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What is Google Fi, and is it worth it?

Google Fi
(Image credit: Future)

Google already makes the operating system that powers your smartphone and, for some of us, makes the phone itself. And if you sign up for Google Fi, the tech giant can provide the cellular service for that phone, too.

Known as Project Fi when it launched in 2015, Google touted its service as an alternate wireless carrier for select Google devices by using a blend of Wi-Fi and other carrier networks to keep you covered. Subscribers were drawn to its pay-only-for-what-you-use approach, too, especially after Google started capping the amount it charges each month.

Half-a-dozen years after its launch, Project Fi is all grown up — so much so that Google changed the name of the service to Google Fi and removed one of its biggest restrictions. While only select phones worked with the service before, now you can use just about any smartphone with Google Fi, including Apple's iPhone. You can even now pick up a SIM kit from Best Buy retail stores and join the service the very same day.

Here’s what you need to know about Google Fi.

What phones can you use with Google Fi?

Phone selection had been the biggest limitation with Project Fi. But now that the service is rebranded as Google Fi, that's changed in a major way.

As before, Google Fi is best experienced on Google's own phones such as the Pixel 5a. The Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro will soon be joining the mix, too. In addition, Google Fi sells phones from other device makers that are optimized for its wireless service. That includes the Galaxy Z Flip 3, Galaxy A32 5G, Galaxy Note 20 and all Galaxy S21 models; available Motorola phones at Google Fi include the Motorola One 5G Ace, Moto G Power and Moto G Play.

These optimized phones are able to take advantage of Fi's intelligent network switching, seamlessly jumping to whatever tower offers the best coverage between T-Mobile, US Cellular and what's left of Sprint. (Sprint merged with T-Mobile, which has absorbed Sprint's network.)

Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro are side by side

The Google Pixel 6 and Pixel 6 Pro are the latest phones coming to Google Fi. (Image credit: Tom's Guide)

Google has also broadened Fi's reach by expanding the number of phones you can use with it. Today, you can sign up using almost any Android phone. If you've got an iPhone, you can sign up for Google Fi, too, using the Google Fi iOS app.

Expanding the number of phones that will work with Google Fi certainly widens the pool of wireless users who can take advantage of Google's straightforward data plan pricing. The trade-off in not using a Fi-approved phone, though, comes with what network you'll use when accessing cellular connectivity. Phones that aren't designed for Fi cannot switch between those three networks, and will make do with T-Mobile connectivity alone.

Like other carriers, Google Fi allows you to transfer your current cellphone number over to its service when you sign up.

What network does Google Fi use?

As with other mobile virtual network operators, or MVNOs, Google Fi relies on another carrier’s network to provide cellular coverage. In Google Fi’s case, a couple of carriers are used — T-Mobile (and what's left of Sprint) and regional carrier US Cellular. For Fi-certified devices, Google says its cellular services determines which carrier has the fastest network where you happen to be and connects you to that one. Should you relocate to an area where another carrier partner has better coverage, you’ll be switched over to the better connection.

In addition to LTE coverage, you can also expect 5G coverage from those networks, if you've got a compatible device — that is, one with a 5G modem.

But cellular coverage is only part of the Project Fi story. Similar to fellow MVNOs Republic Wireless and TextNow, Project Fi also delivers talk, text and data over VPN-protected public Wi-Fi hotspots when a wireless network is available. Again, Google promises seamless switching between Wi-Fi and cellular connections for its Fi-certified devices. And it’s that reliance on Wi-Fi that allows Project Fi to offer lower monthly bills compared to the major carriers.

Things work a little differently if you sign up for Google Fi with another Android device or an iPhone. In that case, your device will be restricted to either T-Mobile's network. You'll also give up that seamless switching over to Google's network of Wi-Fi hotspots when you're out and about.

What are the best Google Fi plans?

Even with its new name and broader array of smartphone options, Google Fi keeps plans simple. You’ve still got Fi's classic offering, called Flexible, which provides unlimited talk and text (including international texting) for $20 a month.

But what about data? You estimate how much data you’ll use each month, paying $10 for each GB. Let’s say you expect to use 3GB per month. That would tack on another $30 to your bill, meaning you can expect to pay $50 each month. Given Google Fi’s use of Wi-Fi when available, you presumably would use less LTE data than you might with a traditional carrier — though that mostly depends on where you

At first glance, that doesn’t compare particularly well to other low-cost carriers. Metro by T-Mobile, one of our top choices among discount carriers, offers a 10GB plan for $40 a month — that same $40 buys you just 2GB of data at Project Fi.

But Google Fi’s appeal lies in the fact that you won’t have to pay for any unused data. Google Fi charges you down to the cent for each MB. Sticking with our 3GB scenario, should you use just 2.2GB in a month, you’ll pay $42 at the end of your billing cycle.

The service's Bill Protection feature effectively adds unlimited data to Google Fi for those who use the standard Flexible plan. Bill Protection caps your monthly bill at $80 a month, or 6GB of data under Google's $10-per-gigabyte pricing. However, you're still able to use data once you go over 6GB without your bill increasing. Only when you hit 15GB of data during a month will Google start to slow your data speeds.

You can add additional people to your Google Fi account for another $15 per line. Everyone on the account draws from the same pool of LTE data, so a family of four that uses 9.5GB a month would pay $160, which is what T-Mobile charges that same family for unlimited data. Bill Protection works on multiline accounts, too, though the cap varies depending on how many lines of data you have.

More recently, Google Fi introduced a true Unlimited option that costs $70 per month for a single user and comes with Google One cloud storage membership included. That translates to $60 per month for two users each, or $50 for three. Four or more users on a plan will be charged $45 for each line. Like other carriers' unlimited offerings, this one has a deprioritization point, whereupon data consumed past a limit of 22GB will be throttled relative to others users. 

There's one other unlimited data plan option at Google Fi. Called Simply Unlimited, it starts at $60 per month for one line. However, you'd give up a lot of the perks that makes Google Fi so appealing — there's no coverage if you travel overseas, you don't get any Google One cloud storage, and you can't tether.

What special features does Google Fi offer?

Besides rebates on unused data, most Google Fi customers are able to use their phones as a wireless hotspot for no additional cost, though any data they use comes out of their monthly allotment. Simply Unlimited plans don't offer hotspot capabilities.

Google Fi’s real special feature should appeal to international travelers: You’re able to draw from your regular pool of data in 200-plus countries, without having to pay any roaming fees. To put that in context, T-Mobile lets you use unlimited data when traveling in 200-plus countries, but it severely limits your speed. Verizon charges you $5 to $10 per day depending on where you’re traveling to use your data plan overseas, unless you're paying for its most expensive unlimited plan.

As noted above, unlimited international texting is included with your Google Fi plan. Phone calls in more than 200 countries will cost you 20 cents a minute over cellular connections; rates vary for Wi-Fi calls.

Google has implemented an option called Enhanced Network that routes all internet connections through the company's secure VPN. This means that whether you're on mobile data or one of Google's 2 million free public hotspots, your data is private and cannot be viewed by anyone — T-Mobile, Sprint, US Cellular or even Google itself. This feature does result in 10 percent more data usage than normal by Google's estimation, though it's definitely a worthwhile addition for those concerned about security. It's only available to Fi-certified phones, however.

Google Fi also offers a referral program in which you can get a $20 credit for each new user you bring into the Google Fi fold. You're capped at 10 referral credits, or $200.

What is Pixel Pass?

As part of the Pixel 6 launch, Google Fi is introducing a program called Pixel Pass. Under this program, you buy your phone for a monthly fee and get subscriptions to a number of Google services — Google One storage, YouTube Premium and YouTube Music Premium streaming, and Google Play Pass gaming. You also get Preferred Care, which offers two years of accidental-damage coverage and one year of mechanical-breakdown coverage.

A promotional image for Google Pixel Pass

(Image credit: Google)

Pixel Pass costs $45 a month for the Pixel 6 and $55 a month for the Pixel 6 Pro. We have a breakdown on whether Pixel Pass is worth it. You do save money on all those subscriptions over time, but if you're not planning on signing up for them, it is a two-year commitment, which might cramp some users' styles.

After two years, though, you are eligible to upgrade to a new Pixel phone, so that's another possible perk.

What do customers say about Google Fi?

Reviews of Google Fi posted by the service’s users in the rebranded Google Fi app are a love-fest for Google’s wireless service. Fi gets an average rating of 4.5 out of 5, with more than 80 percent of customers posting 5-star reviews. Customers like paying only for the data they use and the lower monthly bills. The few complaints on the Google Fi app concern call quality.

MORE: 5 Sneaky Ways Your Wireless Carrier Is Ripping You Off

That pretty much squares with the wider perception of Google's service, which has won the Readers' Choice Award as Project Fi at PC Mag for three years running. Other reviews at Computerworld and Forbes are similarly glowing, praising the services customer service and simplified billing. Those reviews do acknowledge the limitation on supported phones, and the Forbes reviewer suggested that heavy data users won’t get much bill satisfaction from Google Fi.

We've reviewed Google Fi, testing it on both optimized phones and regular handsets, and we think it delivers an unparalleled customer experience, even if other carriers offer cheaper plans and you get the most out of Google's service with an optimized device. Google Fi also offers our favorite cell phone plan for international travelers.

Google Fi outlook

There are some clear advantages to Google Fi, from the straightforward billing to the monthly credits for unused data. Bill Protection makes Google's service even more appealing for heavy-data users. If you prefer Google’s Pixel phones, the service is a no-brainer, and international travelers will love the convenience of using their regular data plan to stay connected on the go.

Since Google Fi has been expanded to work with phones beyond Google-approved ones, more users can give this service a try, though you're sacrificing some of the benefits of having an optimized device.

Other carriers may offer more aggressively priced data plans, though Bill Protection makes Google Fi more competitive for heavy data users. You may not reap Google Fi’s benefits if you’re not around Wi-Fi as much, though. That said, fans of Google devices will find plenty to like about Google Fi.

  • StephenFeather
    I was in one of the first beta batches of users to test Project Fi. Bought a full priced Nexus 6. Despite some bumps in the road, the service was stable and engineers answered trouble tickets pretty fast. That was 3 years ago.

    After a year, bought my wife a full priced Nexus 5x and moved her from Verizon to ProjectFi.

    Since then I upgraded to a Pixel. When everyone else is getting security patches on the 5th of each month, Project Fi pixel users don't get updates until around the week of the 15th of each month.

    In June, the Nexus 5x began to bootloop. After 2 days on the phone with tier 1 support, finally got passed up to the next tier. Project Fi offered to replace the Nexus 5x with a rebuilt model. After 2 days with no news on when this replacement would ship, we bought a cheap pay as you go sim, dropped it into an old samsung s3 and forwarded the project fi number to that device while we waited. We finally get a tracking number...that never leaves the warehouse. The Nexus 5x order is then canceled. Another day of calling, 'we have shipping problems'.

    After another day, another Supervisor arranges for a full refund of the Nexus 5x. We package it up and ship it to texas. Order a Pixel to put on the wife's fi account. Four weeks after google received the device, the refund has not been posted back to the payment method. Send an email, told 'it will be refunded'.

    And this is where the hell begins. The refund of $454.77 is returned across 2 different Visa accounts. Its refunded in 8 payments, the smallest being $2.76.

    As soon as the credits are issued, Project Fi then pulled 3 debits from one of the accounts totaling $375.38.

    We paid ourselves the refund.

    We spent a week trying to talk to someone at Project Fi support who would understand this, got a lot of 'we are so sorry, we understand, we are working on it.

    (Eventually the $357.38 shows up as a 'credit' on her account.)

    The next Monday I went to the bank and charged back the 3 unauthorized debits as 'fraud' per the recommendation of the Chase security team.

    Its been another 2 weeks and this week Project Fi decide to add one of the charge backs as a debt against the Project Fi account, so this months bill is $257.

    We are in the middle of a shell game where all they have done is move our money around between various 'accounts'.

    Project Fi? Avoid. Engineers are running the books, not accountants. No one is responsible, and communication is mostly done by email.
    Reply
  • Ryan_350
    Project Fi is amazing! Can't say enough great things about the service people are super helpful will never go back to the big 4 carriers awful awful service... Oh and data is no problem me & my wife have Nexus 6ps ( awesome phones) and each have 1 GB of data here's the kicker we use mabye 200mbs wifi @ home and we both work downtown so wifi, wifi everywhere!! And credits on the bill every month again if you're thinking about it pull the trigger! Google is redefining the mobile game.
    Reply
  • Waltzer
    cAN NOT SEE HOW THIS WOULD WORK IN THE MIDDLE OF FLY OVER COUNTRY?
    Reply
  • rgd1101
    19989682 said:
    cAN NOT SEE HOW THIS WOULD WORK IN THE MIDDLE OF FLY OVER COUNTRY?

    If the plane have wifi. but probably pay for it.
    Reply
  • Luis_101
    I have been using Project Fi for almost a year and I love it!
    I don´t need to gather the patience to deal with customer service, can control my costs really well (usually wont surpass 2gb of data), and when traveling, Fi has been a godsend.

    Granted, that this carrier is not for everyone. It just does not make sense for those who use lots of data, or those in T-mobile or Sprint deadspots.


    Tip: If you won´t be using Fi for a period of time, you can pause the service in within the app. Fi will not charge you for that period!

    Reply
  • rgd1101
    20031451 said:
    I have been using Project Fi for almost a year and I love it!
    I don´t need to gather the patience to deal with customer service, can control my costs really well (usually wont surpass 2gb of data), and when traveling, Fi has been a godsend.

    Granted, that this carrier is not for everyone. It just does not make sense for those who use lots of data, or those in T-mobile or Sprint deadspots.


    Tip: If you won´t be using Fi for a period of time, you can pause the service in within the app. Fi will not charge you for that period!


    https://fi.google.com/about/faq/#top-faq-5
    Sprint, T-Mobile, and U.S. Cellular
    Reply
  • eryr80
    Sadly my experience differs... If you are in the hinterlands of the US you get the fun of watching people with TMobile and Sprint being able to call but Fi does not work.
    Of you have a problem customer No Service can only apologize and make vague promises.
    Warning consider everything before you use Fi
    Reply
  • paulvotava
    Same here, good if it works, if you have problems like tower switching issues in my case, they leave you hanging for weeks with apologies and no solutions. Stay away!
    Reply
  • mindling
    Project Fi is terrible if you want reliable, seamless communications overseas. It almost never works with local cell carriers, and sometimes works on wi-fi. But I don't have the time when abroad to waste with "FI" drones apologizing and doing very little of value. And besides, how do I communicate with them if my Fi phone doesn't work? They could not replace my Nexus 5P phone, have offered me a refund (I suspect it is their network(s), not the phone. They will not give me a discount to replace the phone, and the new phone is over $650. No thanks.
    Reply
  • paulvotava
    20139455 said:
    Project Fi is terrible if you want reliable, seamless communications overseas. It almost never works with local cell carriers, and sometimes works on wi-fi. But I don't have the time when abroad to waste with "FI" drones apologizing and doing very little of value. And besides, how do I communicate with them if my Fi phone doesn't work? They could not replace my Nexus 5P phone, have offered me a refund (I suspect it is their network(s), not the phone. They will not give me a discount to replace the phone, and the new phone is over $650. No thanks.

    Reply