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Mobile Devices with Multi-Core Processors by 2013

From a hardware standpoint, where will mobile devices be three years from now? According to market research firm In-Stat, 2013 will be the year a vast majority of MIDs, netbooks, smartphones, and other mobile devices will feature processors with more than two cores. In-Stat predicts that the entire multi-core invasion will begin next year, in 2010, with smartphones and netbooks initially joining the multi-core collective.

However, in 2011, MIDs and UMPCs will receive the multi-core treatment, followed by CE devices somewhere between 2012 and 2013. In-Stat said that by 2013, almost 88-percent of the processors sold into the mobile market segment will be multi-core processors. The company also said that the ARM architecture will see a higher growth rate over the more common x86 architecture.

"Integration of graphics/multimedia acceleration is a key trend as well," said Jim McGregor, In-Stat analyst. "While multi-core dominates in the high performance mobile computing segments, integration of graphics/multimedia acceleration favors the smartphone, MID/UMPC and mobile entertainment device segment."

Entitled Mobile Processor Review, In-Stat's research is available for all to download and enjoy for a whopping $3,495 USD. While the collected data may be informative, we can't help but think that kind of money could be better used on a smoking hot gaming PC with a 3D HD display. Still, it's cool so see a glimpse into the future.

Kevin started taking PCs apart in the 90s when Quake was on the way and his PC lacked the required components. Since then, he’s loved all things PC-related and cool gadgets ranging from the New Nintendo 3DS to Android tablets. He is currently a contributor at Digital Trends, writing about everything from computers to how-to content on Windows and Macs to reviews of the latest laptops from HP, Dell, Lenovo, and more. 

  • neodude007
    Make batteries that last 5 times longer and you can do whatever you want to my smartphone. Battery 1st, CPU power later imo.... unless they are sooo efficient they don't use moar power.
    Reply
  • mlopinto2k1
    Hmmm...
    Reply
  • doesnt the zune use that multicore nvidia processor?
    Reply
  • Honis
    The company also said that the ARM architecture will see a higher growth rate over the more common x86 architecture.
    That's a "duh" point to make. The x86 architecture is only in netbooks and devices that aren't considered a "mobile device". ARM already "dominates" x86 in this market!

    I like the prediction of multiple cores. We can only hope they double battery life before they actually make it to market.
    Reply
  • False_Dmitry_II
    tgoods44doesnt the zune use that multicore nvidia processor?
    It uses the tegra but that's like calling any graphics card multi-core.

    Reply
  • Shadow703793
    The thing is, will programmers use the extra Cores? If the availability of multithreaded apps in x86-64 CPUs then I'm assuming we won't get many multithreaded apps for ARM.....
    Reply
  • Mulder19
    Shadow703793The thing is, will programmers use the extra Cores? If the availability of multithreaded apps in x86-64 CPUs then I'm assuming we won't get many multithreaded apps for ARM.....
    Well, I imagine it is more for multi-tasking than multi-threading. Cell-phone apps don't require more than a single core, but for playing music, surfing and texting it could be beneficial.
    Reply
  • dark_lord69
    Not really surprised by this...
    Reply
  • If MS is continuing to push heavier OSes, then yes.
    If we're allowed to have a DX10, SSD trim compatible Win98 40bit version, then perhaps a single core will do just fine!
    Reply
  • imrul
    i wish it was earlier...
    Reply