Best video doorbells in 2024: Ring, Nest, Arlo and more tested

If you want to stop porch pirates and package thieves—or simply want to know who's knocking—one of the best video doorbells could be the answer. A smart video doorbell can alert you to a person's presence, and let you see and talk to them through your smartphone. In these times of social distancing, it's also a handy feature if you want to talk to a visitor, but want to keep your door closed. 

Many of the best video doorbells can also now detect packages, so you'll get an alert if something is dropped off at your door. That way, you can pick it up quickly — before someone else does. 

After testing dozens of video doorbells, we think the best overall is the Ring Battery Doorbell Plus. It's reasonably priced, can be hardwired or run off batteries alone, offers clear head-to-toe video, and has package detection. However, you'll need to sign up for a subscription for that last feature. If you'd rather not, we recommend the Eufy Video Doorbell Dual, which gets you all that, without the recurring monthly fee. 

For a deeper dive between the top two brands, be sure to check out our comparison of Ring vs. Nest video doorbells, as well as our best Ring Video doorbells page, which examines every Ring video doorbell in depth. 

Read on for all of our favorite video doorbells.

The quick list

The best video doorbell

Ring Battery Doorbell Plus installed on a door frame

(Image credit: Kelly Woo/Tom's Guide)
Best video doorbell for most people

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1536 x 1536
Field of View: 180 degrees (diagonal)
Works with: Amazon Alexa
Size: 5.1 x 2.4 x 1.1 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/Yes
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $4/month (single camera)

Reasons to buy

+
Expansive vertical view
+
1536p HD video
+
Easy to install and use

Reasons to avoid

-
Spotty package detection
-
No local storage

The Ring  Battery Doorbell Plus is only the second of Ring's video doorbells that offers a head-to-toe view of your front door — and is the first battery-powered model to do so. And, it's one of the few Ring doorbells with package detection, so you'll know when there's a delivery at your door. 

The Ring Battery Doorbell Plus delivered a sharp and clear image, and visitors could hear us clearly. We also liked that its battery was removable, so that we didn't need to take the entire unit off our door when it needed a recharge. 

Our only real issue was that the package detection could be a bit spotty at times. And, there's no local storage, so if your internet connection goes down, it won't record who's at your door. Otherwise, we came away impressed with all it could do.

If you want to go with an upgrade pick, the Ring Battery Doorbell Pro ($229) has all of the features of the Ring Battery Doorbell Plus, but also includes 3D Motion Detection and Bird's Eye view, two features found on the more premium Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2

Read our full Ring Battery Doorbell Plus review

Best video doorbell value

Wyze Video Doorbell Pro on doorframebest value awards badge

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best wireless video doorbell under $100 with package detection

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1440p
Field of View: 150 x 150-degrees
Works with: Alexa, Google Assistant
Size: 5.5 x 1.8 x 1.1 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/Yes
Package detection: Yes with subscription
Starting Storage Fee: $1.99 per month

Reasons to buy

+
Comes with chime
+
Battery/hardwired option
+
Package and person detection

Reasons to avoid

-
No local storage
-
Requires subscription to access all features
-
Had to remove entire assembly to recharge

The Wyze Video Doorbell Pro is the best video doorbell under $100; while it's not perfect, it offers a lot for the money. You get a doorbell that can be wired or run on battery power alone, an included electronic chime, and package detection. We also liked that the Wyze's camera has a 150 x 150-degree field of view, which means you see as much vertically as you do horizontally — this also means you see more of your front stoop.

However, to use package detection, as well as save recordings, you'll need a Wyze Cam Plus subscription, which at $1.99 per month is cheaper than the competition. Also, you need to remove the entire unit when you need to recharge its battery — which means you'll be without a doorbell for an hour or so. The Wyze Video Doorbell Pro doesn't look as nice as some of the other models, but for $89 — which includes a wireless chime — it's something we can overlook.

Read our full Wyze Video Doorbell Pro review.

Best video doorbell without subscription

Eufy Video Doorbell Dual on door frame

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
A second camera lets you see packages clearly — with no subscription

Specifications

Video Resolution: Front Camera 2K (2560 ×1920), Package Camera 1080p (1600 × ️1200)
Field of View: Front Camera 160°, Package Camera 97°
Works with: Alexa, Google Home
Size: 6.5 × 2.1 × 1.1 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/Yes
Package detection: Yes
Local storage: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: none

Reasons to buy

+
Easy installation
+
No subscription fees
+
People & package detection works well
+
Video stored locally

Reasons to avoid

-
No HomeKit support
-
Non removable battery

Package theft is an all-too-common problem, and the best video doorbells have adapted with cameras that can better see more of your front porch. The Eufy Video Doorbell Dual takes things one step further, with a second camera that points directly downward, giving you the clearest view possible. What's more, it also comes with package detection, so you'll get an alert when something gets dropped off. In our tests, it worked flawlessly.

Even better: You get all this without needing to pay a monthly subscription fee, which is a rarity among the best video doorbells. We also liked that the Eufy saved video to a local, secure base, so that it can continue to record video even if your internet connection goes down. Yes, the Eufy costs more upfront, but it could save you money in the long-term.

Read our full Eufy Video Doorbell Dual review.

Best Nest video doorbell

Best video doorbells: Nest Doorbell (battery)Editor's Choice

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best Nest video doorbell

Specifications

Video Resolution: 960 x 1280/ 30 FPS
Field of View: 145 degrees
Works with: Alexa, Google Assistant
Size: 6.3 x 1.8 x 0.95 inches
Wired/Battery: yes/yes
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $6/month, $60/year for 30 days video

Reasons to buy

+
Great design
+
Very sharp video quality
+
Free person, animal, package, vehicle detection
+
3 hours of video storage free
+
Works as both battery or hardwired

Reasons to avoid

-
No optional chime
-
Limited accessories

The Nest Doorbell (battery) gets almost everything right. Its 3:4 vertical aspect ratio means you can see more of your front door; it can work either wired or on battery power alone, and it has a lot of great features, such as the ability to recognize familiar faces, packages, animals, and vehicles.

Even better is that the camera also offers some of those features for free, as well as three hours of rolling video storage — things that used to require a subscription. If you want longer storage, you can still sign up for Nest Aware, which starts at $6/month. However, the Nest doorbell's battery is not removable, so if you need to recharge it, you have to remove it from your door, which can be a pain.

Read our full Nest Doorbell (battery) review.

Best Ring under $100

best video doorbells: Ring Video Doorbell (2nd generation)

Ring Video Doorbell (2nd generation) (Image credit: Future)
The best value Ring video doorbell

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1080p
Field of View: 160 degrees
Works with: Alexa, Google Assistant, Nest, IFTTT
Size: 5.05 x 2.50 x 1.08 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/Yes
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $30/year for 60 days video

Reasons to buy

+
Inexpensive
+
Customizable motion zones
+
Good-quality video
+
Works wired or battery powered

Reasons to avoid

-
No pre-roll feature

If you want to go with Ring, the Ring Video Doorbell (2nd generation) is the best option for most people. It costs less than $100, has a 1080p camera, as well as improved night vision and better motion-tracking capabilities. It's still the best video doorbell for those on a budget.

Like the Ring Video Doorbell 3 and 4, we like that you can use this model either wired or on battery power alone, and you can create custom motion zones, and also see what's going on in your neighborhood. Plus, Ring offers very affordable video storage plans starting at $30 a year. Ring also added package detection for this model, bringing its feature set more in line with the competition.

Read our full Ring Video Doorbell (2nd gen) review.

Best wired-only video doorbell

Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2

RIng Video Doorbell Pro 2 (Image credit: Ring)
Sees more of your front porch

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1536 x 1536
Field of View: 150 x 150 degrees
Works with: Alexa, Google Home, IFTTT
Size: 4 x 1.8 x 0.88 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/No
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $30/year for 60 days video

Reasons to buy

+
Shows more of front porch than other Ring cameras
+
Great video quality
+
Slim design

Reasons to avoid

-
Wired only

The Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2 is the first from the company that has a square aspect ratio, which means the video is as tall as it is wide. What that means is that it can show much more of your front stoop than other Ring doorbells — so you're more likely to see when a package has been dropped off. Better yet, Ring added package detection, so you know when something arrives. It also has customizable motion zones and a new "radar" feature that helps cut down on unwanted notifications. 

The Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2 delivered excellent video quality, was very responsive, and wasn't too hard to install. Just know that it's not battery-operated, and you'll also need to subscribe to a Ring Protect plan (starting at $3/month or $30/year) if you want to get the most out of the video doorbell. 

Read our full Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2 review.

Best video doorbell for apartments

Ring Door View Cam

(Image credit: Ring)
Best for apartment dwellers

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1080p
Field of View: 155° horizontal, 90° vertical
Works with: Alexa, Google Home, IFTTT
Size (Indoor): 2.3 x 4.4 x 1.2 inches
Size (outdoor): 3.8 x 1.9 x 0.78 inches
Wired/Battery: No/Yes
Package detection: No
Starting Storage Fee: $30/year for 60 days video

Reasons to buy

+
Simple to install, replacing an existing peephole viewer
+
Good video quality
+
Works with Alexa

Reasons to avoid

-
Needs to be recharged every month, depending on use
-
Storm door can block night view
-
Doesn't work with Google Assistant

If you're looking for a video doorbell, but rent an apartment or live some place where you can't install a traditional video doorbell, the Ring Peephole Cam is your best alternative. This device replaces your traditional peephole with a camera that can record visitors coming to your door. It proved to be such a popular model that Ring brought it back in 2023 after discontinuing it in 2022 — and now it's at a lower price of $129.

We found the Ring Peephole Cam was easy to install, and recorded very good 1080p video. However, if you have a storm door, the camera's video will be partially obscured, especially at night, when it reflects off the glass of the door. And, because the Peephole Cam is battery-powered only, you may find yourself recharging it more often than the advertised 20-40 days. Good thing spare batteries are just $30. 

Read our full Ring Peephole Cam review.

Best Homekit-compatible video doorbell

Ecobee smart doorbell camera

(Image credit: Future)
Best video doorbell for HomeKit users

Specifications

Video Resolution: 1080p
Field of View: 175º vertical
Works with: Alexa, HomeKit
Size: 5.3 x 1.9 x 1.1 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/No
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $5/month/30 days video

Reasons to buy

+
Package detection
+
Integrates with Ecobee thermostat
+
Works with Alexa and HomeKit (Google soon)
+
Attractive

Reasons to avoid

-
Subscription costs a little higher than the competition
-
Wired-only

The Ecobee Smart Doorbell Camera is one of a very limited number of video doorbells that works with Apple's HomeKit. It's also the least expensive and most fully-featured of the bunch, too, with head-to-toe video and person and package detection. 

We really liked the image quality from the Ecobee, as well as the fact that we could answer the video doorbell not just from our phone, but also our Apple Watch and Amazon smart displays (Google support is in the works). Its package detection was also really helpful, as was a beta feature that automatically pans and zooms in on a subject as they approached our front door. 

Unlike the Logitech Circle View Doorbell, which lets you use your Apple iCloud account to store video, Ecobee requires that you use its own subscription service (starting at $5/month) if you want to save videos and have access to such features as package detection. That's not as competitive as some of the other video doorbells on this page, but it's the price you pay if you want something that works with HomeKit and has package detection.

Read our full Ecobee Smart Doorbell Camera review.

Best Arlo video doorbell

Arlo Video Doorbell 2K attached to house

Arlo Video Doorbell (Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Wireless video doorbell with package detection

Specifications

Video Resolution: 2K (1944 x 1944)
Field of View: 180 degrees (diagonal)
Works with: Amazon Alexa, Google Assistant
Size: 1.85 x 1.45 x 5.63 inches
Wired/Battery: Yes/Yes
Package detection: Yes
Starting Storage Fee: $5/month (single camera)

Reasons to buy

+
Sharp high resolution camera
+
Works with Google, Alexa, and HomeKit
+
Supports hardwired and battery installation

Reasons to avoid

-
Most useful features are locked behind subscription
-
Bulky
-
Nonremovable battery

Arlo makes some of the best home security cameras, so it should be no surprise that the Arlo Video doorbell 2K makes it on our list of the best video doorbells, too. It's one of the few video doorbells that has a higher than 1080p resolution, so in theory it should deliver a more detailed image than the competition. 

We found that claim to largely be true, especially in daytime, though the difference between it and other video doorbells was less pronounced at night. Arlo's video doorbell also works with Alexa and Google Assistant, so can receive notifications on smart speakers, and livestream video from the doorbell to an Amazon Echo Show or Google Nest Hub smart display.

Arlo's app has a ton of features, but some of them, such as motion sensitivity, are difficult to find. And, for most of the smarter features, including video storage, you need to sign up for a subscription, which starts at $5/month for a single camera, and gets you just 30 days of stored video history — far less than Ring and Nest.  But, if you have Arlo's security cameras, its video doorbell will make an excellent addition, as you can add up to five cameras for $10 a month.

Read our full Arlo Video Doorbell 2K review

Video doorbells compared

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Row 0 - Cell 0 PowerVideo resolutionField of viewPackage detection
Ring Battery Doorbell PlusBattery/wired1536 x 1536180° diag.Yes w/ subscription
Wyze Video Doorbell ProBattery/wired1440p150° x 150°Yes w/ subscription
Eufy Video Doorbell DualBattery/wiredFront Camera 2K (2560 ×1920), Package Camera 1080p (1600 × ️1200)Front Camera 160°, Package Camera 97°Yes
Nest Doorbell (battery)Battery/wired960 x 1280145ºYes w/ subscription
Ring Video Doorbell (2nd gen)Battery/wired1080p160ºYes w/ subscription
Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2Wired1536 x 1536150° x 150°Yes w/ subscription
Ring Peephole CamBattery1080p155° horizontal, 90° verticalNo
Ecobee Smart Doorbell CameraWired1080p175º vertYes w/ subscription
Arlo Video Doorbell 2KBattery/wired2K (1944 x 1944)180º (diagonal)Yes w/ subscription

How to choose the best video doorbell

Battery vs. Wired

Video doorbells come in one of two varieties: Wired or battery powered (Some, like the Ring Video Doorbell 4 and the Nest Doorbell (battery) can do both). If you're replacing a traditional doorbell, a wired video doorbell makes the most sense; you just have to make sure that there's enough power going to the doorbell. Typically, there will be an 16-24V transformer providing power, which should be enough for most video doorbells.

If you're planning to install a video doorbell where there is no existing wiring, buying a battery-powered model is far easier (and cheaper) than hiring an electrician. Just remember that a battery-powered video doorbell will have to be recharged occasionally. Some, such as the Ring Video Doorbell 4, have a replaceable battery, so there's no downtime while you're juicing it back up. Some companies also sell solar panels that can help keep the video doorbell's battery charged.

Doorbell placement

Your choice of doorbells will also depend on whether you're replacing an existing doorbell or installing a doorbell where there isn't one already. In general, though, you want the doorbell to be about 4 feet off the ground, so it's high enough to see everything well, but not too high so that its button is hard to push for shorter individuals.

Field of View

Do you want a narrow view of just the person at the door, or do you want to see everything around your entryway? Some video doorbells will offer a wide, landscape view, while others have a portrait orientation; the latter is especially useful for seeing packages dropped off close to your door. 

Video Resolution

The higher the resolution, the sharper the image, which will make it easier to identify people at your door. Most video doorbells now have at least a resolution of 1080p, but it's also worth checking the framerate of the video - the higher the number, the clearer the video should be.

Package, person, and animal detection

It's good to know more than just that there's something at your door; better video doorbells can tell you if a person is approaching, if there's an animal, or if a package has been left at your doorstep. Only a few video doorbells — including the Nest Doorbell (battery), the Arlo Video Doorbell, the Ring Video Doorbell Pro 2, and the Ring Video Doorbell (2nd gen) — offer this feature.

Audio

When the first video doorbells came on the market, they had what's called "half-duplex" audio. That means that when someone is speaking, the other person has to wait until they can be heard. Newer video doorbells now have "full duplex" audio, so you can carry on a conversation as if the person were right in front of you.

Night Mode

The video doorbells we tested take different approaches to capturing video at night. The August Doorbell cam uses motion-activated LEDs to light the area in front of the camera, so it can capture colors a little better. Ring's doorbells use infrared night vision to see in the dark, but the result is monochrome video.

Local vs. Cloud Storage

Video doorbells will store recorded video in a few ways. The two most popular are cloud storage and locally on the video doorbell itself (some models will store video locally, but on a base station in your home). There are advantages and disadvantages to both: If a video doorbell uses cloud storage, then it won't save video if your Internet connection goes down. If a video doorbell has local storage, if someone steals your doorbell, then they can potentially see all your footage.

Subscription fees

Like the best home security cameras, many video doorbells require that you sign up for a monthly or yearly subscription if you want to use cloud storage or access all of the doorbell's features (such as package detection). Typically, a subscription will start at around $3/month; for more details, check out our guide to security camera storage plans compared.

Design

Aesthetics may be a concern. After all, you're bolting this thing to the front of your house! The Ring Pro looks the most like a traditional doorbell, and Ring even includes four faceplates, so you can choose which matches your house's trim or paint one exactly the shade you like.

Video doorbells vs. security cameras

Video doorbells don't necessarily make the best home security cameras. While the apps let you choose to receive motion alerts as well as doorbell alerts, motion-triggered events often resulted in video of a person or car just exiting the frame.

A dedicated home security camera may be a better choice if you're looking for actual security, because you can position such a camera in more places. And when you get a motion alert, you can back up the video and see what happened before the alert came in.

Privacy and law enforcement issues

In most cases, companies that make video doorbells will not share video with law enforcement unless compelled to do so by court order. However, some companies — most notably Ring and Nest — have policies where they will share video without an owner's consent and without their knowledge, if the company deems the incident to be time-sensitive. 

If you do not want your video shared without your consent, you have several options. Arlo and Wyze stated that they do not provide user data without a warrant or court order. Video doorbells that use Apple's iCloud to store video — such as the Logitech Circle View — and Eufy's cameras store user footage through end-to-end encryption, so they cannot even provide user footage to law enforcement even if they wanted to. 

Additionally, you can set up end-to-end encryption on Ring video doorbells, though by enabling this feature, you will disable a number of other Ring camera features.

Frequently asked questions

How much does it cost to install a video doorbell?

Most video doorbells are designed to be self-installed. However, you can hire an electrician to install a video doorbell; costs will vary by region and the complexity of your setup, but we would estimate that it should cost no more than around $200. Some video doorbell companies have partnerships with professional installers. For instance, Ring has partnered with On Tech, which charges $129 to install a Ring video doorbell.

What is the voltage of a video doorbell?

Most wired video doorbells are designed to work on a 16-24 volt circuit — the same as traditional doorbells. Typically, the wires leading to your doorbell will provide the appropriate amount of electricity. If you're unsure, you can use a volt meter to determine if too much or too little power is going to the doorbell.

Can a video doorbell be stolen?

Sadly, yes. Thieves or vandals could rip a video doorbell off your door. However, many video doorbells have measures to help prevent this. For instance, many require you to use a security screw to keep it in place, which requires a special screwdriver provided by the manufacturer.  

How we test video doorbells

To test video doorbells, we self-install the devices on houses and tested in real-world conditions with friends and family ringing the bells day and night. 

To start, we evaluate the ease with which the video doorbell can be installed. This includes the physical installation — are the instructions clear? Are all the necessary tools included? — as well as the process of connecting the video doorbell to our home Wi-Fi network, and to the app itself.

Nest, we examine the video doorbell app itself. How many features does it have compared to the competition? How easy are those features to set up and configure? For instance, many video doorbells let you adjust their sensitivity, so you're not bombarded with notifications every time a car drives by your house. 

Of course, we also look at video and audio quality, both during the day and during the night. Is it easy to recognize a person's facial features while they're moving? How clearly can we hear them, and how clearly can they hear us? And, how quickly does the camera start recording video once it senses movement?

Many video doorbells also require a subscription to access features and save video recordings. We factor in the cost of the subscription, as well as what you get for the price. (Our guide to the best security camera storage plans breaks everything down in detail). 

We also factor in interoperability and compatibility with other smart home devices and security systems. For a video doorbell to be truly part of a smart home, it has to be able to talk to your other smart home devices. 

For more details on our reviews process, please check out the Tom's Guide How We Test page.

More from Tom's Guide

If you're looking to outfit your entire house with the latest tech, check out our other smart home guides.

Mike Prospero
U.S. Editor-in-Chief, Tom's Guide

Michael A. Prospero is the U.S. Editor-in-Chief for Tom’s Guide. He oversees all evergreen content and oversees the Homes, Smart Home, and Fitness/Wearables categories for the site. In his spare time, he also tests out the latest drones, electric scooters, and smart home gadgets, such as video doorbells. Before his tenure at Tom's Guide, he was the Reviews Editor for Laptop Magazine, a reporter at Fast Company, the Times of Trenton, and, many eons back, an intern at George magazine. He received his undergraduate degree from Boston College, where he worked on the campus newspaper The Heights, and then attended the Columbia University school of Journalism. When he’s not testing out the latest running watch, electric scooter, or skiing or training for a marathon, he’s probably using the latest sous vide machine, smoker, or pizza oven, to the delight — or chagrin — of his family.