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Norton Anti-Theft Takes Mugshot of Device-Stealing Thief

By - Source: Symantec | B 14 comments

Norton Anti-Theft will track down your lost or stolen notebook, tablet or smartphone. It will even take a picture of the surrounding area, or the face of alleged thief.

Tuesday Symantec launched Norton Anti-Theft, a Web-based service that allows consumers to remotely lock, locate and recover a lost or stolen Windows-based laptop, Android smartphone or Android tablet. The release is part of Symantec's Norton Everywhere initiative, which extends Norton’s security expertise and technologies to protect consumers everywhere they go, regardless of device or platform.

"Laptops, smartphones and tablets have become more personal than ever because consumers can take them wherever they go," said Dave Cole, vice president of mobile products at Norton. "However, the convenience of mobility also brings the risk of theft or accidental loss, so safeguards need to be in place. Norton Anti-Theft allows consumers to take defensive measures in preparing for the worst case scenario and proactive measures when an unfortunate incident occurs."

One of the key (and amusing) features of Symantec's Norton Anti-Theft is its ability to take a "sneak peek" snapshot of anyone or anything in front of the lost or stolen webcam-equipped device. Once acquired, the image is saved to the Norton Anti-Theft website so that users can visually track down their property.

In addition to the Sneak Peek feature, Symantec's Norton Auto-Theft also tracks and maps the location of the stolen/lost device when anyone uses it to go online. Subscribers can also securely lock the device to prevent others from using it or seeing the stored information. There's also an option to display a customizable message to anyone who finds the missing device so that owners can make arrangements to get it back.

Symantec claims that Norton Anti-Theft works securely over the Internet so that users can easily track, locate, and lock their devices anytime, anywhere. The service comes with free support by way of phone, email, live chat or via the Norton Anti-Theft website.

Subscribers to Norton Anti-Theft can track up to ten devices, but that secure feeling comes with a price: $89.99 per year. Additional subscription plans include $39.99 per year for 3 devices, and $59.99 per year for 5 devices. Norton Anti-Theft even supports all web browsers, so there's no software to install on all three platforms.

To see a video demonstration of Symantec's new anti-theft service, head here.

Discuss
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  • 5 Hide
    Parsian , October 5, 2011 2:08 PM
    im sticking with MSE
  • 6 Hide
    keczapifrytki , October 5, 2011 2:23 PM
    Kind of useless since all it takes for the thief to do is a complete format of the computer, no? The reinstall should be easy as nearly all laptops have the Windows product key on the bottom. Just my two cents.
  • 0 Hide
    alyoshka , October 5, 2011 2:51 PM
    You still have to instal Norton Anti-Theft right? on all three platforms if you want them recovered, if they ever got stolen.
    Can you imagine the cheesy line"Sneak Peek" that is used, a snap shot taken at the wrong time could end up on the norton website. Wouldn't we love to see all those sneak peeks....
  • 2 Hide
    shadamus , October 5, 2011 3:18 PM
    Like any tool, it has potential for misuse.

    For instance: When the pervs of the world figure it out and loan their laptop to their neighbor, or leave their smartphone strategically placed at a friends house... instant spy cam.
  • -2 Hide
    cats_Paw , October 5, 2011 4:38 PM
    So basicly the thief will now steal the laptop, and then leave the hdd :D .
  • 3 Hide
    Inferno1217 , October 5, 2011 5:38 PM
    A piece of tape over the camera should do the trick.
  • -1 Hide
    WyomingKnott , October 5, 2011 6:53 PM
    Next: Anonymous shuts down every device with Norton Anti-Theft.
  • -1 Hide
    dextermat , October 5, 2011 7:00 PM
    If only Norton would not turn my core i7 system into a 286 system .. (sooooo slow)
    I might consider using it.
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , October 5, 2011 9:11 PM
    Quote:
    Symantec claims that Norton Anti-Theft works securely over the Internet
    So if the thief takes your laptop but doesn't go on the internet then he's safe right? Also I'm sure "locking" the computer just means putting a password and not encrypting the hard drive or locking the bios. So you can just pop in a live cd (like ubuntu) and have unlimited access.

    Quote:
    also tracks and maps the location of the stolen/lost device when anyone uses it to go online
    So how will this fair against nearly all laptops that doesn't have GPS built it? IP can only approximate the city its in unless the police gets a warrant to ask the ISP for who that is (highly unlikely).


    Another useless product by Norton!
  • 0 Hide
    otacon72 , October 5, 2011 10:17 PM
    dextermatIf only Norton would not turn my core i7 system into a 286 system .. (sooooo slow)I might consider using it.


    I don't even notice it on my core i7, i5 or i3 computers. Its the best out there hands down.
  • 1 Hide
    halcyon , October 5, 2011 10:22 PM
    otacon72I don't even notice it on my core i7, i5 or i3 computers. Its the best out there hands down.


    I, indeed, had heard that the latest Norton was no longer a resource hog that horribly affected computers. However, I think they earned a bad reputation that's going to be hard to dispel.

    I'm glad Avast works well enough for me and is free.
  • 0 Hide
    aliened , October 5, 2011 10:26 PM
    There's a little thing called "Prey Project" that does the same, and you know which is the best part? that it´s FREE.
  • 0 Hide
    eddieroolz , October 6, 2011 3:09 AM
    Its possibly useful but Norton, I do not trust.
  • 0 Hide
    nikorr , October 17, 2011 9:32 AM
    Latest Norton is not bad anymore, for those who remember....
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