FCC Wants Gigabit Internet Communities Nationwide by 2015

On Friday, FCC Chairman Julius Genachowski challenged broadband providers and state and municipal community leaders to have at least one gigabit Internet community in each state by 2015. The challenge is obviously propelled by Google's accomplishments with Google Fiber in Kansas City which is currently offering gigabit internet to residents along with a streaming TV service.

"American economic history teaches a clear lesson about infrastructure," Genachowski said. "If we build it, innovation will come. The U.S. needs a critical mass of gigabit communities nationwide so that innovators can develop next-generation applications and services that will drive economic growth and global competitiveness."

To help communities meet this challenge, Genachowski revealed plans to create a new online clearinghouse of best practices to collect and disseminate information about how to lower the costs and increase the speed of broadband deployment nationwide, including ways to create gigabit communities. He also proposed working jointly with the U.S. Conference of Mayors on the best-practices clearinghouse effort.

As part of Genachowski's plan, the FCC will hold workshops on gigabit communities that will include broadband providers and state and municipal leaders. Subjects will include evaluating barriers, increasing incentives, and lowering the costs of speeding gigabit network deployment. The resulting collaboration of all workshops will inform the Commission's clearinghouse about how the industry, local and state leaders can effectively establish gigabit communities nationwide without breaking the local economies.

"The FCC’s Broadband Acceleration Initiative is working to expand the reach of robust, affordable broadband by streamlining access to utility poles and rights of way, and improving policies for wireless facilities siting and other infrastructure," the FCC said on Friday. "Gigabit communities can also benefit from tens of thousands of miles of critical 'middle mile' fiber infrastructure funded throughout the country by the Broadband Technology Opportunities Program run by the National Telecommunications and Information Administration."

The FCC noted Google's success in building a gigabit community in Kansas City as well as a local utility in Chattanooga, Tennessee which deployed a fiber network to 170,000 homes. This latter new network created more than 3.700 new jobs over the last three years thanks to Amazon and Volkswagen. The FCC also noted the Gig.U initiative which has catalyzed $200 million in private investment to build ultra-high-speed hubs in the communities of many leading research universities.

"The Gigabit City Challenge is designed to drive a critical mass of gigabit communities like these, creating new markets for 21st century services, promoting competition, spurring innovation, and driving economic growth nationwide," the FCC added.

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  • The only problem with this is that the internet providers usually don't want to provide premium bandwidth unless they can charge a premium price.
    20
  • The problem isn't the technology. The reason Google had to build there own network is that most of the Telecom companies are owned by greedy crooks who only upgrade networks when they need to spend money for some other reason. Google figured the only way to get reliable internet in the US is to build it themselves. Give it 10 years when Google has Gigabit to nearly every house that the government that's here to protect "our" interests will look into "anti-competitve" practices because everybody likes cheap, reliable, fast internet.

    Future Gigabit Add:

    Now with Gigabit Speeds!

    Small print

    $19.99 for the first six months, $149.99 + one child + one limb every month thereafter. Gigabit speeds only guaranteed for 2.5 nanoseconds a month. A limit of 2 MB a month applies, once you've reached this limit your speed will drop arbitrarily to speeds were you might as well break out your old 1800 baud modem. 2 year contract, early termination fee equal to Federal Deficit applies for ending contract early.

    (Then again this kinda looks like a lot of cell phone contracts today)
    11
  • Yeah, we've heard this before. Considering the FCC is nothing more than the ISP/Cable/Tele Co's lobby group, I don't think anyone believes these clowns.
    10
  • Other Comments
  • The only problem with this is that the internet providers usually don't want to provide premium bandwidth unless they can charge a premium price.
    20
  • Yeah, we've heard this before. Considering the FCC is nothing more than the ISP/Cable/Tele Co's lobby group, I don't think anyone believes these clowns.
    10
  • These kinda speeds won't be possible by the majority of ISP providers without major network overhauls to fiber. This would cost billions and realistically wouldn't happen, or would take 10+ years to accomplish. Hell for this reason Verizon Fios has stopped building there network out, cost was greater then what they were getting back in. Don't get my wrong I would love to see this happen but in reality one can't be so optimistic with what we have now.
    0