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How to install Android apps on Windows 11

A Windows 11 laptop, demonstrating how to install Android apps on Windows 11
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

If you want to run your favourite phone apps on your PC, you'll need to know how to install Android apps on Windows 11. We're here to help.

When Windows 11 was announced, one of its most interesting features was the ability to install and run Android apps natively, rather than relying on third-party methods. And while the feature wasn't made available upon the OS's release, if you're based in the US, it's now possible to install Android apps on your PC natively.

You can run Android apps on Windows 11 thanks to a collaboration between Microsoft and Amazon, with apps being supplied from Amazon's own app store. Admittedly, with the Amazon Appstore still being in preview, the selection isn't that great so far. Still, if you want to play a round or two of Subway Surfers without having to bust your phone out, Windows 11 has you covered.

The initial setup takes a while, since some underlying software needs to be installed first to make Android apps run natively on your PC. After that though, installing Android apps on your PC is as easy as installing them on your phone or tablet. So, if you're ready, here's how to install Android apps on Windows 11.

Note: As mentioned, installing Android apps on Windows 11 is only officially available to US-based users for the time being.


If you're thinking about upgrading your PC, we've compared a range of the best Windows laptops, best computers and best all-in-one computers on the market, to help you make the right choice. Make sure you give them a read after you're done here.


How to install Android apps on Windows 11

1. Open the Microsoft Store by typing "Store" into the Start menu and clicking it.

(Image credit: Future)

2. Search for "Amazon Appstore" and click it when it appears, then click Install to install Amazon's store. Yes, you're installing an app store from within an app store — very meta.

(Image credit: Future)

3. After clicking Install, you'll be asked to install the Windows Subsystem for Android, which is some underlying software that allows Android apps to function on your PC. Click through the first two prompts (Set up; Download) to begin the process, and wait for it to download.

(Image credit: Future)

4. Once the software has finished downloading, click Next and you'll be asked to restart your PC. If you're ready, click Restart.

(Image credit: Future)

5. Once your PC has restarted, Amazon Appstore should open automatically. If not, open it manually by locating it in the Start menu. Once opened, sign in using your Amazon account details, or create on Amazon account if you don't have one already.

(Image credit: Future)

6. You'll now be presented with the (admittedly small) list of available apps, while you can also search the library using the bar at the top. Once you've found an app you want to install, select Get underneath the app's tile and then click Download.

(Image credit: Future)

7. Once your app is installed, you can open it by either clicking the Open button underneath its entry in Amazon Appstore, or by locating it in the Start menu.

(Image credit: Future)

And that's it. Hopefully, over time, Amazon will add a more inspiring selection to its Windows app store, since the choice currently there is paltry, to say the least. In the meantime, the best Android apps remain the reserve of the Play Store.

Now you've learned how to install Android apps on Windows 11, you may also find our guides on how to upgrade to Windows 11 from Windows 10 or how to enable God Mode in Windows 11 or 10 helpful. If you're interested in more Android themed guides, why not read our guides on how to enable Secure Folder on Android, how to transfer data from Android to Android, how to record a call on Android and how to screen record on the Samsung Galaxy S22.

Dale Fox
Dale Fox

Dale Fox is a freelance journalist based in the UK. He's been a tech nerd ever since childhood, when he used the money from his first job as a paperboy to buy a subscription to GamesMaster magazine. Dale was previously a presenter and editor in China, where he also worked as a copywriter for OnePlus at its Shenzhen HQ.