The best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting

Best headphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting
(Image credit: Blue)

The best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting make it brilliantly easy to create your own home recording setup, with sound quality that can beat the mics built into even the best gaming headsets. From in-game comms that cut through the chaos to crystal-clear podcast recordings, even with with multiple guests, these mics will deliver.

For these rankings we've focused on desktop microphones. One of the great things about these kinds of microphones is that they're easy to use: just plug them in, power up and start speaking. 

To find out more about the best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasts that we’ve recorded, read on — and consider the best webcams for streaming as well.

Top 3 best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting

Why you can trust Tom's Guide Our expert reviewers spend hours testing and comparing products and services so you can choose the best for you. Find out more about how we test.

Best overall: Blue Yeti 
The Blue Yeti has been the king of affordable USB microphones for years, and it tops the list here too. Its sound quality far exceeds its pricing, and with multiple recording patterns to choose from, you can adjust the Blue Yeti for group podcasts and interviews as well as the kind of solo recording you’d perform when gaming or streaming. (opens in new tab)

Best overall: Blue Yeti
The Blue Yeti has been the king of affordable USB microphones for years, and it tops the list here too. Its sound quality far exceeds its pricing, and with multiple recording patterns to choose from, you can adjust the Blue Yeti for group podcasts and interviews as well as the kind of solo recording you’d perform when gaming or streaming.

Best value: JLab Talk
If you can’t stretch the few extra dollars for the Blue Yeti, the JLab Talk is a seriously good alternative. It offers rich and clear recordings, and it also has the exact same recording pattern options as the Blue Yeti. The JLab Talk is a great choice at a great price.  (opens in new tab)

Best value: JLab Talk
If you can’t stretch the few extra dollars for the Blue Yeti, the JLab Talk is a seriously good alternative. It offers rich and clear recordings, and it also has the exact same recording pattern options as the Blue Yeti. The JLab Talk is a great choice at a great price. 

Best features: Blue Yeti X 
The upgraded Blue Yeti X version ranks highly. It doesn’t provide drastically improved sound, but does manage to take the Yeti’s broad design and make it even easier to use, with a gain control that allows fine adjustments and an LED display that usefully shows your mic level. (opens in new tab)

Best features: Blue Yeti X
The upgraded Blue Yeti X version ranks highly. It doesn’t provide drastically improved sound, but does manage to take the Yeti’s broad design and make it even easier to use, with a gain control that allows fine adjustments and an LED display that usefully shows your mic level.

The best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting you can buy right now

Top Pick

(Image credit: Ken Makin)
The best microphone for gaming, streaming and podcasting

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Bidirectional, Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Stereo
Size: 11.6 x 4.9 x 4.7 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Range of modes
+
Good price
+
High sound quality

Reasons to avoid

-
Fixed mount

Blue microphones are held in high regard for their gaming and streaming performance, and you can see why from the number of them on this list. The flagship Blue Yeti is the best of the best in terms of quality and value, combining top-notch recording and a range of recording pattern options with an affordable price.

It’s not just ideal for gaming and streaming, either. The Blue Yeti’s omnidirectional and bidirectional modes also make it an excellent choice for podcasters, especially if you want to record someone multiple speakers with a single mic.

Read our full Blue Yeti review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: JLab TalkTop Pick

(Image credit: Future)
The best value gaming, streaming and podcasting microphone

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Bidirectional, Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Stereo
Size: 9.9 x 7.6 x 7.6 inches (with tripod extended)
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Good sound quality
+
Excellent value for money
+
Versatile

Reasons to avoid

-
Can pick up background noise
-
Bidirectional mode not great

The JLab Talk is absolutely worth considering if you want the flexibility and recording quality of the Blue Yeti at an even lower price. Its only real drawbacks compared to its big rival are a more plasticky design and a less impressive bidirectional mode — but the former is balanced out by the Talk’s more adjustable stand, and the latter can largely be ignored if you just use omnidirectional recording instead.

Otherwise, this is a fantastic debut microphone from JLab. Voice recordings sound a little richer than the identically-priced Blue Yeti Nano, and it’s as simple to get up and running as a USB microphone can get.

Read our full JLab Talk review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: Rode PodMic

(Image credit: Future)
The best dedicated podcasting mic

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Cardioid
Size: 6.8 x 4.3 x 2.4 inches
Connection Type: 3-pin XLR

Reasons to buy

+
Fantastic sound
+
High build quality
+
Low price
+
Internal pop filter

Reasons to avoid

-
XLR not ideal for beginners
-
Stand not included

While a lot of USB mics can handle a lot of different roles, the Rode PodMic excels as a specialized podcasting microphone. Its integrated pop filter helps produce clean, clear sound, with background noise kept to a minimum. This latter detail is important on any microphone, obviously, but avoid distractions is especially vital when recording a podcast.

The PodMic's laser-focus means it's not for everyone. Besides lacking a stand, presumably on the grounds that any serious podcaster will add their own preferred stand, its XLR connection means you can't just plug it into your PC or laptop. But if you have the hardware to support the PodMic, it's worth buying and then some.

Read our full Rode PodMic review

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: Blue Yeti X

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)
The best premium Blue microphone for gaming, streaming and podcasting

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Bidirectional, Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Stereo
Size: 11.4 x 4.3 x 4.8 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Blue Yeti sound quality
+
Enhanced controls
+
Flexible but not overcomplicated

Reasons to avoid

-
More expensive

This souped-up Blue Yeti spinoff adds a handful of design improvements, like a set of customizable LEDs that can give you real-time feedback on how loudly you’re speaking. The gain control also moves to the front, which is a more sensible position than the rear-mounted gain dial of the standard Blue Yeti.

Why, then, is the Blue Yeti X not at the top of this list? Considering how much more expensive it is than both the Blue Yeti and the JLab Talk, it doesn’t quite make the same value proposition, even with its various tweaks. That said, if you can afford the premium, there’s no arguing against this being the most advanced gaming, streaming and podcasting microphone of the three.

Read our full Blue Yeti X review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: Movo UM700

(Image credit: Movo)
A cheaper, lighter Blue Yeti alternative

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Bidirectional, Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Stereo
Size: 11.6 x 4.4 x 3.8 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Appealing price
+
Plug-and-play simplicity
+
Sturdy design

Reasons to avoid

-
Sensitive to shocks and bumps
-
Blue Yeti sounds slightly better

The Movo UM700 is billed as a "Blue Yeti killer," and while we found it falling a little short of such a feat, it's still one of the best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting. At the very least it's cheaper than the standard Blue Yeti, and is about a pound lighter too.

You also get all of the same recording patterns, so there's plenty of flexibility for switching between a solo streaming setup and group podcasts. Other than needing some gain tweaks, the UM700 makes for a good beginner's mic, thanks to its simple plug-and-play design and straightforward controls.

Read our full Movo UM700 review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: Blue Yeti Nano

(Image credit: Future)
A great compact Blue Yeti microphone

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Cardioid, Omnidirectional
Size: 8.3 x 3.8 x 4.3 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Great sound
+
Study build
+
Cheaper than the Blue Yeti

Reasons to avoid

-
No stereo mode
-
Basic controls

Sitting somewhere between the standard Blue Yeti and the Blue Snowball Ice, the Blue Yeti Nano aims to offer to the same recording quality as namesake — but in a smaller package, and at a lower price.

Sure enough, the Blue Yeti Nano sounds great and remains enticingly affordable. The JLab Talk delivers slightly better audio, a couple of extra directional patterns and an adjustable stand, but the Nano is still a respectable alternative. Cardioid recording works well for gaming and streaming, while its omnidirectional mode caters for podcasts with multiple speakers.

Read our full Blue Yeti Nano review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: Elgato Wave 3

(Image credit: Corsair)
The best microphone for streaming

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Cardioid
Size: 6.0 x 2.6 x 1.6 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
Designed for streaming
+
Intuitive setup
+
Simple design

Reasons to avoid

-
No standout features
-
Susceptible to background noise

Aspiring streamers, here’s a microphone specifically for you. The Wave: 3 is accessibly priced, uses a cardioid recording pattern that’s ideal for solo streaming, and is built to work seamlessly with the Elagto Stream Deck: a 16-button keypad that’s become a staple of many professional streaming setups.

By using the Stream Deck to control your mic’s recording properties, you can adjust the sound input using the same interface for controlling the stream itself. And the Wave: 3 itself isn’t half bad either: it’s got high sound quality, easy USB connectivity and a more tasteful look than the HyperX QuadCast.

Read our full Elgato Wave: 3 review.

Best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting: HyperX Quadcast S

(Image credit: Future)
The best gaming microphone for RGB fans

Specifications

Mic Type: Condenser
Audio Patterns: Bidirectional, Cardioid, Omnidirectional, Stereo
Size: 10 x 5 x 5 inches
Connection Type: USB

Reasons to buy

+
High sound quality
+
Customizable lighting
+
Built-in shock mount and pop filter

Reasons to avoid

-
Standard QuadCast is cheaper

Yes, the standard QuadCast is cheaper, but if you want to add some flair to your on-screen streaming setup — or you just have a soft spot for RGB lighting — the more colorful, customizable HyperX QuadCast S is a good choice as well.

This delivers the clean, crisp recording quality you'd expect for the price, and with its integrated pop filter and shock mount, there's added protection against unwanted sounds. There's a good range of directional patterns too, though the RGB lighting really is the star of the show. You can enjoy its gently pulsing default effect or download HyperX’s NGENUITY software to choose your own colors and effects.

Read our full HyperX QuadCast S review.

How to choose the best microphone for gaming, streaming and podcasting

The qualities that make a microphone ideal for gaming also tend to make it ideal for streaming: when you’re the only person speaking into the microphone, the only directional pattern you really need is cardioid, so as long as overall sound quality is up to standard you can go without omnidirectional, bidirectional or stereo modes. You should be able to simply plug the microphone in, tilt it towards your mouth and focus on playing.

Conversely, you should choose a microphone with bidirectional and/or omnidirectional modes if you’re going to be recording podcasts by having multiple people speak into the same mic. The bidirectional patten records directly in front of and behind the microphone, while omnidirectional pattern picks up everything in a 360 degree radius. As such, bidirectional is better for one-on-one conversations like interviews, while omnidirectional is better for group chats.

Alternatively, if you can afford multiple microphones for each speaker, make sure they’re all in cardioid mode so they only pick up their respective user.

Many of the microphones on this list are capable of gaming, streaming and podcasting. You only need to spend more on a specialized device, like the Rode Podcaster, if you know you’re only going to focus on just one of these applications. Still, you should consider any features you might want outside of sound quality and supported directional patterns, like onboard controls. These can help you adjust how you sound on the fly without needing to dive into potentially confusing software.

How we test the best microphones for gaming, streaming and podcasting

We test microphones is conditions as close to their intended use cases as possible. For gaming, streaming and podcasting microphones, that naturally means trying each mic in a variety of situations.

Besides simply gaming, usually with our headset mic disabled and using the microphone on test as the input instead, we’ll also use each model in meetings and on group calls so we can solicit feedback on how each one sounds.

We’ll also record ourselves speaking, using the various directional patterns if available, and listen back to judge for ourselves. This also lets us see whether every microphone plays nicely with recording software, like you might use while streaming, though since plug-and-play simplicity is a hallmark of USB microphones there are rarely any hiccups.

Contributions from: Jame Archer

Lee Dunkley
Audio Editor

As a former editor of the U.K.'s Hi-Fi Choice magazine, Lee is passionate about all kinds of audio tech and has been providing sound advice to enable consumers to make informed buying decisions since he joined Which? magazine as a product tester in the 1990s. Lee covers all things audio for Tom's Guide, including headphones, wireless speakers and soundbars and loves to connect and share the mindfulness benefits that listening to music in the very best quality can bring.