Aventon Aventure.2 review

This fat-tire ebike will get you anywhere you need to go

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park
(Image: © Tom's Guide)

Tom's Guide Verdict

Fun to ride and very capable in all conditions, the Aventon Aventure.2 is an excellent multi-surface commuter bike that you’ll be happy to have in winter conditions. The brake lights and turn signals are excellent touches, too.

Pros

  • +

    Very fun ride with excellent pedaling assist response

  • +

    Stable and capable in all conditions, including snow

  • +

    Has both lights and turn signals

Cons

  • -

    Very heavy bike

  • -

    Suspension fork is unnecessary

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Aventon Aventure.2: Specs

Weight: 77 pounds
Motor: 750 watts, 48V, rear hub motor
Battery: Removable Lithium-Ion, 48V, 15Ah
Charge time: 4-5 hours
Max assist speed: 28mph
Assist levels: 4
Throttle: included
Weight limit: 400lbs
Max advertised range: 60 miles
Drivetrain: 8-Speed 

The fat tire craze has been a staple of the mountain bike world for some time, and in recent years that massive rubber has made it onto other types of bikes — notably, electric commuter bikes like the Aventon Aventure.2. At first it seems gimmicky: who really needs that much rubber to roll down the road? 

When the road is covered in snow, or if that road isn’t paved, or if that road simply isn’t maintained, the Aventure.2 shines enough to answer that question. There are also big benefits to those big tires that go beyond the terrain it can grapple with. Comfort increases significantly, too. 

But, is this the best electric bike to get you to and from your work? Read the rest of our Aventon Aventure.2 review to find out.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Price and availability

The Aventure.2 costs $1,899 and is available for purchase directly through Aventon’s website. Financing is available through Affirm if you want to break the cost into payments. 

On top of that, Aventon offers optional accident protection through Extend, which covers certain damages to the bike with no deductibles. Choose from three plans ranging in price from $119 for one year, up to $239 for three years. 

The Aventure.2 is available now on Aventon’s website, which also features a dealer locator should you prefer to buy in person.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Design

The fat tires tell part of the story: The Aventure.2 is intended to go anywhere in just about any condition. A suspension fork with 80mm of travel reinforces that notion. On top of that, the Aventure.2 comes with powerful hydraulic disc brakes for reliable stopping power in all conditions.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

You can choose from two sizes: Regular for riders from 5’3” to 5’10”, and Large for riders 5’10” to 6’4”. Shorter riders can also opt for the step-through design that offers more clearance between you and the frame.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Regardless of what size you choose, the Aventure.2 comes with an 8-speed drivetrain, fenders, and integrated lights. Notably, the lights function as turn signals and brake lights too.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The Aventure.2 is set up as a class 2 ebike out of the box (which gives you an assist up to 20 MPH), but you can configure it for class 3 use (which boosts it to 28 MPH) using the Aventon app. The app also gives you the capability to record your rides, and even share those rides with the Aventon community.

Just about all other adjustments can be done right on the bike using the full color LCD display. You can change the assist levels using the handlebar-mounted buttons. That’s also where you’ll operate the turn signals. The throttle control is just inboard of the handlebar buttons.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The motor is built into the rear hub of the bike. A torque sensor measures your pedaling input and amplifies your cadence. That means the harder or faster you pedal, the more assist you’ll get.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Performance

The Aventure.2 weighs 77 pounds, and that weight is immediately noticeable before you even start pedaling. Maneuvering the bike can be a bit cumbersome. 

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Once you’re up and riding, the weight becomes less of an issue. It’s a super fun ride, and those big, wide tires mean you can monster-truck your way over lots of obstacles. Riding the Aventure.2 in the snow was particularly fun, as the big tires (with lowered tire pressure) offer plenty of traction and stability.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The fenders wrap around the tires nicely to keep road spray off of you. The Aventure.2 is truly meant for all conditions, and the bike certainly stood up to such tests. The motor is strong and quick to engage, powering the bike through mud, dirt, snow, and pavement with ease. There’s very little lag between pedaling input and the motor’s engagement, and the throttle engagement is quick too, though perhaps a hair slower than the response from pedaling input.

I was impressed with the Aventure.2’s response to pedaling torque. The motor kicks in with more assist when you push down on the pedals with more force, even just for one pedal stroke. It’s an easy way to get going faster when you’re approaching a hill.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The Aventure.2 is equipped with brake lights and turn signals. The brake lights illuminate automatically, which is a nice touch not found on most ebikes. The turn signals are cool too, but you have to remember to use them — which I often didn’t. Still, the light system is a great advantage for city commuters.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

The suspension fork is the Aventure.2’s weakness. It’s not a particularly smooth-feeling bit of suspension, and ultimately, with the tires as large as they are, the suspension fork really isn’t necessary. Bigger tires mean you can run lower tire pressures, which adds more than enough comfort and compliance to the ride. The suspension fork is therefore just added weight and complexity for little real benefit.

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

My test bike came with the optional rear rack. It installed in just a few minutes and felt stable. It’s a great place to tote what you’re carrying, though you’ll need to find a way to secure your loads, since Aventon does not include any straps.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Battery life and performance

The battery is mounted conveniently in the down tube of the Aventure.2. It’s removable using the included keys. That means you can pop the battery out for easier charging or safekeeping. 

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Aventon advertises up to 60-mile range per charge. That’s largely dependent on what assist mode you use, what terrain you ride on, and other riding conditions. If you just use the throttle without pedaling, Aventon says you can get up to 30 miles out of a single charge.

My first ride on the Aventure.2 was a ten-mile round trip. I used a mix of pedaling assist and throttle, and I kept the assist level on the highest setting (Turbo). By the end of my ride, I had worn the battery down to 80%. That’s in keeping with Aventon’s advertised range estimates.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Accessories

The Aventon website has a large online store full of parts and accessories to customize your ride. My test bike came with fenders, and Aventon sent along a rear rack for me to test as well. 

Aventon Aventure.2 sitting outside at park

(Image credit: Tom's Guide)

If I was to request another upgrade, it would be the front rack, which allows riders to carry even more cargo up front.

If you’re after as much comfort as possible, you could even add a suspension seatpost — though as I mentioned, the big tires at low pressure already add quite a lot of comfort and compliance.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: The competition

The Aventure.2’s most direct competition is the Velotric Nomad 1. The Nomad also features oversized tires that make it appropriate for many surfaces from pavement to dirt and snow. It also features a front suspension fork which feels largely extraneous. While both the Nomad and the Aventure.2 are both very capable and fun bikes, the Nomad is $300 less expensive. It doesn’t come with the nifty brake lights and turn signals, though. 

Lectric’s XP 2.0 puts a unique spin on the fat tire bike. It’s also a multi-surface master, but it comes in a diminutive folding package. You can fold up the bike and stow it easily in an apartment or other small space. It’s also less expensive than both the Nomad and the Aventure.2 at $1,000.

Aventon Aventure.2 review: Verdict

As a multi-surface commuter, the Aventure.2 shines. It’s capable of rolling easily over dirt, through mud and snow, or just zipping along on pavement. The turn signals and rear brake lights offer nice commuting features you won’t find on many other ebikes on the market. And the torque sensor makes for a wonderfully tailored assist experience. 

The Aventure.2’s biggest drawbacks are its weight and the suspension fork. If you’ll be carrying the bike upstairs, the Aventure.2 may not be the best option for you. The suspension fork feels largely unnecessary, too, and a rigid fork (without suspension) might even shave off a pound or two. But overall, it’s a very capable bike for getting you to and from the office — wherever that happens to be.

Dan Cavallari

Dan Cavallari is the former technical editor for VeloNews Magazine, who currently reviews electric bikes, bike lights, and other bike accessories for Tom's Guide. In addition to VeloNews, his work has appeared in Triathlete Magazine, Rouleur Magazine, CyclingTips.com, Road Bike Action, Mountain Bike Action, CycleVolta.com, Tomsguide.com, and much more. Dan also hosts two podcasts on his site, Slow Guy on the Fast Ride: One is about cycling and other outdoor activities, while the other looks at mental health issues. Most recently, Dan also covered the 2022 Tour de France. Dan lives outside of Denver, Colorado with his family.