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Me Time with Kevin Hart and Mark Wahlberg is No. 1 on Netflix — and critics are roasting it

Kevin Hart as Sonny and Mark Wahlberg as Huck in Me Time
(Image credit: Netflix)

Me Time, the latest popular Netflix movie, is far from a critic's darling. Yes, while the Kevin Hart and Mark Wahlberg buddy comedy has held the No. 1 movie spot on Netflix since August 27 (one day after its release), the reviews are trying to shoo people away to something else.

Further, Me Time's popularity in the Netflix streaming numbers collides with another loud detractor: the audience ratings on Rotten Tomatoes (opens in new tab). So, while the review aggregator gives the film an 8% score for critics reviews, the audience score is only at 29%. 

Much like Echoes before it, Me Time looks like a movie that's made enemies left and right — while still collecting a strong viewership. So, let's dive into what you should know about Me Time, and if you should watch it on Netflix.

Me Time explained: What is Kevin Hart up to this time?

Me Time's premise is simple. Sonny (Kevin Hart) puts his family ahead of himself. His wife Maya (Regina Hall) knows he needs some — say it with me — me time. Then, Sonny gets a call from his old friend Huck (Mark Wahlberg), who is about to celebrate his birthday with a raucous bash. 

Sonny doesn't want to go, but since this movie would be too boring without him going, Maya forces the issue by taking the kids with her on a trip. Without Sonny. Then, Sonny tries to live a relaxing bit of time on his own, but that goes wrong quickly. 

Tired and stained, Sonny gives in and goes to meet up with Huck. And a road trip buddy comedy begins. They even go to a cut-rate version of Burning Man. Sonny keeps getting into trouble, but soon finds ways to impress Huck and his friends.

While it seems like Sonny is letting his inner maniac out, he keeps getting physically hurt — with reasons to go back home and stay there.

Me Time reviews: What critics think

As noted above, Me Time has an abysmal 8% Rotten Tomatoes critics score. The audience score, which I'll get to below, isn't much better. For Good Morning America (opens in new tab), Peter Travers wrote that Me Time is both "dim-witted and disposable" and its "hit-and-miss sight gags do not add up to the rowdy free-for-all that everyone clearly intended." 

Frank Scheck at The Hollywood Reporter writes "There’s nary an amusing or unpredictable moment in the film," and that while Hart and Wahlberg "have earned considerable good will from audiences over the course of their hugely successful careers. But that affection is likely to be tested with too many sub-par comic efforts such as this."

(L-R) Mark Wahlberg as Huck, Kevin Hart as Sonny, cross a street carrying a giant turtle, in Me Time

(Image credit: Saeed Adyani/Netflix)

Tomris Laffly at RogerEbert.com (opens in new tab) is slightly mixed in his review. He notes that "Search this sometimes clunky, sometimes over-plotted story and you will find worthwhile pursuits in it. Among them are a goodhearted portrait of an unconventional heterosexual marriage where the woman is the breadwinner, a celebration of friendship, and a few genuinely funny and unexpected moments that almost make up for the painfully clumsy special effects." 

And while he notes that "a few" of the movie's raunchier jokes "land and the rest of them don't," he ends his review noting Me Time "comes with enough rewards nonetheless thanks to an idiosyncratic group of lovable people who just need to get a little crazy in order to survive as their true selves."

Me Time audience reviews: What people are saying

Me Time could just be a Netflix movie that's more for fans than critics. But when it has a Rotten Tomatoes audience score of 29%? You start to wonder who it's actually for. 

Ravi G says he "Gave it 1.5 because I was able to finish watching it at least, otherwise a 1. Had potential but the story and dialog was poor," while Miles S (who also gave it a 1.5-star score) wrote "In a word: Unfunny. Poor acting. Poor story. I would only watch it if I was stoned out of my mind. But even then I might have a yawn. It's always entertaining to see Mark Wahlberg taking big swings though, and I can respect that. Save your time. There are actual quality movies out there. Movies that you'll actually laugh at."

Kevin Hart as Sonny and Regina Hall as Maya, at a bar, in Me Time

(Image credit: Saeed Adyani/Netflix)

Stella S wrote a very upset 0.5-star review that hammers on the plot details (which I won't spoil here). She says "I loved the characters, hate the whole "the husband (Kevin Hart) is in the wrong" vibe and dislike the lack of friendship development between Huck and Sonny. There are (sic) just sooo much more that was wrong to this film. There's just not enough time to write it all. C'mon you guys could have done better with character development and the dialogue."

Jeff P, though, disagrees, with a 4.5-star rating and review that simply says "This is funny as hell! If you like to laugh, you need to watch this one."

Me Time outlook: Should you watch tonight?

Me Time, as you've seen above, isn't trying to re-invent the comedic wheel. It looks best for those trying to relax and watch a so-gross-it's-funny juvenile movie that is prime for turning your brain off and giggling. 

In a way, we're almost confused how it inspired such frustration from the audience. It seems to be a simple outing, and this might be a case of mis-calibrated expectations. So make sure you know what you're getting into first.

Next: Check out our Lord of the Rings: The Rings of Power review to see why we think it's great — and divisive. Wrestling fans will need the WWE Clash at the Castle live stream details for this weekend's irregularly timed event.


Henry T. Casey
Senior Editor

Henry is a senior editor at Tom’s Guide covering streaming media, laptops and all things Apple, reviewing devices and services for the past seven years. Prior to joining Tom's Guide, he reviewed software and hardware for TechRadar Pro, and interviewed artists for Patek Philippe International Magazine. He's also covered the wild world of professional wrestling for Cageside Seats, interviewing athletes and other industry veterans.