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Xbox "720" "Durango" Rumored to Have No Disc Drive

By - Source: MCV | B 122 comments

But don't worry, it doesn't sound like the company is going download-only just yet.

Microsoft has not yet confirmed its Xbox 720, codename Durango, but that hasn't stopped the industry from talking about it, nor does it mean Microsoft isn't discussing the project behind closed doors. Apparently, one thing Redmond has been whispering about is the fact that the new console won't have a disk drive.

MCV claims to have been told that Microsoft has been telling partners that the newest addition to the Xbox line won't have an optical drive. Though a disk srive is out, it's though the console will offer compatibility "with some sort of interchangeable solid-state card storage," but it's not clear if this means MicroSD or something proprietary. Additionally, MCV reports that a 2013 launch date has been confirmed.

Microsoft's not one to comment on rumors or speculation, and MCV's sources say the briefings were issued under "the strictest NDA" they've ever encountered (so much for that?), so we're not expecting to hear anything substantial from Microsoft regarding this rumor. Indeed, in a statement to MCV, the company said that it's always "thinking about what is next for [its] platform" and ways to "defy the lifecycle convention" but declined to comment beyond that.

The Xbox 360 already enables users to download games, additional content, movies, and music so Microsoft isn't exactly unfamiliar with downloadable content. It's also worth noting that many laptop manufacturers already choosing to ditch the optical drive. The Xbox 360 was first unveiled in 2005, which was quite a few years ago. Assuming Microsoft intends for the Xbox 720 to last at least as long as the Xbox 360, it's not difficult to imagine the Xbox without an optical drive in 2019.

So, now the real question: What kind of 'card storage' would Microsoft go with?

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Top Comments
  • 23 Hide
    shqtth , March 10, 2012 5:25 PM
    If the console does not work with my existing xbox360 games (DVD), then I will not buy it. no way will I have 2 clunky consoles in my tv room.
  • 19 Hide
    icepick314 , March 10, 2012 5:45 PM
    it's not the speed of the internet that will hinder home video game console...

    it's the limited bandwidth...

    remember...many ISP have 250GB bandwidth limit for BOTH download AND upload...

    if you account for all the streaming media a person uses every month on top of all the regular internet traffic AND already available downloaded games, you're going to hit that limit even faster if video game consoles need CONSTANT online connections for their games...
  • 19 Hide
    Delengowski , March 10, 2012 5:40 PM
    Getting rid of discs is their way of getting rid of their problem of being re-selling games and buying used ones; this is exactly why they're doing this, especially considering the costs of SSDs
Other Comments
  • 23 Hide
    shqtth , March 10, 2012 5:25 PM
    If the console does not work with my existing xbox360 games (DVD), then I will not buy it. no way will I have 2 clunky consoles in my tv room.
  • 16 Hide
    Anonymous , March 10, 2012 5:30 PM
    No disc drive... that't retarded! How are you going to play movies (besides Netflix). I feel like they should upgrade to a Blue-ray drive. I'm sure future releases will take up way more space, some games on the PS3 are 20GB. Your going to need one massive hard drive to store all those games. Btw I'm not a PS3 fanboy, I own both consoles; play mostly on Xbox except for few PS3 only releases. My PS3 is used mostly for 3D Blue-ray movies.

    They should add and SSD or have a HDD but allow for your own upgrades. The feature on the Xbox to save an entire game on the hard drive is amazing. Saving some games (not all) at your discretion with a SSD would dramatically reduce load times. A SSD will also improve overall system performance.
  • 13 Hide
    omega21xx , March 10, 2012 5:34 PM
    I feel like we are going back to the atari/NES days of cartridges. lol Of course this isn't the same, but moving away from optical discs back to a solid storage seems pointless. Especially when SSD's are expensive ($1/GB) and SD cards are much the same ($0.75-1/GB)
    making that a more expensive solution than discs. $100 for games? nah, I'm sure they are just going to use some sort of SSD for the system storage and move to download only.
  • -8 Hide
    amuffin , March 10, 2012 5:36 PM
    Cloud storage maybe?
  • -9 Hide
    kcorp2003 , March 10, 2012 5:37 PM
    This is great! Running games from the Disc gives devs a hard time managing what goes into the buffer with compression techniques. I remember John Carmack touching this issue with DVDs about its limited transfer of data a time from disc.
  • 19 Hide
    Delengowski , March 10, 2012 5:40 PM
    Getting rid of discs is their way of getting rid of their problem of being re-selling games and buying used ones; this is exactly why they're doing this, especially considering the costs of SSDs
  • 2 Hide
    tbq , March 10, 2012 5:40 PM
    I don't have a fast internet connection, so I see no advantage of paying $70 for a game that I'll have to wait 2-3 days to download. If they used something like a triple layer HD-DVD for a disc, they would have the capacity of a bluray without having to pay royalties to Sony and without a huge number of drives on the market that can read the discs to copy or pirate them.
  • -7 Hide
    Anonymous , March 10, 2012 5:41 PM
    makes sense with the rumor of no used games. if they put everything on ssd drives and encrypted it based on your gamertag than you have a diskless console. honestly i only use the disk drive for the games. since i have a blu-ray player that has WAAAY better audio support than DD 5.1
  • -8 Hide
    frombehind , March 10, 2012 5:43 PM
    Cloud storage? definatelly. I absolutely approve of solutions like steam - online, and on-demand content delivery is definatelly the way of the future.

    As for the disk drive (or lack thereof) in the console itself is understandable. Will it support blue ray disks, and older 360 games? More likely then not. Wait, what?!

    It seems that no one here remembers that the XB360 had a little known USB attachment - the HD-DVD drive. It worked great, and mine still works ^^ although they dont make those disks anymore.

    If that thing has USB ports.... (and it will) you would just plug in your USB optical drive (dvd, blueray, whatever) to it, and do what you need to do :D 
  • 19 Hide
    icepick314 , March 10, 2012 5:45 PM
    it's not the speed of the internet that will hinder home video game console...

    it's the limited bandwidth...

    remember...many ISP have 250GB bandwidth limit for BOTH download AND upload...

    if you account for all the streaming media a person uses every month on top of all the regular internet traffic AND already available downloaded games, you're going to hit that limit even faster if video game consoles need CONSTANT online connections for their games...
  • 11 Hide
    blubbey , March 10, 2012 5:53 PM
    Why not a Blu-ray drive? They'll be very cheap when it'll be released and be many times bigger than the DVD's they have now (up to 100GB with BD-XL or something compared to the ~8GB's of the DVD's).
  • -8 Hide
    technogiant , March 10, 2012 5:54 PM
    Sounds good, a "steam" like account system so you can re-download from the cloud as you require. An on board 60GB SSD for os and game install and the option to back the games up to an optional large capacity HDD via usb 3.0.
    This is almost exactly how I use my PC steam account....works a treat for me.
  • 12 Hide
    omega21xx , March 10, 2012 5:54 PM
    Bring games below $50 ($40-50 new release) and they wouldn't have a "problem" with used games. $60 for a new release is just too much.
  • -8 Hide
    AznCracker , March 10, 2012 5:56 PM
    no disk "srive"? COOl!
  • 2 Hide
    d8v1d , March 10, 2012 5:57 PM
    I don't think cloud would work for large games. Imagine every millions of XBOX user, accessing that game on their cloud. Your going to need one heck of a server. And not everyone can afford good internet. You can have cloud for other reasons, but the games should still be put on a Disc or saved onto the Hard drive.
  • -1 Hide
    d8v1d , March 10, 2012 6:05 PM
    No disc drive... that't retarded! How are you going to play movies (besides Netflix). I feel like they should upgrade to a Blue-ray drive. I'm sure future releases will take up way more space, some games on the PS3 are 20GB. Your going to need one massive hard drive to store all those games. Btw I'm not a PS3 fanboy, I own both consoles; play mostly on Xbox except for few PS3 only releases. My PS3 is used mostly for 3D Blue-ray movies.

    They should add and SSD or have a HDD but allow for your own upgrades. The feature on the Xbox to save an entire game on the hard drive is amazing. Saving some games (not all) at your discretion with a SSD would dramatically reduce load times. A SSD will also improve overall system performance. Saving games on your HDD should be and Option, a games on DISCs and DISC Drive should be required.
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