Meta Quest 3 release date, price, specs and latest news

Meta Quest 3
(Image credit: Meta)

The Meta Quest 3 is officially here and it's available to purchase now. The headset builds upon the popular Meta Quest 2 and adds full-color video passthrough and mixed reality features. It's also the best VR headset available (though the Apple Vision Pro may have something to say about that soon).

While the Quest 3 costs $200 more than the Quest 2, it does come with a fair amount of upgrades. The new headset features a 40% slimmer visor and a new Snapdragon chipset to power its virtual reality and mixed reality experiences. While Meta plans to keep the Quest 2 around for a while, it's clear that the Quest 3 is undoubtedly the flagship of its lineup.

Meta Quest 3 release date

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta Quest/YouTube)

The Meta Quest 3 is officially available for purchase!

Right now, if you purchase the 128GB model you’ll get Asgard’s Wrath 2 for free. If you upgrade and Purchase the 512GB model you'll also get a six-month Meta Quest Plus subscription in addition to the free game. This pre-order offer ends on January 27, 2024.

You can pre-order the Quest 3 from the Meta Store in 23 countries or from select retailers. In the U.S. you can pre-order from Amazon, Best Buy, Target and Walmart. U.K. customers can pre-order from Amazon, Curry's and Argos.

One place you currently cannot buy the Meta Quest 3 is China, but that looks set to be changing. According to The Wall Street Journal, Meta is returning to China and it's bringing the Quest 3 with it. However, the expectation is this version of the Quest 3 will be cheaper — tentatively dubbed a "Quest 3 Lite" by some analysts. 

Meta Quest 3 price

In the U.S., the Meta Quest 3 starts at $499 for a model with 128GB of storage, which is $100 more than the Quest 2 and its $299 price tag. There is also a larger storage size model — 512 GB — available for $649.

In the U.K., the launch price is £479 for the 128GB model and £619 for the larger 512GB model. In the E.U. the launch price is €549 for the 128GB model and €699 for the 512GB model. In Australia, the launch price for the 128GB base model is AU$799.

Meta Quest 3 specs

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Price$499.00 (128GB), $649 (512GB)
Release dateOctober 10
CPUQualcomm Snapdragon XR2 Gen 2
RAM8GB
Storage128GB, 512GB
Display4K+ Infinite Display (2 LCDs with 2064 x 2208 pixels per eye)
Full-color passthroughTwo RGB cameras (18 PPD)
Refresh rate90Hz (native), 120Hz (experimental)
Field of View110 degrees horizontal, 96 degrees vertical
Weight515 grams
Dimensions184 mm x 160 mm x 98 mm
Battery lifeup to 2.9 hours (rated)
Charge time2 hours (rated)
Backwards compatibleYes
Eye trackingNo
ConnectivityWi-Fi 6e, Bluetooth 5.2

The Meta Quest 3 comes in two storage sizes: 128GB and 512BG. This is slightly disappointing since 256GB feels like the perfect storage size, but at least there is an option for those that need a ton of space. 

But more importantly, the Quest 3 is getting a new chipset. The headset is powered by the brand-new Qualcomm Snapdragon XR2 Gen 2. Meta says this gives the Quest 3 twice the graphics processing power of the Quest 2. The Quest 3 is also getting a RAM upgrade, with 8GB of RAM instead of the Quest 2's 6GB. Unfortunately, this does fall short of the 12GB of RAM you get with the Meta Quest Pro.

a render image of the Meta Quest 3's Snapdragon chipset

(Image credit: Meta)

The Meta Quest 3 also gets an upgraded display. Meta calls the new displays the 4K+ Infinite Display, which is two LCDs using pancake optics to achieve 2,064 x 2,208 pixels per eye resolution. Meta says this enhances the Quest 3's resolution by nearly 30% compared to Meta Quest 2. Further resolution specs include 25 pixels per degree (PPD) in virtual reality and 1,218 pixels per inch (PPI). 

When using the headset's full-color video passthrough, the resolution does dip a bit. In mixed reality, the resolution is 18 PPD powered by two RGB cameras rather than 25 PPD. However, this is still an upgrade, as Meta says this is "over 10x more pixels in Passthrough compared to Quest 2 and 3x more pixels compared to Quest Pro."

In terms of refresh rate, the Quest 3 features a native 90Hz refresh rate with a 120Hz experimental refresh rate. Hopefully, the Quest 3 eventually pushes 144Hz thanks to eventual post-launch updates but for now, it caps out at 120Hz. 

One aspect of the Quest 3 that is not getting an upgrade is battery life. The Quest 3 features the same battery life numbers as the Quest 2, which according to Meta is typically around 2.2 hours but can push 2.9 hours when just consuming media. The headset will charge back up to full from 0% in two hours with the included 18W charger, which is also about on par with the Quest 2.

Meta Quest 3 design

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta)

The Meta Quest 3 has been completely redesigned from the "inside out" according to Meta. While the headset has the same overall aesthetic as the Quest 2, its optic profile is now 40% slimmer, thanks in part to pancake lenses. It also has a bold trio of two pill-shaped RGB cameras and a depth projector on the front of the headset to facilitate the full-color video passthrough. 

There's also a new Lens Distance Adjustment Wheel that allows for more precise interpupillary distance (IPD) fine-tuning. The headset supports an IPD of 53 mm to 75 mm. The built-in eyeglasses and depth adjustment eliminate the need for the glasses spacing insert that you needed with the Quest 2.

The speakers also get a boost in the Quest 3. Meta says the audio range for the Quest 3 is 40% louder than the Quest 2 and that the Quest 3 produces 3D spatial audio with enhanced clarity and bass. There is a 3.5 mm headphone jack if you want to plug in your own headphones for more immersive audio.

In terms of the strap, the Quest 3 gets a soft strap included with an optional hard Elite Strap available for purchase for $69. This is similar to the Quest 2, though the strap design is slightly altered for a more secure fit. However, Meta has officially paused sales of the Elite Strap with Battery. This is because the external battery included with this version of the Quest 3's strap won't recharge. It's unclear why this issue occurred but Meta says that units without the critical flaw are being manufactured and will arrive at retailers.

One downside to all of these design changes? The impressive components are going to be difficult to replace. In a teardown of the new Quest 3, iFixit found that the repairability of the Quest 3 is poor, giving it a 4 out of 10 repairability score. This is largely due to the difficulty in getting to the headset components, but also due to the lack of replacement parts available to consumers if something does break. 

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta)

As for the controllers, Meta has redesigned the Quest 3's Touch Plus controllers to be more ergonomic — not easy to tell from the quick video, but we have noticed a major improvement in our hands-on time with the headset. 

The Touch Plus controllers also sport TruTouch haptics, giving the Quest 3 controllers a feature we love in the PSVR 2. This should provide users with a more realistic and immersive experience.

Unfortunately, the Touch Plus controllers — frustratingly — rely on disposable AA batteries. However, the headset does have a Meta Quest Charging Dock available for an additional $129. The wireless charging for the headset is facilitated by contact pads on the bottom of the headset and includes lithium-ion rechargeable batteries for the controllers.

Meta Quest 3 features

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta)

The headline feature for the Quest 3 is, of course, the mixed reality capabilities facilitated by the headset's full-color video passthrough. This allows you to go back and forth between immersive VR content and passthrough-facilitated AR experiences with holographic overlays with a simple double-tap on the side of the headset to swap. Check out our guide to the new Meta Quest 3 mixed reality features, including five that you can try as soon as you get the headset.

The Quest 3 will also get access to the Quest 2's entire library of content, including all of the best Meta Quest 2 games. Plus, over 100 new Quest 3 apps and upgraded Quest 2 apps are coming to Meta Quest 3 through the end of the year, meaning you'll have no shortage of experiences and games to try out. Make sure to check out our round-up of the Meta Quest 3 games we know are coming so far.

The Quest 3 also gets the Quest 2's PC VR compatibility with Windows PCs thanks to the Quest Link and Air Link. That means access to nearly all of the best VR games. And, like the Quest 2, it'll get access to Meta Quest Plus. Quest Plus is Meta's VR gaming subscription service that offers two curated games a month to subscribers for just $7.99 a month.

One feature that should be a major improvement? Thanks to the Quest 3's six advanced camera sensors, the Quest boundary feature can now automatically scan your playspace to determine your playspace boundary. Quest 3 can automatically scan your room in 3D, understanding where walls, floors, furniture and other surfaces are located, which is a huge boost the ensuring mixed reality experiences function properly.

Unfortunately, while the Quest 3 does get Direct Touch hand tracking it will not feature eye tracking. That means no foveated rending on the Quest 3 — a feature you do get on pricier headsets with beefier hardware.

Meta Quest 3 vs Meta Quest 2

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta Quest/YouTube)

Just because Meta has a new flagship headset doesn't mean that it's forgetting about the popular Meta Quest 2. In fact, the Quest 3 announcement made it seem like the Quest 2 will now serve as the entry point into the metaverse for the near future, with Quest 3 providing the ultimate Meta Quest experience. Check out our full Meta Quest 3 versus Meta Quest 2 face-off to see all the biggest differences between the two headsets.

If you don't want to pay up for the Quest 3, don't feel like you have to. Thanks to Meta's price reduction and its commitment to building out a Quest product line, there's never been a better time to buy the Quest 2. Check out our three reasons why you should buy the Meta Quest 2 right now.

Meta Quest 3 vs Apple Vision Pro

Apple Vision Pro vs Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Future/Meta)

Meta isn't the only company out there with a new headset. Apple has announced the Apple Vision Pro — the company's first headset ever. And while both headsets show off their mixed reality features, the two headsets are genuinely different. And it's not just about the price tag and specs, both headsets tackle the issue of experiencing mixed reality in notably different ways. Check out our Apple Vision Pro versus Meta Quest 3 face-off for the full breakdown.

Meta Quest 3 outlook 

Meta Quest 3

(Image credit: Meta)

Overall, it looks like Meta added a lot of meaningful upgrades to the Quest 3. A slimmer design, improved displays, a more powerful processor and improved controllers are just part of the improvements Meta has made. And it allows you to experience mixed reality without needing to spend $999 for the Meta Quest Pro, which is a welcome development.

But at $200 more than the Quest 2, the Quest 3 is going to need to prove that its performance is noticeably superior and that mixed reality is worth the extra money. It's largely proven the former, but mixed reality still isn't quite there. We still think that the Quest is enough of an improvement overall that it's worth getting over the Quest 2, just don't expect a mixed reality marvel yet. Hopefully, that will improve as more developers release Quest 3 apps.

Malcolm McMillan
Senior Streaming Writer

Malcolm McMillan is a senior writer for Tom's Guide, covering all the latest in streaming TV shows and movies. That means news, analysis, recommendations, reviews and more for just about anything you can watch, including sports! If it can be seen on a screen, he can write about it. Previously, Malcolm had been a staff writer for Tom's Guide for over a year, with a focus on artificial intelligence (AI), A/V tech and VR headsets.


Before writing for Tom's Guide, Malcolm worked as a fantasy football analyst writing for several sites and also had a brief stint working for Microsoft selling laptops, Xbox products and even the ill-fated Windows phone. He is passionate about video games and sports, though both cause him to yell at the TV frequently. He proudly sports many tattoos, including an Arsenal tattoo, in honor of the team that causes him to yell at the TV the most.

  • sheriffbullock
    Please, no more rechargeable controllers. I have too many cables and devices that need to be plugged in using said cables. I prefer the convenience of removable batteries over built-in battery packs. Besides, rechargeable battery packs are no more environmentally-friendly than rechargeable AAs.
    Reply
  • anscarlett
    Higher resolution displays, uhd for each eye and a wider hFoV. 120hz is fine, no need to go over that. Flexible oled would be nice to curve them around your head.
    Faster cpu/gpu.
    Wifi 6e.
    Magnetic pogo cables and a dock for headset and controllers. Please no more plug and socket charging cables!
    Thunderbolt 4 for pcvr
    Eye tracking.
    Auxiliary usb c for additional accessories.
    Wide angle stereoscopic front passthrough cameras.
    Better controllers, grip sensors, more solid wrist straps
    Please offer a dark grey or black option.
    Reply
  • LunaticMS
    I think there's exactly ONE feature that will absolutely make the next Quest the undisputed king of VR, and that's built-in (or otherwise easy) wireless streaming of games from a PC. Basically the only objective downside to the Quest over a wired headset is that the quest can't play all VR games onboard, and can only play certain ones via a special cord connected to your PC. The HTC Vive has an adapter to make it wireless, but it requires an expensive accessory that requires you to plug a card into your computer's motherboard, which not everyone can afford/use. A completely standalone headset that can be used anywhere AND can play high-quality games wirelessly from a PC in the room would basically be the best of all worlds, with the only advantage of other headsets being minor incremental improvements like FOV, refresh rate, eye tracking, better audio delivery, and more specialized controllers, none of which have proven essential for the most popular VR games, and basically all of which are currently trumped by the Quest's portability, ease of use, and price point.

    And the best part is that people have already done this on the Quest 2, apparently to amazing success (under the right circumstances). From the sound of it, you currently need to sideload some special software and have good internet, delivered from a good router (that may or may not need line of sight to the headset itself). They have been reluctant to endorse this feature since an improper setup can cause lag and motion sickness, but if they can include some additional hardware (either onboard or perhaps a USB-C accessory) to improve the wireless connection to the point of being stable for even most users, I would ditch my Index and buy a Quest 3 in a heartbeat.
    Reply
  • Keng Yuan
    OLED.
    Reply
  • traditional_elk67
    LunaticMS said:
    I think there's exactly ONE feature that will absolutely make the next Quest the undisputed king of VR, and that's built-in (or otherwise easy) wireless streaming of games from a PC. Basically the only objective downside to the Quest over a wired headset is that the quest can't play all VR games onboard, and can only play certain ones via a special cord connected to your PC. The HTC Vive has an adapter to make it wireless, but it requires an expensive accessory that requires you to plug a card into your computer's motherboard, which not everyone can afford/use. A completely standalone headset that can be used anywhere AND can play high-quality games wirelessly from a PC in the room would basically be the best of all worlds, with the only advantage of other headsets being minor incremental improvements like FOV, refresh rate, eye tracking, better audio delivery, and more specialized controllers, none of which have proven essential for the most popular VR games, and basically all of which are currently trumped by the Quest's portability, ease of use, and price point.

    And the best part is that people have already done this on the Quest 2, apparently to amazing success (under the right circumstances). From the sound of it, you currently need to sideload some special software and have good internet, delivered from a good router (that may or may not need line of sight to the headset itself). They have been reluctant to endorse this feature since an improper setup can cause lag and motion sickness, but if they can include some additional hardware (either onboard or perhaps a USB-C accessory) to improve the wireless connection to the point of being stable for even most users, I would ditch my Index and buy a Quest 3 in a heartbeat.

    This is already a feature on the Quest 2. All you have to do is buy the Virtual Desktop app from the Oculus Store and then download the streamer app on your PC. It's simple and easy to do. You don't need a cutting edge WIFI 6 "Gaming" Router. It works with minimal latency on 5ghz wifi. I use a $60 router from Archer and it works fine.

    I've been playing SkyrimVR, Blade and Sorcery, and No Man's Sky VR on my Quest 2 every night wirelessly for the past several months. It's a game changer.
    Reply
  • clampton
    HDR will be impressive in VR... turning away from blinding light will bring massive immersion.
    Reply
  • JunkieXLL
    Wider FoV. This should be a feature paramount to development, yet is often disregarded. The narrow FoV on most headsets is absolutely immersion-breaking and once you experience a wider FoV headset, it's almost impossible to go back to things like the Reverb G2 and Quest 2 etc. even if they have higher resolutions. The Quest 2 is OK, but its narrow FoV and abysmal battery really hold it back. The resolution, refresh rate and XR2 chip is more than enough. If the Q3 comes with 130 hFoV, a battery of at least 50% or higher SoT with better tracking it would be an easy day 1 purchase for me. If the Q3 is still at or similar FOV to the current Q2, it will be a hard pass for me.
    Reply
  • MeditatingHamster
    For me, my essential upgrades would be...

    Larger sweet spot. Quest 2 was a downgrade from the Rift-S in this regard and annoying.
    Granular IPD adjustment, because no one wants their experience tarred by a Jack Sparrow vision simulation.
    Proper head strap. The Quest 2 came with a strap that looked like it came from a sumo wrestlers underpants and was completely inadequate for the job.
    Better quality lenses. The Quest 2 suffers from lens flare and rays in dark scenes in a way that ruined the Big Screen experience for me, and was a step down from the Rift-S in that respect.

    The nice-to-have's would be....

    Access to other marketplaces for android apps such as the Amazon App Store and Google Play store. No one likes being locked out of the apps they use on a daily basis on their phone and tied in to an ecosystem with limited apps.
    Better quality passthrough and a move towards more augmented reality content.
    Eye tracking like PSVR 2 to assist with foveated rending of where your eyes look. PC VR already puts a strain on the GPU, more so with the move to USB C with the Quest 2 instead of the DisplayPort used by the Rift-S. The GPU could do with a helping hand, especially with the direction GPU prices have gone over the past few years.
    Slimmer design, the Quest 2 is currently not comfortable for me over long periods with it being front heavy.
    Wider FOV

    Things to keep would be....

    Keep the AA batteries. Very convenient with a AA battery charger just to swap them out and carry on playing. I really don't want a proprietary battery pack.
    Reply
  • MeditatingHamster
    sheriffbullock said:
    Please, no more rechargeable controllers. I have too many cables and devices that need to be plugged in using said cables. I prefer the convenience of removable batteries over built-in battery packs. Besides, rechargeable battery packs are no more environmentally-friendly than rechargeable AAs.

    I'm with you on that one. I have a AA battery charger that can charge up 4 x AA batteries in 20 minutes. So easy to just swap them out carry on playing!
    Reply
  • Stealth Pyros
    traditional_elk67 said:
    This is already a feature on the Quest 2. All you have to do is buy the Virtual Desktop app from the Oculus Store and then download the streamer app on your PC.
    You don't really even need that. The default built-in AirLink works good enough. VD is definitely better as it gives you more configuration, though.
    Reply