The Galaxy S10+ Will Be the Biggest Android Phone Ever (Report)

Samsung could be planning a big jump in screen size for its largest smartphone next year. But do we really want something this big?

Credit: Tom's Guide

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The Korean tech giant is planning to offer a Galaxy S10+ with a screen size of 6.44 inches, SamMobile is reporting, citing an unidentified source. That would make the device's screen notably larger than the display you'd find in this year's Galaxy S9+, which spans 6.2 inches. It would also be substantially larger than the 5.8-inch screen you'd find in the standard Galaxy S9.

The report suggests that Samsung's Galaxy S10+ will be the biggest smartphone the company has ever released. The upcoming Galaxy Note 9 is rumored to sport a 6.38-inch display.

It's important to note that Huawei is reportedly working with Samsung an even more massive 6.9-inch display for phones, but it's not at all clear when that might show up in a handset.

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The report is just the latest in a string of Galaxy S10 rumors. Just this week, another report suggested that Samsung would launch three new Galaxy S units next year, with the two biggest handsets topping out at 6.2 inches. It's possible that the 6.44-inch screen could be in the works and designed for another smartphone.

What all the reports seem to agree on, however, is that Samsung is planning a triple-lens camera for the highest-end Galaxy S10 it launches next year. And while details are scant on the shooter, it's possible that the cameras could be similar to the Huawei P20 Pro, which features two color sensors and one monochrome option.

Additionally, Samsung is expected to integrate a virtual fingerprint sensor into the display of the Galaxy S10 and to include 3D facial scanning, similar to the iPhoen X.

The company has reportedly decided to launch the Galaxy S10 line in January at CES 2019. The move will allow Samsung to launch its foldable Galaxy X at Mobile World Congress in February, according to reports.