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iOS Apps Four Times More Profitable Than Android Store

By - Source: App Annie Intelligence (PDF) | B 28 comments

Google sees app revenue growth of 311 percent.

While the Apple App Store is four times more profitable than Google Play, Android's revenue for apps has risen by 311 percent since January and 17.9 percent during the last month.

Comparatively, Apple's app revenue has increased by 12.9 percent this year, but decreased by 0.7 percent in the last month. iOS, however, boasts 10 percent more volume of global free apps downloaded when compared to Android.

That said, Google Play's growth stands at 48 percent during the last five months, while Apple settled for a 3.3 percent growth rate in the free app market.

"The gap between global revenue on iOS and Google Play is still there," said Bertrand Schmitt, App Annie CEO. "But the gap is shrinking every month, creating more opportunities for publishers to generate significant revenue growth in several countries on Google Play."

"Although, in the most recent month, growth has slowed considerably, and the question remains, can Google Play keep growing at a lightning pace?" the report added.

Since its inception, the Google Play store has, as of September, exceeded the 25 billion downloads millstone. Last month saw Google Play matching the same amount of iOS apps with 700,000 applications available for download.

 

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  • 23 Hide
    stingray71 , December 2, 2012 6:26 PM
    You have to acknowledge, Android has come along way. Imagine if Apple didn't have Android competing against it. We'd probably still have the same stale mobile iOS........oh wait. NVM.



  • 13 Hide
    frankbough , December 2, 2012 5:16 PM
    It does need to be about profit if you are a company and you sell software in order to put food on the table. My company sells in the App Store and Google Play and the difference is huge. The only reason we're in Google Play is because we need cross-platform coverage. The app itself will always make a loss because the wages of the developers are way above what we seem to be able to sell.
    The iOS app, meanwhile, just about breaks even. Thank goodness for more profitable desktop software...
  • 13 Hide
    ben850 , December 2, 2012 6:27 PM
    stingray71You have to acknowledge, Android has come along way. Imagine if Apple didn't have Android competing against it. We'd probably still have the same stale mobile iOS........oh wait. NVM.


    LOL
Other Comments
  • 1 Hide
    Onus , December 2, 2012 5:02 PM
    More profitable for whom? And this is a problem because...?

    Not everything needs to be about profit.
  • 13 Hide
    frankbough , December 2, 2012 5:16 PM
    It does need to be about profit if you are a company and you sell software in order to put food on the table. My company sells in the App Store and Google Play and the difference is huge. The only reason we're in Google Play is because we need cross-platform coverage. The app itself will always make a loss because the wages of the developers are way above what we seem to be able to sell.
    The iOS app, meanwhile, just about breaks even. Thank goodness for more profitable desktop software...
  • 23 Hide
    stingray71 , December 2, 2012 6:26 PM
    You have to acknowledge, Android has come along way. Imagine if Apple didn't have Android competing against it. We'd probably still have the same stale mobile iOS........oh wait. NVM.



  • 13 Hide
    ben850 , December 2, 2012 6:27 PM
    stingray71You have to acknowledge, Android has come along way. Imagine if Apple didn't have Android competing against it. We'd probably still have the same stale mobile iOS........oh wait. NVM.


    LOL
  • 10 Hide
    cloakster , December 2, 2012 6:37 PM
    Imo, it has nothing to do with the OS itself, it has to do with the type of customers that by iPhone's vs Android phones. The people with tons of money that just want 'The best' end up buying iPhones and those people are more inclined to spend lots of money in the app store. There is also a large % of people who buy Android because there are a lot of better priced phones on the platform and they are usually going to be much more careful when buying apps.
  • 13 Hide
    NightLight , December 2, 2012 6:47 PM
    title should read: ios apps four times more expensive than android apps
  • 2 Hide
    zybch , December 2, 2012 7:09 PM
    In other news, 4 times as many apps on iOS require payment than on android, 4 times as many apps require payment on iOS than android.
  • -4 Hide
    otacon72 , December 2, 2012 8:30 PM
    NightLighttitle should read: ios apps four times more expensive than android apps


    Um they cost the same twit.
  • -4 Hide
    wemakeourfuture , December 2, 2012 8:52 PM
    NightLighttitle should read: ios apps four times more expensive than android apps


    They cost the same. Should read Android users 4 times cheaper to pay $1.00 for apps or Android Users pirate 4 times more than iOS users for $1.00 apps
  • 3 Hide
    NuclearShadow , December 2, 2012 8:53 PM
    While the gap is shrinking I think Android has one flaw that will keep it from beating iOS.
    That flaw is it's too easy to pirate on the platform. If we were to calculate pirated apps/games
    and mix put that into the total I am sure the gap would be much smaller.

    While in my personal opinion Android is the superior OS and it's openness makes it even greater it does come with that one draw back if you are a app developer. As long as iPhones and iPads continue to sell they will bring in more sales and revenue for developers.
  • 3 Hide
    wemakeourfuture , December 2, 2012 9:02 PM
    OnusMore profitable for whom? And this is a problem because...?Not everything needs to be about profit.


    Generally people want to get some compensation for their time and efforts. I'd think if a company hired developers to make software they'd have the expectations to make their money back and some profit. You know the thing Samsung does with their phones? Make a product to sell to make money. You know what Microsoft does with its software.

    If someone has a hobby and wants to provide something for free, awesome! But a lot of people have an opportunity cost associated with the time takes to develop and app and want to make money from it either directly or indirectly.
  • 3 Hide
    halcyon , December 2, 2012 9:10 PM
    Though I switched from iOS to Android I have to be honest and say I think the App store's offerings have been better than Google's play store. Even an old favorite like Monopoly is higher quality from the App store. ...but Android is getting better and is notably better than it was a year ago. My S3 is way better than any iPhone IMO and I have faith in Android and the Play store.
  • -4 Hide
    house70 , December 2, 2012 9:58 PM
    NuclearShadowWhile the gap is shrinking I think Android has one flaw that will keep it from beating iOS. That flaw is it's too easy to pirate on the platform. If we were to calculate pirated apps/games and mix put that into the total I am sure the gap would be much smaller.While in my personal opinion Android is the superior OS and it's openness makes it even greater it does come with that one draw back if you are a app developer. As long as iPhones and iPads continue to sell they will bring in more sales and revenue for developers.

    You can't install (sideload) pirated apps on Android unless you tinker with at least 2 different developer options in settings. Even so, some apps require root, which means additional tinkering.
    If you want the freedom of Android and the feel that you actually own your phone and make it unique, you get it. OTOH, if you want your phone to be identical to the one next to it, go for iOS. In that case, you'll want everyone to drive the same car(make/model) as you do, live in identical houses that look all the same (inside and out), maybe have identical looking spouses... You get the drift.
  • 1 Hide
    kinggraves , December 3, 2012 2:19 AM
    The people that buy Apple products are the people who don't mind paying extra for the same product due to an image and imagined quality difference. People with that extra disposable income will also be likely to spend it on apps they don't need to pay for, rather than find an alternative. There is also the fact that when you buy things from one device, you end up locked in that device. Someone with a sizeable app collection from Apple is not going to switch to Android and force themselves to buy those apps again. This leaves them continuing to buy more from Apple, making their reluctance to switch greater. The market would be different if app licenses were movable between ecosystems.

    People that use Android are better informed about their decisions and only buy what they need, which usually isn't much. With free Ebook readers, music players, video players, etc, reality is the average consumer doesn't really "need" to buy any apps. It has nothing to do with Apple being a money magnet, the same consumers buying apps would buy the apps on Android if Apple was not around.
  • 1 Hide
    halcyon , December 3, 2012 7:49 AM
    kinggravesThe people that buy Apple products are the people who don't mind paying extra for the same product due to an image and imagined quality difference. People with that extra disposable income will also be likely to spend it on apps they don't need to pay for, rather than find an alternative. There is also the fact that when you buy things from one device, you end up locked in that device. Someone with a sizeable app collection from Apple is not going to switch to Android and force themselves to buy those apps again. This leaves them continuing to buy more from Apple, making their reluctance to switch greater. The market would be different if app licenses were movable between ecosystems.People that use Android are better informed about their decisions and only buy what they need, which usually isn't much. With free Ebook readers, music players, video players, etc, reality is the average consumer doesn't really "need" to buy any apps. It has nothing to do with Apple being a money magnet, the same consumers buying apps would buy the apps on Android if Apple was not around.

    Possibly. ...but possibly not. Again, I noticed desirable apps in the app store that are simply not available in the play store (ie., Pinball HD). While there may be alternatives they'r often not as high quality IME. I do admit that I'm more picky than most. However, my S3 is worth it.
  • 1 Hide
    oblivionlord , December 3, 2012 8:09 AM
    Id rather game on a real portable gaming device such as the PS Vita. That's worlds better than iphone5 and any droid phone both combined. The controls arent limited to touch which pertrudes the screen or bluetooth using a controller which has input lag. The only downfall is that it's 'another device' to carry around, but this is the sacrifice if you want real portable gaming. Not the crappy games for IOS or Droid.
  • 0 Hide
    kartu , December 3, 2012 1:01 PM
  • 2 Hide
    kartu , December 3, 2012 1:08 PM
    nuclearshadowWhile the gap is shrinking I think Android has one flaw that will keep it from beating iOS. That flaw is it's too easy to pirate on the platform. If we were to calculate pirated apps/games and mix put that into the total I am sure the gap would be much smaller.

    You know, you are not the only bright person who came to an idea that pirated = lost sale.
    Yet closing megaupload resulted in slight decline of revenues. Strange uh?

    Oh and you know what are the piracy rates on iOS? Let me remind you:
    1) 90% piracy rate (number of times an app got pirated)
    2) only 10% of users actually jailbreak

    Strange uh? Now let me explain it to you, this is because:

    1) Pirates download tons of stuff, most of it BS, generating huge traffic and making bosses behind MAFIAA hysterical about lost income
    2) Most of the pirates would never ever buy most of the stuff they download, many won't buy any

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