Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Sony subpoenaed by N.Y. Attorney General

By - Source: New York Times | B 18 comments

Sony just this week responded to questions from congress regarding the PSN and SOE breaches that resulted in a massive amount of user data, including the details of thousands of credit cards, being stolen. Now the company is apparently facing a subpoena from the New York Attorney General.

The New York Times reports that New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has issued a subpoena to three separate divisions of Sony — Sony Computer Entertainment America, Sony Network Entertainment and Sony Online Entertainment. Schneiderman's subpoena carries a similar request to the letter sent by congress last week: he wants to know how Sony is protecting its customers’ personal information.

Sony has already replied to congress with a lengthy letter revealing several new pieces of information regarding the breach that saw the personal information of 77 million users stolen, including how it plans to prevent future attacks and its policies regarding data retention and and data security practices. Considering this, we’re curious to learn whether or not Sony will have anything left to disclose to the Attorney General. Still, the company does plan to respond; speaking to the New York Times, Senior Director of Corporate Communications and Social Media at Sony, Patrick Seybold, said they would review the request.

"We will review and respond to this request, and will continue to work with law enforcement authorities as they investigate the criminal attack on our networks," Seybold told the Times. 

The news comes on the same day as a press release from anonymous denying it was involved in any credit card theft.

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the Streaming Video & TVs forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
  • 0 Hide
    agnickolov , May 6, 2011 3:50 AM
    Makes sense -- they want to find out if this was the result of conscious negligence on Sony's part. E.g. if their engineers have already warned their managers about glaring security holes and were suppressed as often happens.
  • 1 Hide
    soundefx , May 6, 2011 6:56 AM
    If any engineer comes out and said that yes, they knew about it and did nothing, that is one brace engineer.
  • 0 Hide
    txsouthpaw , May 6, 2011 8:09 AM
    N.Y. seems to be the only jurisdiction left in America that cares about consumers. I'm surprised Sony wasn't offered a tax subsidy for their negligence.
  • Display all 18 comments.
  • 2 Hide
    ien2222 , May 6, 2011 8:50 AM
    txsouthpawN.Y. seems to be the only jurisdiction left in America that cares about consumers. I'm surprised Sony wasn't offered a tax subsidy for their negligence.


    Not really, NY is extremely political and they very rarely let a high profile situation (good or bad) go to waste.
  • 1 Hide
    Dreamion , May 6, 2011 11:02 AM
    Should a customer that has used a credit card on any of soe's programs request a new card from their bank, or was it only those up til 07' that were stolen, those cards are probably outdated now anyways?
  • 1 Hide
    techguy911 , May 6, 2011 11:32 AM
    It has already been found that sony WAS using outdated server software on their web servers they also knew that said servers had problems to save money they did not update servers so the fact is they were responsible for what happened by not updating to a more secure version.

    It all has to do with management decisions they have final say for spending money on server software updates even though they may deny it.
  • -1 Hide
    dark_lord69 , May 6, 2011 1:49 PM
    DreamioNShould a customer that has used a credit card on any of soe's programs request a new card from their bank, or was it only those up til 07' that were stolen, those cards are probably outdated now anyways?

    1st - Call Experian (the credit reporting agnecy) and just add a "Fraud Alert" they will contact the other credit reporting agencies and do the same for you. This will make it very difficult for someone to get credit in your name.
    2nd - If you still have an use a card that you gave to Sony I would cancel it and order a new one. Personally I don't have to worry cause I lost that card a while back and had already ordered a new card so my old one they had on file is not valid.
    3rd - If someone calls out of the blue that you don't know and they are asking for any information at all don't answer them, just hang up. Same with e-mails, if it's not from a friend or family member assume it's a phishing e-mail and throw it away.

    Take these steps above and I promise you will have nothing to worry about.
  • 2 Hide
    brianfulcher15 , May 6, 2011 1:57 PM
    bets the govt. fines them for this, but we the citizens who got our id's stolen will not see a dime from the fine.
  • 1 Hide
    marvin-hhgttg , May 6, 2011 2:17 PM
    brianfulcher15bets the govt. fines them for this, but we the citizens who got our id's stolen will not see a dime from the fine.


    Well, except you will through services provided, like the roads/general infrastructure/defence/fire dept/police. The government isn't a profit making organisation you know...

    I'd hope that Sony is brought to account for their actions (or lack of) that allowed such a serious breach to happen at all.
  • -1 Hide
    kristoffe , May 6, 2011 2:32 PM
    I think it's more important to use government power to find out who did the hacking, and use funds to stop them, not SONY.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 6, 2011 3:32 PM
    @kristoffe

    good idea, waste the gov money to find a bunch of kids so Sony can sue them and then lock them up on the tax payers burden...... or fine Sony and make a lil cash for the gov

    here's some news for you, locking up hackers arent going stop them, it only going to agro them, Anon and such likes are child play compared to the real hacker community, and this would all be a non issue had Sony hired a decent legit security hacker to test and harden their defenses as well as implement decent security protocols, but then Sony would have to spend money to secure your data and heavens knows we cant have Sony making less money now
  • -2 Hide
    kristoffe , May 6, 2011 3:44 PM
    @AgrovateThem, you just read like someone who wants to do something illegal and not get in trouble for it. ;)  And SONY never needs to worry about my data. FTW. You don't dismiss the hacker by stating it will happen anyway. I think the world can survive with one less hacker group, whatever the level.

    So according to Agro, we shouldn't lock up criminals, it only aggrivates them, lolz. Sorry but I don't subscribe to the fear factor to allow people to do criminal activity. Cowards do.
  • -1 Hide
    hellwig , May 6, 2011 4:02 PM
    I have to think Sony's non-open mentality hurt them here, especially considering they were using the open Apache webserver. Maybe they should have been using Microsoft IIS. That might have been more to their liking. "A webserver anyone can use without paying someone else for it? That's absurd! Imagine if just anyone could use BluRay or MemoryStick without paying us, it would be MADNESS!"
  • 0 Hide
    captaincharisma , May 6, 2011 5:05 PM
    and lawsuits will keep coming . but i wonder how they will go now that Sony says they will offer 12 months of identity theft service?
  • 0 Hide
    g-thor , May 6, 2011 7:19 PM
    So is this AG planning on running for Governor or President? He found a great opportunity to get his name in the headlines. Outside of that, he really isn't doing anything useful at this time.
  • 0 Hide
    pirateboy , May 7, 2011 1:06 AM
    mmm good to hear that sony is receiving involuntary bumsex
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , May 7, 2011 4:32 PM
    @kristoffe

    nice, lets take what i wrote out of context shall we, the cost to the system of locking up these kids vs the pay off is not worth it, what good would locking up a bunch of kiddies, other then you enjoy paying for these kids meal and boarding through your taxes, and prison is a lottery, kids who go in can easily come out has hardened career criminals. These kids currently are just a marginal hassle to society, not even a threat.

    what kind of thinking goes along the lines that if there were no hackers Sony would not need to secure my data, nearly always the effects of hacker groups can be negated with enough planning, and i believe your overplaying the effects of hacking, there is a greater risk from phishers and Trojans (perpetrated by a different class of criminals) then from hackers

    i guess when we locked up all those thieves that theft suddenly stopped huh, reality check, if you want to solve the problem you better go to the root cause rather then the symptoms

    if Sony were to be found of criminal negligence would you ask that they be thrown into prison too? or would you prefer to be more selective with your definition of criminals
  • 1 Hide
    sseyler , May 8, 2011 1:41 AM
    AgrovateThem2@kristoffenice, lets take what i wrote out of context shall we, the cost to the system of locking up these kids vs the pay off is not worth it, what good would locking up a bunch of kiddies, other then you enjoy paying for these kids meal and boarding through your taxes, and prison is a lottery, kids who go in can easily come out has hardened career criminals. These kids currently are just a marginal hassle to society, not even a threat.what kind of thinking goes along the lines that if there were no hackers Sony would not need to secure my data, nearly always the effects of hacker groups can be negated with enough planning, and i believe your overplaying the effects of hacking, there is a greater risk from phishers and Trojans (perpetrated by a different class of criminals) then from hackersi guess when we locked up all those thieves that theft suddenly stopped huh, reality check, if you want to solve the problem you better go to the root cause rather then the symptomsif Sony were to be found of criminal negligence would you ask that they be thrown into prison too? or would you prefer to be more selective with your definition of criminals


    Reading both of your posts was a waste of time. Sony should be punished if it is found guilty for neglect.

    Want to hear something ironic? It's probably more pointless to argue with you, than pursuing this case, according to you line of reasoning.
Tom’s guide in the world
  • Germany
  • France
  • Italy
  • Ireland
  • UK
Follow Tom’s guide
Subscribe to our newsletter