Best Android phones in Australia 2024

An in-hand view of Google Pixel 8a from the rear
(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

If there's one thing above all else that makes Android a great platform, it's choice. The best Android phones give you a wealth of options for any budget, meaning you can find a handset that perfectly suits your needs, whether you're willing to pay AU$499 or AU$2,499. All you have to do is figure out which features are most important to you. 

Of course, this article is here to point you towards the best Android phones that are currently available in Australia. So whether you want an amazing camera, a stunning screen, brilliant design or a long battery life, there are plenty of options available to you.

This year has already brought us some fantastic premium Android devices, such as Samsung's Galaxy S24, and Google's Pixel 8 and Pixel 8 Pro. However, the recent arrival of the Pixel 8a has undoubtedly had a big impact on the list below, instantly landing in a prime position.

Of course, with so many options to choose from, it can be tough for Android newcomers (and even veterans) to narrow down the best Android phones in Australia to pick. So with that in mind, here our our top picks in 2024.

The Quick List

The best Android phones you can buy today

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Best Android phone overall

Best Android phone overall

Specifications

Display: 6.8-inch Dynamic AMOLED (3120 x 1440; 1-120Hz)
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy
RAM: 12GB
Storage / Expandable: 256GB, 512GB, 1TB/ No
Rear camera: 200MP main (f/1.7), 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2), 50MP 5x telephoto f/3.4), 10MP 3x telephoto (f/2.4)
Front camera: 12MP (f/2.2)
Weight: 232g
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 16:45

Reasons to buy

+
Longest-lasting battery in a Galaxy phone
+
Outstanding performance
+
Helpful AI features

Reasons to avoid

-
Zoom lens is a step back
-
$100 price hike over predecessor

The Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra doesn’t make major hardware changes from past Samsung flagships, instead putting most of its focus on new AI-powered features. These Galaxy AI capabilities are both practical and easy to use, allowing you to do things like get real-time translations on phone calls where someone speaks another language; automatically summarize and organize your notes; and search for things just by circling them.

The hardware changes may be modest, but they’re welcome — the new Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 chipset powering the phone delivers performance that actually beats the iPhone 15 Pro Max on some speed tests. (That’s the first time we’ve seen that happen.) Power management features on the Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 also contribute to the Galaxy S24 Ultra’s epic battery life, with the phone last nearly 17 hours on one charge in our testing.

The Galaxy S24 Ultra swaps out one of its telephoto lenses for a higher resolution sensor with less of an optical zoom, and that feels like a step back — so much so that we feel like it loses out the best camera phone title to Apple's iPhone 15 Pro Max. Still, the cameras continue to produce excellent photos overall. 

The bigger consideration is its cost — starting at AU$2,199, not everyone is going to be able to afford the Galaxy S24 Ultra, but those willing to pay up will get the most premium Android device in return. With seven years of software and security support provided by Samsung, this is a device clearly built to last a long time.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra review.

Best alternative Android phone

Google Pixel 8 Pro held in hand.

(Image credit: Future)
Best alternative Android phone

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch OLED (2992 x 1344; 1-120Hz)
CPU: Tensor G3
RAM: 12GB
Storage / Expandable:&: 128GB, 256GB, 512GB, 1TB / No
Rear camera: 500MP wide (f/1.65), 48MP ultra wide (ƒ/1.95), 48MP telephoto (5x zoom, f/2.8)
Front camera: 10.5MP (ƒ/2.2)
Weight: 213g
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 10:03

Reasons to buy

+
Brighter Super Actua Display
+
7 years of software updates
+
Excellent AI-powered features

Reasons to avoid

-
Tensor performance lags other top chipsets

Despite a AU$400 price hike over last year's model, Google's Pixel 8 Pro is the search giant's best handset to date, and the absolute benchmark for how AI can be integrated into your smartphone to make your life easier. 

Sure, the Pixel 8 Pro's new Tensor G3 chip cannot match the Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 chipset in terms of gaming performance, but that was never Google's goal. Instead, the Pixel 8 Pro is leveraging AI and machine learning to give you a user experience which no other handset can even begin to compete with.

For instance, Pixel is the only place you'll find a feature like call screening, which now offers a more realistic sounding assistant to take calls for you. It even gives you a summary of what the call is about, allowing you to decide whether you want to answer it properly. That's the kind of futuristic functionality that gives the Pixel 8 Pro an actual point of difference from its competitors.

Of course, Google is once again using AI to push the Pixel 8 Pro's photographic capabilities into new frontiers. On top of improving your photos and videos via the cloud, Google's Magic Editor also lets you adjust everything about your shot, including lighting, composition, background elements — you can even swap out the sky for a prettier one. 

Additionally, a brilliant new Best Take feature is able to capture multiple shots of faces in group shots, allowing you to swap someone's face out to a better shot if they happen to blink or look away. AI can even be used to filter out unwanted background noise in videos.

So while Google no longer has much of a pricing advantage over the likes of Samsung, the Pixel 8 Pro offers a big enough leap in smarts to justify its new price point.

Read our full Google Pixel 8 Pro review.

Best mid-range Android phone

An in-hand view of Google Pixel 8a from the front

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Premium Tensor G3 performance at a more affordable price point

Specifications

Display: 6.1-inch OLED (2400 x 1080; 120Hz)
CPU: Tensor G3
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 64MP (f/1.8.9) wide, 13MP (f/2.2) ultrawide
Front camera: 13MP (f/2.2)
Weight: 192.8g

Reasons to buy

+
Powerful Tensor G3 chipset
+
120Hz OLED display
+
7 years of updates

Reasons to avoid

-
Plastic backing feels cheap
-
Camera similar to Pixel 7a

When Google's Pixel 8 and Pixel 8 Pro launched last October, each handset came with a significant bump in price over its predecessor, making it a good idea to wait for the Pixel 8a.

Well, the Pixel 8a has finally arrived, and while the phone hasn't avoided a price hike (it now starts at AU$849 — AU$100 more expensive than the Pixel 7a), it's still the smarter purchase when it comes to bang for your buck.

For starters, the Pixel 8a matches the flagship Pixel 8 in many important areas — apart from sharing nearly identical 120Hz OLED displays (Pixel 8a is 0.1-inches smaller), both handsets are powered by Google's latest Tensor G3 chipset, meaning you can expect the same level of performance and AI functionality.

And, like its flagship sibling, the Pixel 8a boasts a 7-year commitment from Google when it comes to software and security updates, meaning your device should be good from a OS standpoint until at least 2031.

So why the AU$350 gulf in price between the Pixel 8 and Pixel 8a? The differences are more granular than you may think. For instance, while the Pixel 8a's 64MP main camera has a higher megapixel count than the 50MP one on the Pixel 8, the latter sports larger megapixels, allowing for better low-light photography. Additionally, the Pixel 8a only offers digital zoom, and also lacks a hi-res photo mode.

And then there's the overall feel of the device — while we appreciate that the Pixel 8a's plastic backing is now fingerprint-resistant, there's no denying it feels cheap. Meanwhile, the Pixel 8a sports older Corning Gorilla Glass 3 on its display, making it far less durable than the Gorilla Glass Victus-adorned Pixel 8.

Still, when you consider how much money you'll save by opting for the Pixel 8a, we think these trade-offs are more than acceptable. While most mid-range devices will keep costs down by resorting to a weaker or older chipset, Pixel 8a is able to boast flagship-level AI features and performance while still keeping its price well below the standard Pixel 8.

Read our full Google Pixel 8a review.

Most affordable Samsung flagship

Samsung Galaxy S24

(Image credit: Future)
Samsung’s most affordable flagship

Specifications

Display: 6.2-inch AMOLED (2340x1080)
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, 256GB / No
Rear cameras: 50MP main (f/1.8), 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2), 10MP telephoto (f/2.4) with 3x optical zoom
Front camera: 12MP (f/2.2)
Weight: 167g
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 13:28

Reasons to buy

+
Handy AI-assisted features
+
Significantly improved battery life than Galaxy S23
+
Supports 7 years of updates

Reasons to avoid

-
No major camera hardware change
-
Snapdragon chip in North American models only

Despite being overshadowed by its bigger, more expensive siblings, the best things about the Galaxy S24 is that it packs a lot of muscle power in such a compact design. 

Specifically, the Galaxy S24 runs on the same Snapdragon 8 Gen 3 for Galaxy chipset that powers more expensive S24 models. That not only means a performance boost over previous Galaxy S phones, it also helps the S24 turn in a time on our battery test that tops the average smartphone.

The Galaxy S24 offers a telephoto lens — not something you always find on a phone at this price. And all the cameras on the Galaxy S24 impress, as they benefit from Samsung's effort to improve low-light photography. However, the biggest incentive to get the S24 over other phones is its handful of Galaxy AI features. Some of them are practical and intuitive to use, saving you time to do other stuff.  Aside from that, the Galaxy S24 delivers the best of Samsung's flagship lineup in a more affordable package.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy S24 review.

Most affordable Google flagship

Google Pixel 8 in sand

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
Affordable flagship with AI powers

Specifications

Display: 6.2-inch OLED (2400 x 1080; 60-120Hz)
CPU: Tensor G3
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable:&: 128GB, 256GB/ No
Rear camera: 500MP wide (f/1.65), 12MP ultra wide (ƒ/2.2)
Front camera: 10.5MP (ƒ/2.2)
Weight: 187g
Battery life (Hrs:Mins): 9:50

Reasons to buy

+
Awesome AI camera feature
+
Brighter 120Hz display
+
More compact design

Reasons to avoid

-
Performance and battery life lag other flagships
-
$100 price increase

Given the Pixel 8 Pro's substantial price increase over its predecessor, some users may find the regular Pixel 8 to be the better buy this year. 

For one, both phones are powered by the Tensor G3 chip, which means all of the AI features found on the AU$1,699 Pixel Pro 8 are also offered by the AU$1,199 Pixel 8 — and that includes impressive AI-enhanced photo-editing tools like Magic Editor and Best Take.

On top of this, the Pixel 8 sports a new display that's brighter than before, along with a wider aperture on its main camera, leading to better low-light photo capture. Perhaps the biggest improvement is in the Pixel 8's battery life, which is far longer than what the Pixel 7 managed, though it still lags behind other phones in its price range.

Sure, the Pixel 8 is slightly more expensive than last year's model, but the improvements in AI features and battery life are well worth spending the extra dollars on. It's also considerably cheaper than the Galaxy S23 and iPhone 15.

Read our full Google Pixel 8 review.

Best flip-phone foldable

Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 5 on wicker table showing front display

(Image credit: Future)
Still the reigning flip phone champ

Specifications

Display: 6.7-inch FHD AMOLED (2640 x 1080) inner, 1.9-inch AMOLED (260 x 512) cover
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 2
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 256GB, 512GB / No
Rear cameras: 12MP (f/1.8) main, 12MP (f/2.2) ultrawide
Front camera: 10MP (f/2.4)
Weight: 187g

Reasons to buy

+
Much better battery life
+
Great performance
+
Improved outer display

Reasons to avoid

-
Minimal camera upgrades
-
Display crease still prominent

While a slate of new Motorola Razr phones has finally brought some competition to the table, Samsung's Galaxy Z Flip 5 is still the reigning champ in the clamshell space thanks to its refined design and superior Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 chipset.

It also sports a larger and more useful 3.4-inch Super AMOLED Flex Window on its exterior than last year's model — it brings a much needed boost for the phone, offering a wider range of supported apps and a better photo-taking experience.

That said, it does feel like Samsung played it safe with this iteration, though we hope to see the South Korean electronics giant take some bigger swings next year in order to compete with cheaper competing flip phones now available on the Australian market.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Z Flip 5 review.

Best foldable

Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 5 half folded

(Image credit: Future)
The most premium foldable phone on the market

Specifications

Inner display: 7.6-inch Dynamic AMOLED (1812 x 2176; 120Hz)
Cover display: 6.2-inch Dynamic AMOLED (904 x 2316; 120Hz)
CPU: Snapdragon 8 Plus Gen 2
RAM: 12GB
Storage / Expandable: 256GB, 512GB, 1TB / No
Rear cameras: 50 MP (f/1.8) main, 10MP (f/2.4) telephoto, 12MP (f/2.2) ultra-wide
Cover camera: 10MP (f/2.2)
Under display camera: 4 MP (f/1.8)
Weight: 253g

Reasons to buy

+
Improved cameras
+
Stunning display
+
Qualcomm's top chipset
+
S Pen functionality

Reasons to avoid

-
Very expensive
-
Still has display crease

While it could be argued that Samsung has phoned things in with the Galaxy Z Fold 5, in that it feels nearly identical to its predecessor, there are some notable improvements over the Galaxy Z Fold 4 if you look hard enough. There's also very little competition for this form factor in Australia, outside of the Oppo Find N3, which isn't that easy to find these days.

However, we believe the Samsung Z Fold 5 wasn't made for those who already own a Z Fold 4, but rather those who are interested in switching to a premium foldable and want the best you can currently buy.

And there are definitely some welcome upgrades to last year's model, starting with a new Flex hinge which finally allows the device fold fully flat without any gap. It's also thinner and lighter than its predecessor, and boasts a main display that's even brighter than before. 

Additionally, it also sports the more powerful Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 chipset, which not only provides better battery life, but also allows for an improved multitasking experience. With these upgrades in mind, it's easy to see why consider the Galaxy Z Fold 5 the best foldable phone available in Australia.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy Z Fold 5 review.

Best budget Android phone

Samsung Galaxy A54

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
A mid-range handset with premium ambitions

Specifications

Display: 6.4-inch Super AMOLED (2340 x 1080)
CPU: Exynos 1380 (5 nm)
RAM: 6GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB, Yes (up to 1TB microSD)
Rear cameras: 50MP wide (f/1.8); 12MP ultrawide (f/2.2); 5MP macro (f/2.4)
Front camera: 32MP (f/2.2)
Weight: 202g

Reasons to buy

+
Improved 50MP main camera
+
Excellent shots in low light
+
Bright, colorful display
+
Very good battery life

Reasons to avoid

-
No wireless charging
-
Performance could be better
-
Noticeable bezel

Samsung's Galaxy A54 once again delivers a mid-range phone that takes the fight directly to Google's Pixel 6a (and presumably the upcoming Pixel 7a) by delivering a handset that looks and feels more premium than its AU$699 RRP would suggest.

Here's a phone with a gorgeous 6.4-inch Super AMOLED display that's not only bright and vibrant, but also silky smooth thanks to its 120Hz adaptive refresh rate. It also manages excellent battery life, lasting 10 hours and 20 minutes in our battery test (and 11 hours and 46 hours with the refresh rate lowered to 60Hz).

We also love its extended software update policy, which promises a total of four OS updates and five years of security updates. Admittedly, the Galaxy A54 does fall short of the Pixel 6a in terms of performance, and we imagine that gap will only increase when the Pixel 7 arrives. That said, its beautiful design, terrific software support and excellent 50MP main camera make the Galaxy A54 well worth its affordable price point.

Read our full Samsung Galaxy A54 review.

Best value Motorola phone

Motorola Edge 30 Fusion

(Image credit: Future / Stephen Lambrechts)

9. Motorola Edge 30 Fusion

An excellent mid-range option

Specifications

Display: 6.55-inch P-OLED (2400 x 1080); 144Hz
CPU: Snapdragon 888 Plus
RAM: 8GB
Storage / Expandable: 128GB / No
Rear cameras: 50 MP main (f/1.8), 13 MP ultra-wide (f/2.2), 2 MP depth (f/2.4)
Front camera: 32 MP wide (f/2.5)
Weight: 168g

Reasons to buy

+
Premium design
+
Very fast 68W charging
+
Impressive 144Hz display

Reasons to avoid

-
No wireless charging
-
Only 128GB of storage

Although our full review is yet to come, we've spent enough time with Motorola's new Edge 30 Fusion to be confident in its inclusion on our list of the best Android phones in Australia. 

Sporting premium looks and a classy design, the upper mid-range Edge 30 Fusion delivers an ambitious triple-camera array led by a 50MP main sensor. That's backed up by 13MP ultra-wide snapper, and a 2MP depth sensor for impressive bokeh shots. On the front of the device, the Edge 30 Fusion offers an excellent 32MP selfie camera.

Boasting impressive performance thanks to its Snapdragon 888 Plus chipset — the same one that powered Samsung's premium S21 Ultra — the Edge 30 Fusion feels fast and snappy to navigate. This feeling is bolstered by a stunning 144Hz P-OLED display that puts the Pixel 7's 90Hz screen on notice. At AU$899, the Edge 30 Fusion is easy to recommend.

Find out more about the Motorola Edge 30 Fusion.

How to choose the best Android phone for you

What are the best Android phones?

Here at Tom's Guide, we've taken the liberty of testing all of the major flagship Android phones in our quest to narrow down the best. Right now, the best Android device for most people is undoubtedly the Samsung Galaxy S24 Ultra, thanks to its refined design, powerhouse performance, top-notch cameras, excellent AI features and a built-in S Pen. 

The AU$1,699 Pixel 8 Pro offers the best value for a flagship Android phone, hands down. It also features the new Tensor G3 chipset, taking advantage of Google's advancements in AI and machine learning to make it the smartest Android device around. That said, it's significantly more expensive than last year's Pixel 7 Pro, so you may want to weigh the pros and cons of each model before upgrading this year.

That said, if you're set on upgrading, you can get most of the same features from the smaller Pixel 8, which is much more affordable at a starting price of AU$1,199.

Of course, if you're on a budget but still want a flagship-level smartphone experience, it's hard to beat the Pixel 7a, which arguably improves upon the standard Pixel 7 in a number of ways. The same can be said of Samsung's excellent Galaxy A54, which offers a number of premium features at a mid-range price point.

Those are the best traditional handsets out there, but if you're ready to join the foldable revolution, Samsung's Galaxy Z Fold 5 and Flip 5 are easily the two most premium phones on the market, thanks to their unmatched quality and top-of-the-line Snapdragon 8 Gen 2 chipsets.

How to choose the best Android phone for you

When looking to purchase a new Android phone, the first thing you'll undoubtedly look at is price. As you move up to around the AU$749 mark, you'll start to find more compelling handsets, touting better processors, higher-grade materials and more camera lenses. Progress into the AU$999-and-up range, and the best phones offer flagship-caliber performance along with cutting-edge computational photography and special features.

The most premium Android phones offer foldable designs, though there's talk a new round of devices from Samsung could make foldables more mainstream — that is, make the prices more affordable.

iPhone users looking to switch to Android have lots of choices, as we've outlined above. It's also easier to move platforms, as the Switch to Android app for iOS now supports all Android 12 phones.

How we test the best Android phones

How we test the best Android phones

Every smartphone Tom’s Guide evaluates is tested for several days in real-world use cases and benchmarked with a gamut of performance-measuring apps. In terms of performance, we used Geekbench 5 to measure overall speed and 3DMark Wild Life to measure graphics performance.

We also use our own video editing test in the Adobe Premiere Rush app to see how long it takes to transcode a clip, which we run on both Android phones and iPhone to compare performance. (This test is not always available for all phones we test due to app compatibility issues.)

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Performance benchmarks
Row 0 - Cell 0 Geekbench 5 (single-core / multicore)3DMark Wild Life Unlimited (FPS)
Galaxy S24 Ultra2300 / 7249123.5
Google Pixel 8 Pro1699 / 366652
Pixel 7a1018/306541.1
Google Pixel 81569 / 374454
Galaxy S242235 / 6922120.4

One of the most important tests we run is the Tom's Guide battery test. We run a web surfing test over 5G (or 4G if the phone doesn't have 5G support) at 150 nits of screen brightness until the battery gives out. In general, a phone that lasts 10 hours or more is good, and anything above 11 hours makes our list of the best phone battery life.

Swipe to scroll horizontally
Display benchmarks
Row 0 - Cell 0 sRGB (%)DCI-P3 (%)Delta-E
Galaxy S24 Ultra139 (Vivid) / 119 (Natural)98.5 (Vivid) / 84.9 (Natural)0.25 (Vivid) / 0.23 (Natural)
Google Pixel 8 Pro127.7 (Adaptive), 110.7 (Natural)90.4 (Adaptive), 78.4 (Natural)0.23 (Adaptive), 0.16 (Natural)
Pixel 7a129.8 (Adaptive) / 111.7 (Natural)91.9 (Adaptive) / 79.1 (Natural)0.05 (Adaptive) / 0.11 (Natural)