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Google's 10 Gigabit Internet vs. The World

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 13 comments

If you consistently find yourself frustrated with sluggish Internet speeds, Google may have a solution soon. The search engine giant is working on technology that could offer data rates as fast as 10 gigabits per second-- which it claims is 10 times speedier than today's already blazing Google Fiber.

The project is part of Google's long-term initiative to bring next-generation Internet that can better accommodate data-intensive applications and stable connections. Google Fiber currently offers data transfer speeds that reach 1 Gbps, which is significantly higher than the average US connection speed of 7.2 Mbps, according to ZDNet, and the average global connection speed of 3.6 Mbps, as research firm Akamai noted in its most recent study.

Google's goal of 10 Gbps is certainly speedy, but to put that number in perspective here's how it compares to the fastest average peak Internet connections around the globe.

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Hong Kong

As of Q3 2013, Hong Kong boasts the fastest Internet connections in the world. With an average peak speed of 65.4 Mbps, Hong Kong landed the number one spot in Akamai's quarterly State of the Internet study. This network speed is up by 21 percent when compared to its rates from Q3 2012, and it also nearly quadruples the global average peak connection speed of 17.9 Mbps. Still, considering 1,000 megabits equals one gigabit, it doesn't come close to the Internet speeds Google claims to be working on.

South Korea

South Korea, home to electronics giantsLG and Samsung, boasts an average peak Internet speed of 63.6 MBps. This is a 19 percent increase when compared to its data speeds from the previous quarter.

Japan

Japan ranked third on Akamai's list of the fastest global peak Internet speeds. As of Q3 2013, Japan's fiber optics delivered an impressive 52 Mbps, placing it just under South Korea on the list.

Singapore

Singapore boasted an average peak Internet speed of 50.1 Mbps, nearly tripling the global average peak speed as of Q3 2013.

Israel

A home to many budding startups such as Waze and Outbrain, it's no surprise that Israel offers one of the fastest Internet connections in the world. As of Q3 2013 Israel's peak average Internet connection hit 47.7 Mbps.

The United States resides at number 13 on Akamai's list with an average peak Internet speed of 37 Mbps-- a far cry from the 10Gbps Google hopes to achieve. To put that number in perspective, 37 Mbps equals roughly 0.036 Gbps.

Google's effort is similar to a project in the UK, in which researchers were able to hit data speeds of 10 Gbps through a technology called Li-Fi, which uses light-emitting diodes with flicker adjustments to send out digital information. 

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  • -4 Hide
    thechief73 , February 14, 2014 10:05 AM
    Yeah, and I am going to hover convert my time machine next year for just $39,999.95
  • 4 Hide
    ssalim , February 14, 2014 10:17 AM
    This is awesome. I'm paying almost US$40 per month for 5Mbps down 1Mbps up. What a ripoff.
  • -4 Hide
    bubbawilson , February 14, 2014 10:19 AM
    This is not new 10Gig is normal on fiber it is carrier class.
  • Display all 13 comments.
  • 1 Hide
    austenwhd , February 14, 2014 10:50 AM
    In India, a 3mpbs Unlimited (Unlimited according to my ISP is 25Gb at reduced speed of 144kpbs plus the 15GB allotted download limit at said speed) plan that gives an average speed download speed of 150 kbps cost me $26 a month. Considering, the fact that i spend about $1.53 per GB of download, i call that a serious ripoff. I must sue somebody...
  • 1 Hide
    dragonsqrrl , February 14, 2014 12:38 PM
    It's great that Google is continuing to push the limits of ISP bandwidth, but I wish they would also put an equal effort into broadening the availability of their existing Gb fiber service. It's been limited to 3 cities since it was first announced.
  • 0 Hide
    gm0n3y , February 14, 2014 12:50 PM
    Kudos to Google for pushing the status quo, but I'd rather they rolled out 1gbps to a large number of people than 10gbps to a small number. How about get 1gbps into all of the 1 million+ cities in the US? That would be appreciated I'm sure.*Note: I don't live in the US.
  • -2 Hide
    thechief73 , February 14, 2014 1:11 PM
    I second your statement dragonsqrrl and gm0n3y. That was the point of my vague sarcastic comment, that nobody seemed to get. Google fiber was announced in 2011, meaning it was in development for some time before that. Here it is 2014 and as you said its now in just three dang cities. Woop de do Google. Why even bother talking about 10GB internet? This is one of those "Hey the future is knocking at the door and it will be game changing when it gets here." But we wait and ten years past and were stuck with the same outdated technology and infrastructure from ten plus years ago and at higher prices to boot. Call me when I can sign up for it at respectable prices Google. BTW, peak speed data is pointless, the US is ranked 32nd in average downstream speeds.
  • 0 Hide
    Immaculate , February 14, 2014 3:26 PM
    All you guys complaining about it not being in every city is just ridiculous. It is brand new practically. Kansas City was the first city, I just got this fiber service probably 2 1/2 months ago. Its been in planning here what seems like 2 years or more. In each city not everyone wants the fiber. They have what they call "fiberhoods" in each fiberhood enough people have to actually sign up for their neighborhood to be hooked up to the fiber network. If the minimum isnt met then they move onto the next fiberhood and then hook your neighborhood up after they got all the ones that met their minimums. They give each neighborhood quite a few months to sign up so they won't get skipped.
  • -2 Hide
    Immaculate , February 14, 2014 3:35 PM
    All you guys complaining about it not being in every city is just ridiculous. It is brand new practically. Kansas City was the first city, I just got this fiber service probably 2 1/2 months ago. Its been in planning here what seems like 2 years or more. In each city not everyone wants the fiber. They have what they call "fiberhoods" in each fiberhood enough people have to actually sign up for their neighborhood to be hooked up to the fiber network. If the minimum isnt met then they move onto the next fiberhood and then hook your neighborhood up after they got all the ones that met their minimums. They give each neighborhood quite a few months to sign up so they won't get skipped.
  • 0 Hide
    digitalexplosives , February 16, 2014 9:33 PM
    Come to Australia where you apy $84 a month for 300kbps down... then get rolled by your goverments total stupidity when rolling out a fibre to the premises network.
  • 0 Hide
    James22365 , February 16, 2014 10:56 PM
    It wasn't as bad as the roll you got with the new government canning FTTP altogether.
  • 0 Hide
    pazuso , February 18, 2014 7:57 AM
    I'd much rather see everyone having super stable, low-ping 10Mbps up/down un-capped monthly bandwidth. Games will be more enjoyable, torrents more predictable, streaming media more available.
  • 0 Hide
    Camikazi , February 18, 2014 9:01 AM
    Quote:
    I second your statement dragonsqrrl and gm0n3y. That was the point of my vague sarcastic comment, that nobody seemed to get. Google fiber was announced in 2011, meaning it was in development for some time before that. Here it is 2014 and as you said its now in just three dang cities. Woop de do Google. Why even bother talking about 10GB internet? This is one of those "Hey the future is knocking at the door and it will be game changing when it gets here." But we wait and ten years past and were stuck with the same outdated technology and infrastructure from ten plus years ago and at higher prices to boot. Call me when I can sign up for it at respectable prices Google. BTW, peak speed data is pointless, the US is ranked 32nd in average downstream speeds.
    I am sure local ISPs are fighting Google at every step making it very difficult for them to expand past where they are currently. With that I see no reason why Google shouldn't work on increasing speed while at the same time trying to fight to get into the game in other cities. Remember local ISPs more or less have a monopoly (a legal one) and don't want to give up that control to someone who is giving more for less, they will fight it.
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