Nokia’s New Budget Phone Lineup Includes a Classic Candybar

BARCELONA — HMD Global’s flagship Nokia 9 PureView might grab the spotlight at Mobile World Congress this week with its five (yes, five) rear-facing camera lenses. But if you want a solid, less expensive smartphone that promises Android updates for two whole years, Nokia’s new budget handsets are also worth a look.

Nokia 4.2

Nokia 4.2

Nokia is continuing its confusing naming process with its $199 4.2 and and $169 3.2 models — Nokia has never released a 4-series before, so 4.2 doesn’t make much sense. But the two handsets have plenty to offer: giant displays with tiny teardrop notches, a dedicated Google Assistant button, a new AI face unlock feature that Nokia claims is spoof-proof, and guaranteed upgrades to Android Q and Android R down the line.

Nokia 3.2

Nokia 3.2

There are a few key differences between the two phones, though — namely the 4.2’s fingerprint sensor and dual-lens camera.

Nokia 4.2 vs. 3.2: Specs Compared


Nokia 4.2
Nokia 3.2
Price
$169-$199
$139-$169
Display
5.71 inches (19:9 aspect ratio)6.26 inches
CPU
Qualcomm Snapdragon 439Qualcomm Snapdragon 429
RAM
2GB, 3GB
2GB, 3GB
Storage
16GB, 32GB
16GB, 32GB
Rear Camera
13-MP, 2-MP
13-MP

Nokia 4.2

Nokia 4.2

Nokia 210: The candybar lives on

Of Nokia’s new phones, it’s the $30 Nokia 210 that warms our cold, cold hearts. Nokia’s classic candybar, with its 2G connectivity and Opera Mini browser, is no smartphone replacement. But it comes with our favorite throwback game, Snake, preloaded. (I played it; it remains awesome.)

Nokia 210

Nokia 210

The Nokia 210 also comes with a removable 1020 mAh battery that can last a month on a charge without dying. This phone has little relevance in today’s world, but we still love it.

Nokia 1 Plus: Forgettable Android Go

The last budget model in the lineup, Nokia’s $99 1 Plus, offers a 5.45-inch LCD display with 18:9 aspect ratio and runs Android 9 Pie Go, which means its apps are smaller and lower-powered than on a phone capable of running full Android. If you need a cheap phone, this one seems...fine.

Outlook

It’s unclear whether some or all of Nokia’s budget phones will make their way to the U.S. The company just recently partnered with Verizon and Cricket to make its devices more widely available in the States with the exclusive Nokia 3.1 Plus (Cricket) and 2 V (Verizon). Those first prepaid devices could pave the way for more Nokias to land on carrier shelves this year.

Credits: Tom's Guide