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Apple Sued Over Infringing Upon File Viewing Patent

By - Source: WhitServe (PDF) | B 22 comments

Cupertino company has been using file viewing feature for several years.

Apple has, for the umpteenth time, found itself back in court over alleged patent infringement. WhitServe (PDF) is suing the firm for purportedly infringing upon a file viewing patent.

The firm argues that Apple's Quick Look function, which made its debut back in 2007 on Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard with the feature now integrated on all current Mac systems, breaches its U.S. Patent No. 7,921,139.

Entitled "System for sequentially opening and displaying files in a directory," the patent relates to software being able to open and close files in a near full-view mode. Apple's Quick Look enables users to view a folders' content without having to open the folder itself.

WhitServe, however, claims its software also allows users to view multiple files and edit them, with the software's licence being used by numerous unnamed organizations. 

The "harm to WhitServe resulting from the infringing acts of Apple is irreparable, continuing [and] not fully compensable by money damages." Subsequently, the firm is pursuing a "preliminary and permanent" injunction against Apple, accompanied by court fees and damages.

It should be noted that WhitServe's application for the patent was submitted in 2006, with the authorities granting it on April 5, 2011.


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Top Comments
  • 29 Hide
    bllue , November 4, 2012 3:45 AM
    Here's hoping Apple loses
  • 28 Hide
    guru_urug , November 4, 2012 3:26 AM
    This is what happens when a successful company starts thinking of itself as invincible...Apple had everything going for itself at the start of this year. Thought it was the authority in court. And had the power and money(undoubtedly) to sue and twist the patents in its favor. It generated a lot of hate from consumers, but apple kept that 'nothing can touch us' attitude. Its totally relying on its apple followers now cause this attitude has really pissed off a lot of people and not just geeks even common folk now recognize apple as a monopoly who aren't really as innovative and innocent as they call themselves. And they are just milking their same device in different sizes. Towards the end of 2012, I see many companies suing Apple, be it with their watch design or this now. Also with Apple maps fiasco I have seen people irritated with their strategy to just change screen sizes and adding new connectors. Are these cracks in invincible Apple....I think so. Never should a company think they are greater than the law and the masses.
  • 24 Hide
    fonzy , November 4, 2012 4:09 AM
    Might as well sue them before they find a reason to sue you.
Other Comments
  • 28 Hide
    guru_urug , November 4, 2012 3:26 AM
    This is what happens when a successful company starts thinking of itself as invincible...Apple had everything going for itself at the start of this year. Thought it was the authority in court. And had the power and money(undoubtedly) to sue and twist the patents in its favor. It generated a lot of hate from consumers, but apple kept that 'nothing can touch us' attitude. Its totally relying on its apple followers now cause this attitude has really pissed off a lot of people and not just geeks even common folk now recognize apple as a monopoly who aren't really as innovative and innocent as they call themselves. And they are just milking their same device in different sizes. Towards the end of 2012, I see many companies suing Apple, be it with their watch design or this now. Also with Apple maps fiasco I have seen people irritated with their strategy to just change screen sizes and adding new connectors. Are these cracks in invincible Apple....I think so. Never should a company think they are greater than the law and the masses.
  • -4 Hide
    panini , November 4, 2012 3:42 AM
    AFAIK Apple's Quick Look doesn't allow you to edit any files…
  • 29 Hide
    bllue , November 4, 2012 3:45 AM
    Here's hoping Apple loses
  • 24 Hide
    fonzy , November 4, 2012 4:09 AM
    Might as well sue them before they find a reason to sue you.
  • 10 Hide
    dark_knight33 , November 4, 2012 4:34 AM
    Here's hoping the apple falls from the tree under the weight of mass infringement lawsuits. I've noticed that Apple has been making a few comments about how the industry "needs to work out the 'patent situation'". Funny how that comes now after the messiah jobs declared legal nuclear war on everyone else, and is finally getting a taste of their own medicine.
  • -9 Hide
    reprotected , November 4, 2012 4:49 AM
    DevoteiconDammit, tom... quit feeding the trolls.

    It's actually the other way around. Tom is trolling the entire community by posting more Apple news, but the problem still persists: we need MORE Apple news. More hate! More soldiers! More business! It's propaganda and egotism like this that keeps business running and soldiers fighting. It's good that there are Apple haters out there, it makes people laugh at their hypocrisy.
  • 19 Hide
    pliskin1 , November 4, 2012 4:50 AM
    I'm so sick of these meaningless software patents.
  • 4 Hide
    abbadon_34 , November 4, 2012 4:53 AM
    go get em! teach em a lesson not to sure over bs!
  • 12 Hide
    bluekoala , November 4, 2012 5:18 AM
    Hehehe, this must be the first case of patent trolling I actually enjoy.
  • 5 Hide
    Anonymous , November 4, 2012 8:33 AM
    This is another reason why there are so many Apple Haters.

    Http://AppleHaters.blogspot.com

    @TheAppleHaters
  • 3 Hide
    cookoy , November 4, 2012 10:03 AM
    i believe the patent should not have been granted in this first place. the idea of "sequentially opening and displaying files in a directory" seems so common-sense and does not add to anything worth calling innovation.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , November 4, 2012 10:32 AM
    Seems like a case of failing to see the forest through the trees. Not a fan of Apple's arrogance but patent suits aren't doing us a lot of good no matter who they're against.
  • 2 Hide
    Anonymous , November 4, 2012 10:56 AM
    " believe the patent should not have been granted in this first place. the idea of "sequentially opening and displaying files in a directory" seems so common-sense and does not add to anything worth calling innovation." Agreed, but this fits most of Apple and MS patents, plus many of Apple and MS patents are based on previous "art".
  • 11 Hide
    sheepsnowadays , November 4, 2012 11:27 AM
    Its a good time in our sad world to be a lawyer.
  • 6 Hide
    Lewis57 , November 4, 2012 12:33 PM
    sheepsnowadaysIts a good time in our sad world to be a lawyer.


    This. It seems our technology news is nothing more than updates of who is suing who these days.
  • 0 Hide
    unimatrixzero , November 4, 2012 4:50 PM
    cookoyi believe the patent should not have been granted in this first place. the idea of "sequentially opening and displaying files in a directory" seems so common-sense and does not add to anything worth calling innovation.


    Really, the same could be said of Apple's patents for rectangles w/ rounded squares and even it's "bounce back" effect animation.
  • -2 Hide
    f-14 , November 4, 2012 6:40 PM
    clear cut case of violations, ban OS X and 10.5 until it is removed from the application.
    award fine on per application sold using said feature multiplied by 10.

    should send a clear message to others to purchase licenses
  • 0 Hide
    eklipz330 , November 4, 2012 10:15 PM
    pliskin1I'm so sick of these meaningless software patents.
    and yet, they are still allowed. if you have a software patent, you should feel bad.
  • -2 Hide
    chris claremont , November 4, 2012 11:32 PM
    like Bobby implied I'm dazzled that a student able to profit $4472 in a few weeks on the internet. have you read this link http://bit.ly/Yqz9w4
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