cavallari is the former technical editor for VeloNews Magazine, who currently reviews electric bikes, the best bike lights, best bike locks, and other bike accessories for Tom's Guide. In addition to VeloNews, his work has appeared in Triathlete Magazine, Rouleur Magazine, CyclingTips.com, Road Bike Action, Mountain Bike Action, CycleVolta.com, Tomsguide.com, and much more. 

Dan also hosts two podcasts on his site, Slow Guy on the Fast Ride: One is about cycling and other outdoor activities, while the other looks at mental health issues. Most recently, Dan also covered the 2022 Tour de France. Dan lives outside of Denver, Colorado with his family. 

John Quain
John Quain


John R. Quain has been reviewing and testing video and audio equipment for more than 20 years. For Tom's Guide, he has reviewed televisions, HDTV antennas, electric bikes, electric cars, as well as other outdoor equipment. He is currently a contributor to The New York Times and the CBS News television program. John has also written our guide to the best bike helmets

how we test

All the bicycles in this feature were road (and in some cases, off-road) tested by Tom’s Guide reviewers and staff. 

The testing process begins when we first receive the bike; as most come only partly assembled, we assess the difficulty with which we have to put the final pieces together. Typically, this involves attaching the front wheel, handlebars, and pedals, but some bikes are easier to put together than others. 

Next, we take the bikes for a ride, evaluating their comfort, handling, responsiveness of their motors — some will be faster to apply power than others — as well as how they perform over a variety of terrain and conditions. For example, if we're testing a fat-tire bike, we'll take it off-roading; if we're testing a cargo bike, we'll load it with kids and grocery bags. 

If a bike has headlights and/or taillights, we'll also check to see how bright they are in dimmer conditions. After all, you're not going to only ride it during the day. We'll also try out any other safety features, such as bells and horns. 

We also evaluate the advertised battery range of an electric bike. Many companies will offer, shall we say, optimistic range estimates based on ideal riding conditions: A light rider using the lowest level of power assist, and traveling on a level road in 70-degree conditions. 

But, that's not reflective of real-world use. While it's impossible to replicate the exact same conditions from one bike review to the next, we do our best to provide as much detail in our reviews as to how we rode the bike (terrain, pedal assist levels) to determine how close to accurate the companies' claims are.

Finally, if an electric bike comes with an app — as is becoming increasingly common— we'll test it out too, to see how easy it is to use, and how well it works with the bike itself.