Best Smart Locks of 2018

Product Use case Rating
August Smart Lock Best Overall 9
Schlage Connect Touchscreen Deadbolt Best Value 8
Schlage Sense Smart Deadbolt Siri Friendly 7
Yale Real Living Key Free Touchscreen Deadbolt T1L No Keys Required 7

After reviewing numerous smart locks from several well-known brands, our top pick is the August Smart Lock Pro, which was easy to install, has a number of optional accessories (such as a keypad and doorbell camera) and can be connected to a wide range of smart home systems, such as Alexa, Google Home, and Nest. The Schlage Connect Touchscreen Deadbolt is a good option for those looking to save some money. However, it only works with Alexa, via the Samsung SmartThings or Wink hub.

Latest News & Updates (May 2018)

  • Schlage's Sense Smart Deadbolt is now compatible with Google Home; once paired, consumers can say to Google Assistant-enabled devices "Ok Google, lock my door," and check to see if their door is locked. However, you'll also need the Schlage Sense Wi-Fi Adapter ($69) to enable this functionality.
  • "Alexa, unlock my door" can now be used to unlock August, Schlage, and Yale Assure smart locks. However, users of these locks will need to say a unique PIN before Alexa will unlock the door.
  • We've reviewed Amazon Key, a service which combines a smart lock and Amazon's Cloud Cam security camera, which lets approved delivery people to drop off Amazon Prime packages inside your front door.
  • The Nest x Yale lock—the first third-party device that can be controlled using the Nest app—is now available. It comes in nickel, bronze, or brass, and when paired with the Nest Connect (a bundle costs $279), you can control the lock remotely from your smartphone.

MORE: Smart Home Guide: What to Know Before You Buy

The August, which looks like a round cylinder, replaces just the inside portion of your deadbolt, so that you can keep using your same key. It has an automatic lock and unlock feature, handy for when your arms are full. A Doorsense module also lets you know if you've left the door open. While it lacks a built-in alarm, this lock has its own app, and works with both Android and iOS devices. It's compatible with HomeKit, Nest and Xfinity, but doesn't work with other smart home hubs. August bundles the Smart Lock Pro with a Wi-Fi bridge so that you can control and monitor your door remotely, and also sells an optional keypad ($79) and doorbell camera ($199).

If someone tries to jimmy this lock or force their way in, this Schlage will emit a piercing siren, which will warn away any intruders. This lock also has the highest possible security rating. You can program in up to 30 codes, and the touch screen is smudge- and fingerprint-resistant. The Touchscreen Deadbolt doesn'’t have its own app, but you can connect it to a smart home hub to control it remotely.

This HomeKit-compatible lock lets you use Siri to open your front door; too bad it doesn't work with other smart home hubs, like the Schlage Connect. It can be programmed with up to 30 different codes. It also has the highest possible security rating, and an alarm if someone tries to break in.

Forget your keys? No problem. In fact, the T1L doesn't even have a key slot, making it potentially more secure from burglars who might try to pick the lock. You can program up to 25 codes, and the lock's small and stylish design will blend in nicely with any décor. While it doesn't have a standalone app, the T1L can be connected to, and controlled by, several different smart home systems. If the batteries inside the lock die, you can connect a 9-volt battery to gain temporary access to your house — a nice feature.

How We Test Smart Locks

To gauge the effectiveness of all the locks, we time how long it takes to install each on a door and how easy the directions are to follow. We then evaluate them on their features, including security (alarms, tamper-resistance), the number of codes you can program into each, and smart home compatibility.

What to Look for When Buying a Smart Lock

Lock Types and Styles

At their most basic level, locks are generally divided into two categories: deadbolts and lever-style locks. A deadbolt only has a keyhole or touchpad, and requires a separate lever for you to actually open your door. A lever-style lock has the lever, the keyhole, and the keypad all contained in one unit. In most cases, a deadbolt will be the best option. As you’ll most likely be replacing a traditional deadbolt, installing a smart deadbolt will require the least amount of work. 

Like their traditional counterparts, most smart locks come in a variety of finishes and styles, so you can pick the one that best matches your home's décor.

Keypad

Another option you’ll want to consider is whether you want a lock with or without a traditional key, or with a keypad. For example, the Yale Real Living Assure Lock Touchscreen Deadbolt has both a keypad and a key; however, Yale also makes models that are key-free, meaning they only have a keypad. Meanwhile, the Kwikset Kevo deadbolt lacks a keypad, so you’ll either need a key or your smartphone to unlock your door. Still others, such as the August, have an optional keypad.

A keypad gives you the option of assigning codes to different people, so you don't have to hand them a physical key, or have to remember to bring a key with you when you leave your house. However, keypads take up much more space on your door, and there's the chance, however remote, that a thief can guess your code to get into your home.

Alarm

Another good feature to look for is a built-in alarm that will sound when someone tries to forcibly open the lock; the better locks will have this feature, plus the ability to adjust the sensitivity of the alarm.

Smart Home Compatibility

Most smart locks—such as those that have Z-Wave or Zigbee—don't have a dedicated app, so in order to control them from your smartphone or smart home system like Alexa, you'll have to connect them to a smart home hub, such as Samsung SmartThings, Wink, or the Amazon Echo Plus. Locks that fall into this category include the Schlage Connect Touchscreen Deadbolt, and the Kwikset SmartCode 910, 912, 914 and 916 smart locks.

Smart locks that work with Apple HomeKit will use Bluetooth to communicate with Apple's smart home platform. As a side benefit, many of these locks also have their own smartphone app—usually for iPhones and Android—so even if you don't hook them up to a smart home system, you can still control them locally using your phone. Locks in this area include the August Smart Lock, the Schlage Sense Smart, Kwikset Kevo and Premis, and the Yale Real Living Assure locks—which can also be upgraded with a Z-Wave or Zigbee module.

Several smart lock makers also sell accessories to bridge the gap between their locks and your home Wi-Fi network—thus allowing you to monitor and control the locks remotely. Examples include the August Connect ($79) and the Schlage Sense Wi-Fi adapter ($69).

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  • actionlock
    Thanks for sharing this helpful information about smart locks on the market. All the smart locks you have described above are very secure and their features are awesome.
  • stkelly612
    Is there any of these that would maybe be able to provide a Bluetooth alert to a phone if tampered with? I want to use one of these on a closet door as a gun safe of sorts, but would be great to know if someone (kids) are screwing with it.
  • REMOTIZER
    I enjoy tapping my key fob velcroed to my car's visor as I pull into my driveway. My front door's key fob uses RFID, similar to the key fobs cars and garage door openers have used for decades. At DEF CON 2016, they proved just how easy it is to hack a Bluetooth or "IP" enabled "smart locks". At under $50, I've enjoyed mine since 2005.
  • Whacko Wayneo
    Schlage Connect does have an App for local interface. I use a Wink 2 Hub for remote access with the Wink app.
  • rcfant89
    What do you think about the Ultraloq UL3 BT: https://goo.gl/WB8fjt ?

    All of these (minus the padlock) are deadbolts, what about non deadbolt locks? I need a regular door handle smart lock. The one linked above seems to be the best I can find but I am disappointed that it can't be remotely accessed (from work, not Bluetooth range).

    I know they say they are rolling out a bridge for the device but that's not until October, best case scenario and costs another 50 bucks and needs a power outlet.

    I'd really love a smartlock with the following specs:
    1. Weatherproof (for outside door)
    2. Regular door handle/knob, no deadbolt (for garage/building door)
    3. Fingerprint + Pinpad
    4. Remote accessible

    Can you recommend something better than the above?
  • mprospero
    Anonymous said:
    What do you think about the Ultraloq UL3 BT: https://goo.gl/WB8fjt ?

    All of these (minus the padlock) are deadbolts, what about non deadbolt locks? I need a regular door handle smart lock. The one linked above seems to be the best I can find but I am disappointed that it can't be remotely accessed (from work, not Bluetooth range).

    I know they say they are rolling out a bridge for the device but that's not until October, best case scenario and costs another 50 bucks and needs a power outlet.

    I'd really love a smartlock with the following specs:
    1. Weatherproof (for outside door)
    2. Regular door handle/knob, no deadbolt (for garage/building door)
    3. Fingerprint + Pinpad
    4. Remote accessible

    Can you recommend something better than the above?


    We haven't tested them yet, but here are several options from Schlage, Kwikset, and Yale that may fit your criteria:
    http://www.schlage.com/en/home/products/FE599NXCAMFFFACC.html
    http://www.kwikset.com/products/styles/smartcode-lever-with-home-connect.aspx
    http://www.yalehome.com/en/yale/yalehome/residential/yale-real-living/levers/
  • rcfant89
    Thanks. I like the last one. It's $240 and doesn't have fingerprint readers though. Hmmmm. Thanks for the reply.
  • johnavil
    Of all the top three locks, the August wins it hands down for me. The fact that is has an app and unlimited codes seals the deal. PLUS I don't have to put an ugly keypad lock on the outside of my door. The Smart lock mounted to the inside of my front door in less than 15 minutes. I was even surprised that I didn't have to drill any new holes. The only thing that took a while was for me to figure out that the round panel was held on with magnets and that's where the batteries were.

    Other than that. It's super sleek, simple and linked with my Alexa and Apple homekit easily.
  • koreamigo
    Well... I see this article about removing the APP / WIFI connection function for the fingerprint door lock. Hope this help. https://www.smartkeylesslock.com/why-not-app/
  • koreamigo
    Anonymous said:
    I can't post links.


    What's wrong? Anyway, if you check out that link. You will see this:

    if you use APP, your password and all your private door security information will be upload to the web server. So it is providing a very good chance for the bad guys to hack the server and get all your info. And the APP admin can get all your door opening information. And if you lost phone, your house would be insecure, because someone may use your phone to open door.

    And other information.