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Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review

With incline and roll angle sensors, this could be a lifesaver for off-roaders

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter
(Image: © Autool)

Tom's Guide Verdict

With a combination of internal sensors and GPS, the Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter could be a potential lifesaver for any off-roaders out there. Especially with its support for speed, incline and roll angles.

Pros

  • +

    Uses GPS data

  • +

    Sensors show tilt and roll angle

  • +

    Direct view display

  • +

    Accessory adapter has two USB power ports

Cons

  • -

    Lacks OBD data

  • -

    Tall design obstructs view

  • -

    Lacks phone integration

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter: Specs

Size: 3.3 x 3.2 x 2.2 inches
Weight: 2.9 ounces
Power: 12-volt accessory outlet
Display size: 2.1-inches
Color/Monochrome: Color
Number of parameters displayed: 6
Alarms: No

Autool’s X95 GPS Slope Meter combines data from a GPS module with internal sensors to show speed alongside your vehicle’s incline and side-to-side roll angle. At $65, it can warn that you’re about to tip over, making it a must-have for anyone with a habit of going off-road.

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review: Price and availability

Priced at $65, the Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter can show the driver the current speed and whether the vehicle is about to tip over. The company sells a variety of professional and amateur automotive devices and tools.

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review: Design and features

The Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter is designed for those who spend more of their driving time on dirt trails and mountain ridges than on paved highways. Not only can it show GPS-based speed, a range of internal sensors also measure the vehicle’s incline and roll angles. At 3.3 x 3.2 x 2.2 inches, the X95 is housed in a half-spherical plastic case that weighs just 2.9 ounces. 

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter on dash

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The unit's 2.1-inch direct view color screen is able to show the vehicle’s angles two ways for instant recognition. It shows this as numerical data for side-to-side roll (on top) and front-back incline (below). While the system can warn of speeding, its real value is that the tilt interface warns when the vehicle hits 30 degrees.

Its single interface button is easy to shuffle among the major screen layouts with a short press. The choices range from speed, time, date, the number of satellites in contact and a numeric overview of the unit’s data. A long press of the button opens the settings selections, letting you change units, alarm settings and screen color.

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter on dash

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

In addition to an adhesive pad, the package includes a 12-volt accessory outlet adapter, a 55-inch cable and a shorter one with stripped ends to directly wire into a vehicle’s fuse box. A big bonus is that the adapter has two lit USB-A outlets capable of putting out 2.4 amps - which is plenty for the HUD and a phone or two.

Based on GPS satellite data, the device is restricted to speed, time and distance parameters. The lack of OBD connectivity means there’s no option to display things like Akabane A500’s engine speed and coolant temperature. There’s no phone integration either, meaning the X95 lacks Hudway Drive’s phone-based turn-by-turn directions.

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review: Setup

The Autool X95 sits well on a dashboard, but lacks the adjustable base that other Autool devices have. Because it doesn’t rely on OBD data, the X95 GPS Slope Meter should work with any vehicle on the road today - though it lacks an on/off switch. 

The thick power cable was a little harder to hide in the dashboard than flat wires. The system’s tall design also slightly blocks the view ahead, but there are other HUDs on the market that are noticeably worse.

The X95 GPS Slope Meter unit includes a three-year warranty, making it a long distance runner, as well as a printed eight page start-up booklet. Sadly it lacks any significant online documentation. 

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review: Performance

After I plugged the X95 GPS Slope Meter into my 2014 Audi A4 AllRoad’s cigarette lighter outlet, it took a little more than 3 minutes for the device’s GPS module to contact the closest satellites. It shut off immediately after I shut the car down. 

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter on dash

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

On a long drive, it reacted well to on-the-road changes and accurately recorded the car’s incline and roll angles. A built-in roll-over alarm kicked in when the car hit 30 degrees. Unfortunately the X95 GPS Slope Meter can’t tap into the car’s on-board diagnostics, so it lacks things other HUDs provide, like a tachometer and temperature gauge.

The unit does feature an ambient light sensor, which adjusts the brightness of the display to suit the day or night. On the downside, the screen was susceptible to being washed out and hard to read in direct sunshine.

Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter review: Bottom line

The Autool X95 GPS Slope Meter is a great way to see if your vehicle is getting too close to the edge with an incline and roll angle gauge. However the fact the unit primarily relies on GPS data, and only GPS data, means it llacks feedback about the car’s internal operations. 

The Autool X95 is small and light, and not too expensive at just $65. However it’s primarily aimed at the people who go off-roading a lot, meaning people used to driving on paved roads and highways might be better off buying a different device.

Brian Nadel is a freelance writer and editor who specializes in technology reporting and reviewing. He works out of the suburban New York City area and has covered topics from nuclear power plants and Wi-Fi routers to cars and tablets. The former editor-in-chief of Mobile Computing and Communications, Nadel is the recipient of the TransPacific Writing Award.