Best OLED TV in 2024: Tested and reviewed

Best OLED TV: Quick Menu

The best OLED TV is a prestigious title. OLED TVs are coveted for their excellent picture reproduction, phenomenal motion processing and top-of-the-line upscaling. With unbeatable black levels and perfect contrast, they offer a cinema-like experience for not that much more money than a traditional LED-LCD or QLED TV. 

OLED TVs do face some steep competition from new Mini-LED TVs that offer high levels of contrast and brightness with slightly less impressive black levels. Also, while they're much more expensive, microLED TVs offer an experience greater than OLED TVs but at a price most of us wouldn't dream of spending on a new TV.

The good news is that, for right now, OLED TVs are really the best TV technology at a reasonable price.  The Samsung S95C OLED, our top-rated OLED TV right now uses a QD-OLED panel that's brighter than most other OLED TVs using a WOLED panel and doesn't cost much more than OLED TVs we've seen in past years from the likes of Sony or LG. Want to stick with an LG or Sony? No problem. Both of which have QD-OLED or 3rd-Generation META panel OLED TVs of their own.

At CES 2024, we saw a slew of new OLED TVs that are slated for later in 2024 like the LG C4 OLED, but right now's a great time to buy a new TV if you're shopping the best Super Bowl TV deals.

Written by
Nick Pino is the Managing Editor, TV and AV at Tom's Guide
Written by
Nick Pino

My name's Nick and I look after our guides to the best TVs, best OLED TVs and best 4K TVs. Most of my day is spent watching and evaluating new screens from LG, Samsung, Sony, Hisense, TCL and Vizio. I have 10 years of experience in AV, and before I joined Tom's Guide I was formerly the Senior Editor, TV and AV at TechRadar. I love helping people find the perfect TV, so please feel free to reach out over email or tag me on Twitter and I can help you out.

The quick list

The best OLED TV you can buy: a visual guide

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The full list: Best OLED TVs in detail

Samsung S95C OLED TVEditor's Choice

(Image credit: Future)
The best OLED TV in 2024 (so far)

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches
Screen Type: QD-OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1
Size: 56.8 x 32.7 x 0.4 inches
Weight: 41.7 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
One Connect box for cable management
+
Impressive brightness
+
144Hz refresh rate for PC gaming
+
Works as a SmartThings/Matter controller

Reasons to avoid

-
No Dolby Vision
-
Built-in audio is average

Samsung is back in the OLED game, and its top-of-the-line S95C OLED is the best in the business. It's technically a new QD-OLED model that offers better color saturation and brightness levels than the competition, which was something we saw reflected in our tests. We measured a 9.2ms lag time with a Leo Bodnar 4K Lag Tester, which means you'll get responsive gameplay when you pair the TV with a PS5 or Xbox Series X. 

On the picture quality side of things, the S95C covers 141.5% of the Rec 709 color space (some of the highest color saturation we've seen on any TV) and has a Delta-E accuracy score of 1.4, which means that colors highly accurate. Our tests showed that it's 30% brighter than the Samsung S95B OLED and close to double the brightness of last year's LG OLED TVs. 

Our test results and our anecdotal testing have proven to us beyond any doubt that this is the best OLED TV available to buy right now, bar none.

Read our full Samsung S95C OLED review.

Best LG OLED TV

LG G3 OLED TV playing Super Mario Bros. Wonder

(Image credit: Future)
LG's latest META panel technology is incredible

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77, 83 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1 (1 eARC)
Size: 56.7 x 32.3 x 1 inches
Weight: 61.9 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Astounding brightness for OLED
+
Superlative picture quality
+
Beautiful physical design
+
Strong smart platform

Reasons to avoid

-
Unimpressive sound
-
HDR color falls slightly short
-
No support for HDR10+

Now, Samsung isn't your only option out there. The LG G3 OLED also offers an incredible experience and scored similarly well in our testing. What does it do better than the Samsung? LG's webOS smart platform is easier to use and it comes with wall-mounting bracket that gives the G3 its gallery design.

So why is it second? Its higher price certainly hurts and, for our money, QD-OLED looks a better than LG's 3rd Gen OLED panels. It's close, and fans of LG OLED TVs will find a lot to love here, but for now the G3 OLED holds the number two spot.

Read our full LG G3 OLED review

Best Sony OLED TV

Sony Bravia XR A95L QD-OLED TV in living room

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Amazing brightness and black levels plus the best smart TV platform

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77
Screen Type: QD-OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 (2 HDMI 2.1, 2 HDMI 2.0)
Size: 56.9 x 32.8 x 1.4 inches
Weight: 51.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Remarkable picture quality
+
Superb sound
+
Google TV interface
+
Attractive, useful remote control
+
Equipped with ATSC 3.0 tuner

Reasons to avoid

-
Only two HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Not the lowest input lag you can find
-
Relatively high input lag

The top picks on our list are there because we think they offer the best bang for your buck. But if money isn't a factor in your buying decision, then the A95L OLED from Sony should definitely be in consideration. Its picture isn't just good, it's absolutely jaw-dropping. Everything we watched on it during our testing looked better than in the cinemas thanks to its perfect black levels and perfect motion processing. 

Its top-class picture processing and audio performance help justify the high sticker price, as does its support for Google TV. Even more so than LG's WebOS or Samsung's Tizen, Google TV does an exceptional job delivering recommended content based on shows and movies you've liked previously, and is easily customizable through the settings. With a Delta E of 2.856 right out of the box, it doesn't take much to get colors looking their absolute best, but Google TV doesn't make extra tweaking harder than it needs to be.

For nearly $3,000, it targets cinephiles with cash to splash, but the A95L needs to be seen to be believed.

Read our full Sony Bravia XR A95L OLED review

Best Value OLED TV

LG OLED C3 streaming

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Looking for the mid-range OLED option? Check out the LG C3

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 42, 48, 55, 65, 77, 83 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 HDMI 2.1 (1 eARC)
Size: 56.7 x 32.5 x 1.8 inches
Weight: 32.6 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Superb picture quality
+
Improved smart interface
+
Top-notch gaming features, performance

Reasons to avoid

-
Not LG’s brightest OLED TV
-
No ATSC 3.0 tuner
-
Average-at-best sound

For years, OLED has been synonymous with words like "expensive" because of their lofty sticker prices. These days, though, OLED TVs aren't significantly more expensive than their mid-range Mini-LED counterparts. The LG C3 OLED proves that point by costing under a grand for the 42-inch and 48-inch models, while keeping pace with the competition's pricing at 55-inch and 65-inch screen sizes.

The variety of screen sizes and the myriad price points is what makes the C3 a good pick if you're on the fence about dropping a ton of money on an OLED. You can dip your toes in with a smaller model to see what you think before trading out the 65-inch TV in your living room. The good news is, besides some minor differences in peak brightness, all the models have similar specs. They all are 120Hz native refresh rates and sport four full-spec HDMI 2.1 ports. In our tests, the LG C3 hit around 820 nits at peak brightness and covered 98.98% of the UHDA-P3 Color Gamut. That's a drop down from the LG G3 mentioned above, but still quite admirable. 

It can't overtake the leaders in the category like the Samsung S95C or Sony A95L, but the LG C3 OLED is a fantastic screen that you can buy for a lot less than you'd think.

Read our full LG C3 OLED review.

Best Sounding OLED TV

Sony Bravia XR A80L OLED TV streaming

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
With the best sound of any OLED, the A80L is an all-in-one solution

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 55, 65, 77 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 120 Hz
HDMI ports: 4 (2 HDMI 2.1)
Size: 48.38 x 28.13 x 2.13 inches
Weight: 39.5 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Strong picture quality
+
The best sound you’ll hear from a TV
+
Google TV smart interface

Reasons to avoid

-
Not the brightest OLED TV
-
Only two HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Relatively high input lag

If you've ever had a hard time hearing dialogue during your favorite show or movie, you'll know that sound is just as important and picture quality. Thankfully, the Sony A80L is no slouch in either category. Both its visuals and audio are fantastic, and because it sits a little lower in the lineup than the A95L mentioned above, it's not nearly as cost-prohibitive. 

That said, it sits down here on our list because it's not the brightest OLED (again, that honor belongs to either the Samsung S95C or Sony A95L) and its specs are a little less powerful than the models above it. You still get Google TV here, which is a big plus, and the perfect black levels you've come to expect from OLED.

If you want a TV that sounds as good as it looks or one that pushes the limits of the screen size without breaking the bank, the A80L delivers.

Read our full Sony Bravia XR A80L review.

Cheapest OLED TV

LG A2 OLED TV shown in living room

(Image credit: LG)
The barebones, cheapest OLED TV on the market

Specifications

Available Screen Sizes: 48, 55, 65 inches
Screen Type: OLED
Refresh Rate: 60 Hz
HDMI ports: 3 HDMI 2.0
Size: 24.4 x 42.1 x 1.8 inches
Weight: 25.4 pounds

Reasons to buy

+
Outstanding picture quality
+
Above-average sound
+
Low input lag

Reasons to avoid

-
Refresh rate limited to 60 Hz
-
No HDMI 2.1 ports
-
Limited brightness

The LG A2 OLED is the cheapest OLED TV you can buy. Trust us, we've checked, repeatedly. For a lot of folks who are curious about what OLED looks like and aren't bothered by things like motion processing performance, upscaling or color accuracy, it's the cheapest ticket in town. It's obviously held back by its lesser specs sheet, but it makes up for it by costing around $500 during major sale holidays. 

So what other compromises are there? Not only is it a 60Hz panel, but the A2 doesn't use the latest HDMI 2.1 ports. It has the lowest brightness of any OLED TV we tested, with only around 560 nits of peak brightness in HDR and 200 nits in SDR. It's also using the lowest-end processor in any LG OLED. Not to mention it's older than both the LG G3 and C3 OLEDs. 

To some folks, these discrepancies in performance won't amount to a hill of beans, and that's totally fine. If you simply want an OLED TV at the lowest price, the A2 OLED is the absolute pinnacle of OLED affordability.

Read our full LG A2 OLED review

OLED TV FAQs

How much do OLED TVs cost?

The cheapest 4K OLED TVs on the market are the LG C1 OLED and the Vizio OLED TV. Both sell at around $1,299 for the 55-inch model as standard, but both can regularly be found for less than $1,000.

The majority of OLED TVs in the 55- and 65-inch range sell for between $1,500 and $2,000, but premium models will often cost more, and larger screen sizes can routinely sell for $3,000 or more. 

We're hoping prices will continue to fall as OLED panel yields continue to rise and we see smaller and smaller models, like the new 20-inch OLED panels LG Display is researching.

What is OLED?

OLED stands for Organic Light Emitting Diode, a display technology that uses organic compounds to create clusters of red, green, blue, and white points of light to make up the individual pixels of the TV. On a 4K TV with 3840 x 2160 resolution, that means a single OLED panel will have 8.29 million pixels. And unlike standard LCD TVs, each one of those pixels produces its own light, and can be individually turned on or off, brightened or dimmed.

That pixel-level control of brightness lets OLED offer the best contrast of any display technology, with neighboring pixels delivering everything from intense brightness to true black, and every color imaginable.

As a result, OLED TVs consistently outperform the majority of LED-lit LCD TVs, whether they use standard LCD panels or boost the picture quality with enhancements like quantum dots (also known as QLED) or discrete dimming zones. 

That said, some LED technologies are starting to catch up, like the excellent Samsung Q90A for example. But as far as picture quality is concerned, OLED remains the TV tech you can rely on.

Are OLED TVs worth buying?

If you want a truly excellent TV, OLED is absolutely worth considering. It offers better picture quality than standard LCD TVs can match, and with prices coming down every year, they're no longer prohibitively expensive either. In testing and reviews, OLED TVs have consistently offered some of the best picture quality available.

There are areas of performance where LCDs offer better performance. Brightness on OLED TVs is no match for the greater intensity you can produce with an LED backlight, and LCD sets don't have the same risk of burn-in or color drift that OLEDs have to contend with long-term. But in virtually every other area, from viewing angles to color accuracy, OLED sets match or beat LCD-based competitors hands down.

But there is some question of whether that improved quality is worth the added expense. When there are 4K models selling for under $500, why spend $1,000 or more on an OLED set? There is definitely a case to be made for spending less for quality that is comparable, if not exactly the same.

But if you want the best color, contrast and overall quality you can get from a TV today, OLED is the way to go.

How to choose the best OLED TV

How to choose the best OLED TVs for you

The above selection of OLED TVs offer an embarrassment of riches for TV shoppers to choose from, with everything from basic functionality to advanced smart features and premium designs.

The biggest factor in most shopper's decision making will be price. And when it comes to OLED TVs, there are three clear price bands to choose from. 

Firstly, there's the more affordable models that come in for less than $1,500 (and even less than $1,000), such as the Vizio OLED TV, as well as the smallest screen size of the 48-inch LG C1 OLED (and watch out for the new 42-inch version of the LG C2, coming later in 2022). 

More mainstream OLED TVs fall between $1,500 and $2,000, which will let you get a solid 55- or 65-inch model. More premium models will cost more than $2,000 and larger screen sizes will range even higher.

But other differences include physical designs, from the slim pedestal base looks of the Vizio OLED TV or the LG C1, to the ultra-slim wall-hanging design of the LG G1 OLED.

Smart features are also a differentiator. LG sets offer a pretty consistent experience across all of its models thanks to the webOS platform, but Sony's Android TV and Vizio SmartCast sets have strengths and weaknesses of their own.

Sony's OLED sets use Android TV, which offers both a rich selection of apps and services along with Google-powered capabilities like Google Assistant voice control and built-in Chromecast functionality. The Vizio OLED TV, on the other hand, also has a Chromecast built-in, but offers a more limited selection of apps and more basic functionality.

Interested in a specific TV brand, price range or screen size? Check out our picks for the best TVs in each.

Best TVs | Best 4K TVs | Best smart TVs for streaming | Best TVs for gaming

The best TVs under $1000 | The best TVs under $500

Best TV brands | Best Samsung TVs | Best TCL TVs | Best LG TVs | Best Roku TVs | Best QLED TVs | Best 8K TVs

The smallest smart TVs | Best 43-inch TVs | Best 50-inch TVs | Best 55-inch TVs | Best 65-inch TVs | Best 70-inch TVs | Best 75-inch TVs | Best 85-inch TVs

How we test the best OLED TVs

How we test OLED TVs

Every OLED TV we review goes through a thorough testing and evaluation process, starting with rigorous lab testing and finishing with eyes-on evaluation by our reviewers. There's a lot more to it than just putting on a couple of 4K Blu-ray movies or hooking up a game console.

In our TV test space, we submit every TV to a number of lab tests, using industry-standard equipment, such as a calibrated spectrophotometer, calibration software and a dedicated test pattern generator. We measure for several indicators of picture quality, but these are the main metrics used in all of our reviews:

Color gamut, which measures how much color a given TV can produce. Expressed as a percentage rating, most OLED TVs meet or exceed 100% of the Rec709 color space.

Color accuracy, which measures the average deviation from perfect accuracy, expressed as a number (Delta-E), with higher numbers indicating less accurate color.

Contrast, measuring the difference between the darkest darks and brightest brights that a TV can produce, which is expressed as a ratio.

Brightness, measuring the peak luminance of a panel or display. This measure is reported in nits, an industry term for candela per square meter (cd/m2).

Lag time is the interval between a signal, such as button press on a game console, and the subsequent change registering on-screen. Measured with a Leo Bodnar Video Signal Input Lag Tester, this is measured in milliseconds, and provides a good indicator of how well-suited a TV is to modern gaming.

We pair this lab testing with hands-on time, viewing video samples and movies to see how these numbers translate into real-world performance. With that information, we can tell you which TVs look best, sound best and offer the best viewing experience.

Finally, we also evaluate the smart TV software and menus, getting a feel for the navigation and functions of each TV. We look at everything from the remote control design to the voice interaction to let us meaningfully talk about the smart features and overall ease-of-use for a smart TV.

Nick Pino
Managing Editor, TV and AV

Nick Pino heads up the TV and AV verticals at Tom's Guide and covers everything from OLED TVs to the latest wireless headphones. He was formerly the Senior Editor, TV and AV at TechRadar (Tom's Guide's sister site) and has previously written for GamesRadar, Official Xbox Magazine, PC Gamer and other outlets over the last decade. Not sure which TV you should buy? Drop him an email or tweet him on Twitter and he can help you out.