Skip to main content

Xbox Series X review: The ultimate Xbox is here

The Xbox Series X is the pinnacle of Microsoft’s gaming efforts

xbox series x review
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Tom's Guide)

Our Verdict

The Xbox Series X is the pinnacle of Microsoft's gaming efforts, blending the promise of powerful next-generation performance with superfast loading times and a huge library of games spanning multiple Xbox generations.

For

  • The only Xbox you need
  • Lots of power
  • Games load very fast
  • Clean and cool design
  • Stellar backwards compatibility

Against

  • Few next-gen launch games
  • Large and heavy

The Xbox Series X has finally arrived and has been released out into the wild. It's spearheading Microsoft's next generation of consoles, with the Xbox Series S playing the role of a less powerful and less expensive sibling. Sporting a somewhat unassuming design, the Xbox Series X is a box that promises to deliver the pinnacle of Microsoft’s gaming efforts, both now and in the future. 

While it might not be flush with exclusive launch titles, there’s a lot to like about the Xbox Series X. It’s effectively the one and only Xbox you need, serving not just as a next-gen console but as a machine to play an expansive catalogue of Xbox games dating way back to 2001’s original Xbox.

While the Xbox Series X might not represent the jump in tech we experienced from the Xbox 360 to the Xbox One, there’s still a lot to digest and enjoy here. Read our full Xbox Series X review to see whether the new console has been worth the wait.

Xbox Series X specs

CPU: 3.8GHz 8-core AMD Zen 2
GPU:
Custom RDNA 2, 12 teraflops, 52 CUs
Memory: 16 GB
Storage: 1 TB SSD
Max Resolution: 8K
Max Framerate: 120 fps
Ports: HDMI, USB-A, Ethernet
Size: 11.9 x 5.9 x 5.9 inches
Weight: 9.8 pounds

Xbox Series X review: Price and availability 

The Xbox Series X has been released worldwide and you can go and order one right now. Just be aware that stocks of the Xbox Series X and the Series S are very low, and many retailers have sold out already. So you might struggle to find one today and potentially up until the end of the year. However check out out handy where to buy guide to be in with the best chance as possible to get hold of an Xbox Series X. 

Prices start at $499 in the U.S. and £449 in the U.K., meaning the Xbox Series X matches the price of the PS5 in those respective nations. However, it’s more expensive than the PS5 Digital Edition, which costs $399, or £349. 

With its 12 teraflops of graphics power compared to the PS5’s 10 teraflops, you’ll get more graphical bang for your buck with the Series X. You also get a 1 TB SSD as opposed to the PS5's 825GB SSD. 

Speaking of storage, modern games take up a lot of space, with the likes of Dirt 5 gobbling up more than 60GB of SSD space. If you want a comprehensive library of Xbox games on your Series X, you’ll need to fork out for an proprietary external SSD, which adds another $200 (or more) to the price of the Series X. Next-generation gaming certainly won’t be cheap at launch. 

Xbox Series X: Design 

You’d be forgiven for saying that the Xbox Series X looks like a small-form factor PC, because it does; at least, when it’s standing upright. Its monolithic design could be seen as uninspired. But I rather like the system's clean and unfussy appearance. It’s big, however. 

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Measuring 15.1 x 15.1 x 30.1 centimeters (5.9 x 5.9 x 11.9 inches) and weighing 9.8 pounds, the Series X is a rather bulky machine, though not as large as the PS5. This means you’ll struggle to fit it into an entertainment unit, unless you place the device on its side. There’s a quartet of soft pads on one side of the console to show you which way it should be positioned when lying sideways. These also prevent the console from slipping around. 

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

I think the Xbox Series X looks a little clunky and clumsy on its side, a bit like the lovechild of an audio amplifier and a brick. I keep mine upright and sitting partially behind my TV, given the lack of space in my flat. The console looks better upright, and this way, you can peer into the top vent of the console, which seems to glow, thanks to green accents around the holes.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Given that the Series X sucks in cool air through the bottom of the console and vents it out the top, I think orienting the console vertically is probably better for its cooling system. Speaking of which, that system runs very quietly and coolly, though you can feel a waft of heat if you touch the top vent. It’s a testament to the engineering Microsoft has put into the Series X, given its powerful hardware in a rather compact form. You'd struggle to make a gaming PC this small with equivalent capabilities. 

In fact, while it might look a little clunky peeking out from behind my TV, I think the Series X looks rather good sitting on a desktop. If you plan to plug the system into a 4K or high-refresh-rate monitor, you could be pleasantly surprised.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

While I wasn't a fan of the VCR-like look of the original Xbox, the Series X appears to be borrowing from the clean design of the Xbox One X, only making it bigger. There’s no light bar here or spinning LED rings. Rather the only illumination comes courtesy of a jewel Xbox power button that glows a clean white when the Series X is turned on. 

I don't think the Xbox Series X will go down in console history as a high point in tech design. But the simple aesthetic isn’t likely to age rapidly, and I reckon it’ll easily become something that melds into your entertainment setup.  

Xbox Series X review: Ports 

Keeping with the clean look, the Xbox Series X has only a USB 3.1 Type-A port and a Blu-ray disc drive on the console’s front. There's also a wireless controller pairing button. That makes it very easy to quickly plug in a controller to charge, or an external hard drive to transfer games and saves to and from the Series X.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Around the back of the Series X, there’s a much wider port selection. You’ll find one HDMI 2.1 port: crucial for gaming at 8K, and allowing TVs with 120 Hz panels to take advantage of the 120 frames per second frame rate for certain games. There are also two more USB 3.1 ports - handy for external storage that you plan to keep connected to your console - as well as an Ethernet port and Kensington lock. 

There’s no optical audio connection or HDMI-in port, like there were on the Xbox One and One X. However, dropping optical audio is likely to be a pain for only people with powerful audio systems, and the HDMI connection can still carry Dolby Atmos and surround sound signals. We’re not really sure if many people used the HDMI-in, so dropping it from the Series X isn’t a big deal. It also avoids any chance of plugging an HDMI cable into the wrong port, then wondering why your TV isn’t getting a signal: something that's happened to me before. 

The most noteworthy port however, is the expansion slot. This is for the proprietary external PCIe 4.0 SSD that will let you expand the Series X with an extra 1 TB of speedy storage.

Xbox Series X: Interface and Quick Resume 

Xbox Series X

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

You'll be disappointed if you were expecting a big user interface change with the Xbox Series X, as its UI is pretty much identical to that of the Xbox One. That’s not a bad thing, as that UI was pretty comprehensive, with a whole suite of options from managing games and apps, to transferring data between drives, to finely calibrating HDR displays and audio kit. 

There are all manner of interesting options that carry over from the Xbox One to the Series X, such as the ability to remotely access your console and stream games over a local Wi-Fi connection. Eventually, we expect to be able to stream games from the Series X over cellular broadband. But that was part of Microsoft's Project xCloud game steaming initiative, and has yet to be integrated into any Xbox console. 

However, if you have an Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription, you can stream a range of Xbox games to an Android device, and those will sync with the progress you’ve made on the Series X or Xbox One. In fact, cross-platform syncing is one of the joys of the Series X. As soon as I installed Xbox One games on the Series X, the interface pulled my saves from the cloud and allowed me to carry on from where I left off. 

Speaking of Xbox Game Pass, a lot of the Series X’s UI is geared around highlighting what’s new on the subscription service, which is pretty handy if you’re after a new game to play. This Xbox Game pass focus, plus the overall tile menu format can make it a little fussy, and occasionally tricky, to find what you’re looking for, unlike the very clean PS4 interface. But anyone familiar with the Xbox One UI will be completely at home on the Series X. It further stands to highlight how the Series X is less of a next-gen console, and is instead the flagship for an Xbox ecosystem.

If time is money, then the Xbox Series X is going to save you a lot.

One of the best new UI features is Quick Resume. In a nutshell, this allows you to have multiple games loaded up at the same time, and lets you jump out of the action in one title, then start another game, then jump back into the fist game exactly where you left off, almost as if you’d simply paused.

Xbox Series X

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

This doesn't happen instantly, but it’s much faster than loading games from scratch. Unfortunately, there weren’t a huge amount of games that worked with Quick Resume during my testing, but that will change once the console is fully released. 

Nevertheless, the PS5 doesn't have an equivalent of Quick Resume, and this feature could be a boon to people who like to game in quick bursts and across multiple titles. And it’s dead simple to use: Simply hit the Xbox button on the controller when you’re in one game, navigate to another title and it’ll load up. Then, hop back to the game you were playing first, and you’ll be able to continue from exactly where you left off. 

Xbox Series X review: Performance  

This is where things get rather tricky. At the time of writing there are basically no true next-generation titles for the Xbox Series X that we can put to the test. (The likes of Assassin's Creed Valhalla are on their way and promise to usher in next-gen graphics and lighting effects like ray-tracing.)

Gears 5 is one title that has been given the full Xbox Series X optimization treatment. That means it can run at 4K resolution and 60 frames per second, or 120 fps if you have a compatible TV. 

Gears 5

(Image credit: Microsoft)

If you own an Xbox One X, then you may have already played Gears 5 at 4K and 60 fps, as the console supports that. However, that’s a best-case scenario, and the One X will downscale resolution in favor of frame rate when there's a lot going on in the game. According to the folks at Digital Foundry, who have the tech to test such things, this can still happen on the Series X-optimized version of Gears 5. But the 12 teraflops of graphics power means that the system usually maintains a 4K presentation and a reasonably steady 60 fps. 

Again, that might not sound too impressive until you realise there’s quite a bit going on to upgrade Gears 5’s visuals over the One X version. It's basically using the Ultra settings found in the PC version, which improves texture detail - though you’ll need to look pretty closely to notice huge differences - as well as better lighting and improved shadow details. 

The game also uses something called "screen space global illumination," which could be best explained as a "ray-tracing lite." This has the result of illuminating areas that might otherwise be a lot darker, as well as showing muzzle flashes reflected in the chunky Gears armor. 

I’m not going to say these upgrades represent a step into next-gen gaming, but they certainly look impressive and show off Gears 5 in its best light (quite literally). The game looks utterly fantastic and runs smoothly. 

Interestingly, Gears 5 doesn’t run on the Xbox Series X’s Velocity Architecture, which promises to deliver super fast loading times. But it almost doesn't need to, as it loads games in under 10 seconds. On an Xbox One X, you’re looking at loading times of 40 seconds or more. 

In other unoptimized games, the Series X's SSD resulted in some huge differences in loading times. Forza Horizon 4 loaded in 22 seconds, including cloud save synching, whereas my One X it took 48 seconds to do the same. 

Red Dead Redemption 2

(Image credit: Rockstar Games)

But the most noticeable difference was in Red Dead Redemption 2. Given the size of the game’s open-world, it’s no surprise that on the One X, a save file takes well over a minute to load up. In one test, it took 1 minute 28 seconds to load from the main menu into my most recent game save. On the Series X, the same save took only 38 seconds to load, which is a huge improvement. If time is money, then the Series X is going to save you a lot. 

As RDR2 hasn't been optimized for Series X, it will run at 4K, but won't run beyond 30 fps. However, it seems to stick rather firmly to the 30 fps mark, whereas on the One X, I’d occasionally encounter frame rate drops. I hope Rockstar releases an update that enhances Red Dead Redemption 2 for the Series X, as I have a feeling the new console would be able to run the game at 60 fps and 4K, helping add an extra layer of polish to a game that’s already spectacular to behold. 

By the time the Xbox Series X launches, there should be optimizations for the likes of Dirt 5, Ori and the Will of the Wisps, Watch Dogs: Legion and more. So while you won’t have Halo Infinite or Fable 4 to play at launch, there should be a clutch of games that will at least embrace some of the Series X’s horsepower. 

There have been reports that the Series X can get quite hot. But I found my unit not only kept rather cool, but also ran whisper-quiet. If you get close up to it, you can hear the fan whirring. But it’s a long way from the One X’s fan noise, and a world apart from my PS4, which now sounds like a jet engine when running demanding games. 

As more true next-gen games arrive, I’d not be surprised if the Series X gets a little nosier and warmer, as it’ll no doubt have to push its AMD Zen 2-based Ryzen processor and RDNA 2-based Radeon GPU a lot harder. However, it looks like Microsoft has really applied some strong engineering to ensure it can keep the Series X cool. 

Xbox Series X review: Backwards compatibility 

Over the past few months I’ve spent a lot of time writing about how impressive the backward compatibility of the Series X could be. I wasn't disappointed. 

Naturally, the Xbox Series X can run pretty much any Xbox Game Pass title out of the box. But impressively, I was able to take old Xbox 360 game discs and pop them into the Series X, and it would recognize them. Granted, it needed to go and download the game, using the disk more as a proof-of-purchase. But once that was done, the backwards compatibility mode works wonders. 

Everything loads very fast, courtesy of the SSD, and the brute force of the Series X will allow games to run a lot better than they did before. The caveat here is that if games were originally locked at 30 frames per second, then they won’t go beyond that. 

I found that to be the case with Red Dead Redemption, which runs at 4K/30 fps on the Series X, much like it did on the One X. Throwing Assassin's Creed 2 in the Series X results in a game that loads a lot faster and feels smoother than it ever did on the Xbox 360. 

As Digital Foundry explains, Xbox One games with high performance targets, performance modes, or dynamic resolution scaling, tend to run at the best settings available to them on the Series X, thanks to the console's raw graphical power. It’s important to point out that the Series X runs these games in a backwards compatibility mode, which means they won’t really be able to benefit from the GPU improvements AMD’s RDNA 2 architecture brings to the table, unless they are optimized at a later date. 

I’m really hoping Microsoft encourages developers to patch older games to take advantage of the Series X’s power. Microsoft could also create a system that allows the Series X to bring its full might to bear on older games. 

One backwards compatibility feature I'm rather impressed by is Auto HDR, which uses machine-learning to effectively apply high dynamic range to games that were never mastered for HDR. In Red Dead Redemption and Gears of War Ultimate Edition, I think the effect works rather well.

As with a lot of AI-based tech, this has the potential to go wrong, and oversaturate or overexpose some scenes. But I didn’t encounter any issues, and even Assassin’s Creed 2 looked rather nice, though the effect wasn’t hugely pronounced. 

Combine this feature with the Xbox Series X’s power to basically bulldoze over unoptimized older games, and the Series X is arguably the best console on which to play Xbox games, from the latest Xbox One titles back to original Xbox games. And I feel there’s a lot more potential for backwards compatibility to be improved once the Series X is out in the wild.

Xbox Series X review: Controller 

One thing that hasn’t really changed from the Xbox One to the Xbox Series X is the Xbox Wireless Controller. The overall design is very similar to its predecessor. While familiarity sometimes breeds contempt, that’s not the case here.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The Xbox Wireless Controller has long been one of the most comfortable controllers I’ve used, taking the Xbox 360 controller and building upon it. And the same is true with the new controller, though it does have a few extra features.

From a quick glance the most notable change is the addition of a share button for sharing screenshots and recordings with a simple tap. You’ll then notice that the D-pad is a hybrid one: a concave disk that should deliver more precision, particularly if you play traditional beat-em-ups. The finish on the new controller has a more matte look, with the black appearing smokier. The Xbox button is also now all-black.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The new controller fits my hands almost exactly like its predecessor. But it has a textured surface to its triggers and underside, which improves the controller's overall grip. The triggers are slightly smaller and feel a little more tactile, as do the shoulder buttons. And the joysticks have a firmer, more satisfying click to them than those on the older controller.

xbox series x review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

None of these changes are revolutionary - if you want that then check out the PS5’s DualSense controller - but they all add up to a nicely evolved Xbox Wireless Controller. The only really hiccup is that the controller still gets its power from AA batteries. While they can be replaced with a rechargeable battery pack that charges via USB-C, the use of alkaline batteries seems a bit archaic.

Xbox Series X review: Game library 

Assassin's Creed Valhalla

(Image credit: Ubisoft)

Don't expect a suite of next-generation games for the Xbox Series X when it’s released on November 10. There’ll be no Halo Infinite, which is a disappointment. That was set to be a major launch title for the Series X, but has been pushed back to 2021. 

But you’ll still have plenty to play. Most notable is Assassin's Creed Valhalla, which comes out on the same day as the Series X and is effectively a launch title, albeit a third-party one. There’ll also be Dirt 5, which promises to have Series X optimizations, as well as The Falconeer, Tetris Effect: Connected, Yakuza: Like a Dragon, and Destiny 2: Beyond Light

You’ll also have Series X-optimized versions of games like Watch Dogs: Legion, Forza Horizon 4, Ori and the Will of the Wisps and Sea of Thieves. 

There have been better launch lineups in the past, but that’s to be expected, given how the coronavirus pandemic has wreaked havoc with game development and launch plans. But the silver lining is that you’ll have a huge range of Xbox Game Pass titles to choose from, as well as older Xbox games to revisit, thanks to the Series X’s comprehensive backwards compatibility. 

On top of that, there's EA Play access on the Series X, which gives you a selection of EA games like Star Wars Squadrons and Battlefield V. It’ll be free for people with an Xbox Game Pass Ultimate subscription, further building upon the library of games you can access for a single monthly cost of $15.

Furthermore, Microsoft has a large clutch of game studios under its Xbox Game Studios banner, which all appear to be working on new titles. We can expect more Xbox- and Windows 10-exclusive games to arrive in 2021 and beyond. 

And finally, Microsoft now owns Bethesda and all of its sub-studios, so we can expect a lot more Xbox Series X-optimized games in the near future, as well as games like The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim being added to Xbox Game Pass. 

Ultimately, there's no one flagship game to nail to the mast of the Xbox Series X. But the console's ability to play current Xbox games at a native 4K resolution with improved frame rates, as well as the significant potential to get a large influx of next-gen games next year, means I’m not too concerned about its lackluster launch lineup.

Xbox Series X review: Should you buy one now?  

The easy answer to this question is yes. If this is your first foray into Xbox gaming, then the Xbox Series X is the console to get. It’s the machine to play Xbox games on, whether they came out yesterday or a decade ago. And the sheer power of the Series X means it’s set to deliver some impressive next-gen games over the next 12 months and beyond. 

If you have an original Xbox One or One S, then the Series X is going to deliver a noticeable hike in power, effectively improving the performance across your game collection. If you have a 4K TV, then it’s also the next-gen Xbox to get. For people sticking with 1080p TVs, or who plan on gaming on a PC monitor, then the Xbox Series S might be worth looking at. Otherwise the Series X is the better long-term investment. 

Xbox Series S review

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The answer gets a lot more difficult if you have an Xbox One X. Released late 2017, the One X is still a rather powerful gaming console and will deliver 4K gaming for a good range of games. Its backwards compatibility is also expansive, and delivers results that are seemingly on a par with the Series X in the older games I tested.

The Series X has the One X beat when it comes to running demanding Xbox One games like the aforementioned Gears 5. But the difference is arguably not profound enough to warrant dropping nearly $500 on a machine that’s hardly flush with true next-gen games. If you're on the fence, I’d say you could probably wait and get another year’s use out of your One X before the Series X starts to look very tempting. 

Regardless, if you do get an Xbox Series X, you're buying one rather impressive games console, which will deliver an impressive gaming experience right now, and likely a stellar one in 12 months' time.

Xbox Series X review: Verdict 

The Xbox Series X is the one Xbox to rule them all. It’s a single machine that’ll run generations of Xbox games, and run them well. Furthermore, it’ll do so without looking fussy or making a racket. 

Sure, $499 is still a good wad of cash to drop on a gaming machine that hasn't yet shown any breathtaking next-gen capabilities. But I think it’s a reasonable price to pay for the tech you’re getting. The latest AMD processor and graphics technology promises a lot of power, and the joy of loading games up in mere seconds rather than minutes can’t be underestimated. While PCs have had SSDs for a while now, you'd struggle to build a gaming machine with this power and advanced storage for $1,000, let alone half that price. 

I was originally expecting to feel a little disappointed with the Series X, given that there’s no one killer app or game to really make it feel like a next-gen powerhouse. But as games now look so good, we’re not going to get the graphical leap we've seen in previous generation consoles. Rather, the Series X is all about making the experience of gaming easier, faster and just better. 

With that in mind, the Xbox Series X is a triumph in the here and now. But I can’t wait to see what it will be able to do in a year’s time. 

  • smalltown2
    Are you able to comment on screen aspect ratios that are available on the Xbox series X ?
    I have been debating on whether or not to purchase an ultra widescreen monitor, and was hoping to see a 21:9 aspect ration on the Xbox series X.
    Reply