The best massage guns of 2023

Best Massage Guns
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

The best massage guns work on sore and aching muscles, helping you prioritize exercise recovery without eye-watering massage therapist fees. 

According to the Cleveland Clinic (opens in new tab), research has shown that massage guns deliver targeted percussive therapy directly to your muscles, helping to soothe DOMS, improving muscle recovery, and increasing range of motion and blood flow. That said, you should err on the side of caution if you suffer from an existing injury or lower back pain. 

Not for you?

Check out the best foam rollers here, as well as the best yoga mats for unwinding on. 

We all skip a cool down now and again but you won't want to skip out on the best massage guns. Handheld percussive therapy combines quick pulses of pressure with vibration, and some models have several attachable heads to target specific muscles, different speed settings, and even extension ranges to increase power. 

They might look — and sound — unnervingly like a drill, but the best massage guns on the market are capable of penetrating deeply into muscle tissue. We decided to put some of the best-selling popular massage guns to the test, marking them against performance, noise, and battery life. Unsure how to use them? We cover that, too, as well as all the times when you shouldn't use a massage gun.

The best massage guns you can buy today

Why you can trust Tom's Guide Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

a side-on photo of the Hyperice Hypervolt Go 2

(Image credit: Future/Tom's Guide )
The best massage gun for travel

Specifications

PPM: 2200-3200
Noise level: Up to 65 decibels
Battery life: 3 hours
Weight: 1.5 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
More affordable than other massage guns on this list
+
Lightweight and comfortable to hold
+
Quiet
+
Comes with two massage heads, and charging adaptors

Reasons to avoid

-
No Bluetooth
-
The app isn’t great
-
No carry case

The Hyperice Hypervolt Go 2 is an affordable, lightweight massage gun that packs a powerful punch. It costs around the same as the Theragun Mini, but unlike the mini, it comes with two different attachments, has a 180-minute battery life (compared to the Mini’s 150-minutes), and has a top speed of 3,200 pulsations per minute (compared to the Mini’s 2,400). It’s also got a more traditional massage gun design, which allows you to hold it in different positions to really work into tired, sore muscles. 

At 1.5 pounds, the Hypervolt Go 2 is seriously light. Surprisingly light, in fact, when you consider its top speed of 3,200 PPM — about the same as that of far more expensive, and heftier massage guns on the market. It’s lightweight enough to be portable and is approved by the TSA to stow in your carry-on, however, it doesn’t come in a carry case, which is a little disappointing, especially when the likes of the Theragun Mini does. 

We were impressed with the battery life and weight of this gun, but there are a couple of downsides — the massage gun doesn't have Bluetooth connectivity, so you can't sync it to your app. The app itself isn't all that helpful, especially for beginners. 

Read our Hyperice Hypervolt Go 2 review

An image of the Hyperice Hypervolt 2 Pr

(Image credit: Hyperice)
The best Bluetooth-enabled Hyperice

Specifications

PPM: 1700-2700
Noise level: 55-65 decibels
Battery life: 3 hours
Weight: 2.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Long battery life
+
Solid and sturdy construction
+
Cushion attachment allows for massage in especially tight or bony areas

Reasons to avoid

-
No carrying case
-
Heavy and awkward to hold
-
App can be confusing

The Hyperice Hypervolt 2 Pro is a well-made massage gun, especially suited for athletes and advanced users. The basic yet solid construction of the Hyperice Hypervolt 2 Pro makes it a good choice for nearly anyone looking to invest in a high-end massage gun. However, a few key factors gear the Pro towards a more experienced user.  

The Hypervolt 2 Pro has an exceptional battery life —  at three hours, it outlasts the Theragun Elite and the Theragun Mini by 60 and 30 minutes respectively. The Theragun Pro doubles the Hypervolt 2 Pro’s run time with a six-hour life, but you’ll pay $200 more for that extra three hours. Charging the Pro once got me through an entire week’s worth of testing, with plenty of battery left to spare.  

The Hyperice App is capable of leading accomplished athletes through comprehensive programing for a competitive edge. A variety of textured attachments combined with a speedy 2700 PPM effectively releases the tightest trigger points and muscle groups.  

The downsides here are that the gun is slightly awkward to hold, and doesn't come with a carry case, which could be an issue if you plan on traveling with the gun. Since it’s pretty sturdy, you could most likely get away with cushioning it between some thick sweatshirts and tossing it in your bag. But on the other hand, if I’m going to pay a few hundred bucks for a massage gun, I’d like to know that it could be protected appropriately during transport.

Read our full Hyperice Hypervolt 2 Pro review. 

An image of the Sportneer Deep Tissue Muscle Massager, one of the best massage guns

(Image credit: Theragun)
Best massage gun for beginners

Specifications

PPM: Up to 3,200
Noise level: 35 to 45 decibels
Battery life: Up to 6 hours
Weight: 1.76 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
One of the most affordable massage guns on test
+
Long battery life
+
Quieter than other massage guns

Reasons to avoid

-
Lower amplitude
-
Not as powerful

The Sportneer Deep Tissue massage made this list for its reasonable price, number of attachments, carrying case, quiet level, and being an overall good product for the price. This device is also as lightweight as some “portable” versions, so it’s easy to take outside the home. The Sportneer Deep Tissue Muscle Percussion Massager is a hit among athletes for reducing muscle pain. It comes with six massage heads, five speed levels and has a 11mm stroke amplitude. 

The Sportneer Elite D9 is a fantastic massage gun for the price. During testing, we found that it’s got the battery life of a model that’s nearly five times as expensive, a wide speed range to fit a variety of user preferences and specially designed attachments that allow you to incorporate oils into your massage. On the surface, you may wonder why anyone would shell out hundreds of dollars extra for a more well-known brand.

There are drawbacks, however, the 11mm stroke amplitude means this gun isn't as powerful as other massage guns on the list. That’s not to say that the Sportneer Elite D9 isn’t effective. In fact, it may be a better option for beginners or those with acute pain who need a massage gun that provides a little less intensity.

Read our full Sportneer Deep Tissue Muscle Percussion Massager review here.

A photo of a woman using the Theragun Elite on her legtom's guide top pick

(Image credit: Theragun)
Best Theragun massage gun

Specifications

PPM: 2,400
Noise level: 60-70 decibels
Battery life: 120 minutes
Weight: 2.2 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Ergonomic multi-grip design
+
Closed-cell foam attachments are less painful
+
QX65 motor allows for 40lbs of pressure without stalling or recoiling
+
Comprehensive Therabody app
+
Two hour battery life 

Reasons to avoid

-
Carrying case is bulky

The Theragun Elite may be costly, but it’s a worthwhile investment that can help anyone to move — and feel — better.  The Theragun Elite is a Porsche among massage guns, with a price that’s topped only by another Theragun model (the Theragun Pro).  One thing we loved about the Elite is that it can be held in various ways, allowing users to apply pressure more efficiently and comfortably. Our tester found this multi-grip design especially helpful when targeting hard-to-reach spots, like the lower back and hamstrings. 

The Elite, its five attachments, and a power adapter come boxed inside of a hard shell carrying case with various storage compartments. It’s bulky and would take up a considerable amount of room in your gym bag or suitcase. That being said, if we're paying almost $400 for a massage gun, we'd prefer to have a case that’s bulky and protective over one that’s flimsy and compact. If you’re looking for a massage gun with better portability, take a look at the Theragun Mini. 

The battery life is also pretty impressive on the Elite — one full charge of the battery can get you up to two hours of operation. We also found it doesn't take the Elite long to fully charge, making it a handy option for anyone using the massage gun as a regular part of their recovery routine. 

You might think a hefty price tag would indicate that the Theragun Elite should be reserved for those ready to run their fifth triathlon, but we would argue the opposite. Because of the Therabody App, which provides step-by-step guidance and personalized programming, the Elite is an excellent choice for someone who hasn’t thought about their muscles since high school anatomy class. 

Can't decide between the Theragun Elite and the Theragun Pro — read our face-off here

Read our full Theragun Elite review here. 

An image of the Legiral Le3 Massage Gun one of the best massage gunsbest value awards badge

(Image credit: Theragun)
Best value massage gun

Specifications

PPM: 1,200-3,200
Noise level: 35-55 decibels
Battery life: up to 6 hours
Weight: 4.1 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Quiet
+
Long battery life
+
Lifetime warranty

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavier
-
Not easy to hold

The Legiral has 20 speeds and five interchangeable heads so you can target every inch of your body that ails you. The massage gun boasts a 16mm amplitude (the distance the shaft and attachment travel away from the gun and into your muscle), the same as you’d find on the much pricier Theragun Pro and Theragun Elite. While this is impressive considering its low price, we have to admit that the Le3 didn’t pack quite as powerful a punch as the Theragun models during testing — we had to apply a lot more pressure to get an equivalent massage. That said, we'd also assume having to use more force is worth saving hundreds of dollars.

For a gun that costs under $100, you’d expect the Legiral Le3 to lack a lot of the high-quality properties of its more expensive competitors. But with a well-above-average amplitude, lengthy battery life, an incredibly wide PPM range, and twenty different speed settings, the Le3 holds its own among the more well-known brands. 

However, there are a few aspects that reveal why the Le3 is priced the way it is — namely, a less powerful motor and very light stall force threshold. If you’re a professional or recreational athlete, these weaknesses may be pretty glaring. Even a CrossFit devotee or amateur powerlifter would probably be happier with one of the Theragun or Hyperice models.

Read our full Legiral Le3 Massage Gun review here.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)

(Image credit: Future)
Best massage gun for athletes

Specifications

PPM: Up to 2,400
Noise level: 55 decibels
Battery life: 300 minutes, 150 minutes per battery
Weight: 2.9 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Built-in guided routine presetsQuieter than before
+
New Micro-Point attachment
+
Second battery included

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive

It’s serious athletes the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) might best be suited for, with the premium $599 price tag delivering premium features the average person might not need. That said, new on-screen guidance and an added micro-point attachment, plus 20% less sound, make the latest Theragun Pro one of the best massage guns you can buy.

Though we can’t overlook the cost, it truly is the only qualm to consider. Power, portability and a long-lasting battery life make for another great Theragun percussion device for penetrating those sore muscle tissues. It comes with 6 total attachments, offering options for the recovery you need. In fact, if you're someone who takes their recovery seriously, the high-end Theragun model might be be worthwhile investment for you.

Read our full Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review.

An image of the Mighty Bliss Deep Tissue Back and Body Massager, one of the best massage guns

(Image credit: Theragun)
Best for back pain

Specifications

PPM: 3,700
Battery life: 120 minutes
Weight: 3.65 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
6 Different massage heads
+
Price
+
Lifetime replacement

Reasons to avoid

-
Heavy
-
Doesn’t deliver intense pressure

The Mighty Bliss Cordless Massager is more “massage wand” than “massage gun,” and that difference comes with a few advantages. The long, slim handle makes it easy to target spots that are difficult to address with traditional massage guns, like your lower, mid, and upper back. It’s also a great option for seniors or those with mobility concerns, for whom typical massage gun usage might be challenging. 

But as a general use massage gun, the Mighty Bliss Cordless Massager is lacking. A short amplitude and incredibly low stall force threshold means that the Mighty Bliss’ percussive massage isn’t so mighty after all. While the sensation might feel nice, it’s doubtful that the gun could elicit any real therapeutic results on thicker muscle tissues like the quadriceps, glutes, or even calves.

According to the user manual, you should expect up to four hours of continuous use from the Mighty Bliss before the battery dies. During testing, we got roughly half that, about two hours. Recharging took a respectable 60 minutes (and unlike most massagers, we were still able to use the gun during charging). That’s nearly identical to the far costlier Theragun Elite’s battery life and charge times. So all in all, the Mighty Bliss’ battery performance isn’t too bad. 

Read our full Mighty Bliss Cordless Massager review

An image of the Theragun Mini, one of the best massage guns

(Image credit: Theragun)
Best Theragun for travel

Specifications

PPM: Up to 2,400
Noise level: 50 decibels
Battery life: 150 minutes
Weight: 1.4 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Lightweight
+
Good battery life
+
Compact design and carrying case

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive for what it offers
-
Only one attachment
-
Shorter amplitude and less power than other Theragun models

The Theragun Mini takes all the benefits of percussive massage and wraps everything in a very small and light package. Shaped like a thick and oversized guitar pick, the Mini fits comfortably into your palm and allows you to apply adequate pressure to the muscle groups you’re targeting. The Mini has three speeds: 1750, 2100, and 2400 PPM (percussions per minute). Adjusting the speed is done through a sole button on the side of the device, with three lights indicating the current PPM.

One of the downsides with the Mini is that it only comes with one ball attachment, however, all things considered though, the standard ball is a good catch-all attachment that can be used effectively on most parts of the body. The Mini is also compatible with all of Theragun’s 4th generation attachments, so if you own another current Theragun model, you could always pop any of their attachments onto your Mini. If you don’t, attachments can be purchased separately.   

Where the Mini really excels is in its portability — it can easily fit in most purses, backpacks, and gym bags, and makes taking the massage gun with you to the gym, or to your next overseas marathon a joy. 

Read our full Theragun Mini review here. 

What to look for when buying a massage gun

Some factors you want to think about when buying the best massage guns include how heavy the device is. Although most devices weigh less than five pounds, the difference between a lighter massage gun and a heavier one can mean your arm gets tired faster, especially if you’re holding the device in a hard-to-reach location, like your neck, shoulders and back. 

The best massage guns should have a battery life that lasts longer than an hour, usually up to two hours. You won’t be using vibration therapy for an hour on your body at a time, but not needing to charge the device every time will make life easier. When you’re thinking about buying a massage gun, see if backup batteries are included or are available. If you’re traveling, it might be worth it to have two charged batteries so you don’t have to deal with one leg that’s been worked on and the other leg hasn’t been massaged.

Massage gun customers should also look at the device’s amplitude. This is the distance the head will travel and how deep the gun hits the muscle. A massage gun with a higher amplitude can feel more intense even at a lower speed than a vibration-type massage gun. The massage guns that have higher amplitude should be able to target a specific area deep into the muscle to help reduce muscle pain and improve blood circulation. 

The frequency or speed of a massage gun is usually measured in percussions per minute (PPM) or strokes per minute and tends to be available in the 1,200 to 3,200-PPM range. A higher frequency will deliver a more intense massage. If you want a massage gun that only delivers a surface-level massage instead of a deep, sports-style massage, you would use a lower-power setting on the device. 

If you live in a flat share or in a house with small children, you might want to consider how noisy the massage gun is. Some of them are pretty noisy, which won’t be ideal if you’re using the massage gun in the evenings as part of your recovery routine.

When some consumers are looking at the best massage guns, having a variety of attachments or heads will be important to them. Most devices average about five attachment head options, usually, a cushioned head, rounded, fork, and flat options, as well as some cone-shaped (bullet) attachments that target a specific area.

How to use a massage gun 

For Theragun users, the massage gun is compatible with the Therabody app, which has a number of different suggested routines aimed at problem areas you might want to focus on, like your lower back, or based on your sport, such as cycling or running. It's free to use and worth downloading to make sure you're not focusing on one area for too long. 

If you've not decided on a Theragun, there are some general rules that apply when using all massage guns at home. Firstly, little is more when it comes to using a massage gun. Experts agree that one to two minutes on a large muscle group is more than enough and you'll probably want to use a lower frequency setting unless you've built a lot of muscle (weightlifters, we're looking at you). 

Secondly, no matter how exciting your new massage gun might be, you shouldn't be using it every day. Sports physiotherapists recommend using percussive therapy alongside your other recovery tools, such as foam rolling, or Epsom salt baths. Every few days is enough if you want your massage gun to still be effective. 

Finally, be careful about using your massage gun on pulled or injured muscles, as it can make things worse. If you've run a half marathon and you're not sure whether your calf is pulled or just tight, it's a good idea to wait 48 hours and hit it with the RICE technique (rest, ice, compression, elevation) before reaching for your massage gun. You should also avoid using a massage gun on sprains or inflammation injuries, such as tendinitis and fascitis and it goes without saying, never use a massage gun on broken bones. Massage guns are powerful tools, so if in doubt, check with an expert before using one if things don't feel right.   

Get healthy and in shape with our other fitness gear guides:

Wearables
Best smartwatches | Best running watches | Best Garmin watches | Best sports watches | Best fitness trackers | Best cheap fitness trackers | Best Fitbit | Best cheap running headphones | Best running headphones

Workout equipment
Best treadmills | Best adjustable dumbbells | Best home gym equipment | Best resistance bands | Best foam rollers | Best yoga mats | Best weighted jump ropes | Best smart scales | Best shoes for Peloton and indoor cycling

Apps and exercises
Best workout apps | Best running apps | Best 10-minute ab workout | How to lose belly fat | Best tabata workouts | Best 30-minute workouts | Best beginner HIIT workouts

Jane McGuire
Fitness editor

Jane McGuire is Tom's Guide's Fitness editor, which means she looks after everything fitness related - from running gear to yoga mats. An avid runner, Jane has tested and reviewed fitness products for the past five years, so knows what to look for when finding a good running watch or a pair of shorts with pockets big enough for your smartphone. When she's not pounding the pavements, you'll find Jane striding round the Surrey Hills, taking far too many photos of her puppy.