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Samsung Galaxy S22 and S22 Plus leak reveals all about the cameras

a Galaxy s22 concept graphic based on new rumors about the phone's design
(Image credit: Super Roader/YouTube)

We're expecting the Samsung Galaxy S22 to be the first big flagship phone of 2022, so all eyes are on its rumored specs. The most recent alleged leak is all about the camera improvements for the Galaxy S22 and Galaxy S22 Pro/Plus. 

The new info, courtesy of reliable source Ice Universe (opens in new tab), detail what sensors we can expect in the Galaxy S22 and the larger Galaxy S22 Pro. As the leaker writes in their leak, both the Galaxy S22 and S22 Plus will reportedly make use of a new 50MP sensor in their main cameras.

That would probably be the Samsung GN5 sensor that Samsung unveiled earlier in the year, and that has already been providing impressive results on the Google Pixel 6.

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IceUniverse's tweet translated from Chinese, via Google Translate

"Samsung S22 (6.06 inches) and S22+ (6.55 inches) camera parameters:

Main camera: 50MP 1/1.57 1um F1.8

Telephoto: 3X 10MP 1/3.94 1um F2.4

Ultra wide angle: 12MP 1/2.55" 1.4um F2.2

Front shot: 10MP 1/3.24" 1.22um F2.2"

This camera sensor is capable of full 50MP shots, as well as lower-resolution 12.5MP images achieved using "pixel-binning." That's the software process that combines data captured by the sensor's pixels together into virtual super-pixels, resulting in improved image brightness.

The Galaxy S21 and Galaxy S21 Plus both used 12MP main cameras, so if these changes turn out to be true, S22 and S22 Plus users would see a nice resolution boost when using the full 50MP mode, or notably brighter images when in the pixel-binning mode that these high-resolution cameras tend to default to.

The other camera upgrade that Ice Universe mentions is the 10MP 3x optical zoom telephoto camera. The Galaxy S21 and S21 Plus had a higher resolution 48MP telephoto camera, but with inferior 3x hybrid zoom, which used digital zoom alongside a weaker optical zoom.

Finally, Ice Universe tips a 12MP ultrawide camera and 10MP selfie camera for the two phones. These aren't a surprise, as these match the equivalent cameras on the S21 and S21 Plus. Looking at the specs more closely, it appears these sensors are exactly the same as the ones on the Galaxy S21. That could mean there will be a less noticeable quality difference when taking ultrawide shots or selfies, though this doesn't count computational photography upgrades.

Samsung won't be hiding that selfie camera under the screen for the Galaxy S22, according to older leaks. There had been rumors early on that Samsung would give the Galaxy S22 an under-display selfie camera, like the one it fitted to the Galaxy Z Fold 3's internal display. That's apparently not going to be the case, which we're glad about since the Z Fold 3's 2MP under-display camera took some rather disappointing images.

The final thing we can glean from IU's tweet is the size of the phones: 6.06 inches for the base Galaxy S22, and 6.55 inches for the S22 Pro/Plus. These are both smaller than the equivalent models from this year, — the 6.2-inch S21 and 6.7-inch S21 Plus. While that means smaller displays (and also smaller capacity batteries according to other corroborating leaks), it will mean the phones fit better in smaller hands and tight pockets, which remains an important consideration for smartphones.

We expect to see Samsung launch the Galaxy S22 series in early 2022, but perhaps not around its normal time. The January launch window may in fact belong to the Galaxy S21 FE, which has suffered from long delays. The S22 reveal therefore could be pushed back to February, a recent leak claims.

Check out our Galaxy S22 hub for all the latest rumors and leaks as we get closer to launch. 

Richard Priday
Richard Priday

Richard is a Tom's Guide staff writer based in London, covering news, reviews and how-tos for phones, gaming, audio and whatever else people need advice on. Following on from his MA in Magazine Journalism at the University of Sheffield, he's also written for WIRED U.K., The Register and Creative Bloq. When not at work, he's likely thinking about how to brew the perfect cup of specialty coffee.