Windows Phone 7 Unlock Tool Discontinued

Recent reports indicate that the Windows Phone 7 unlock tool has been discontinued just five days after its release.

Called ChevronWP7, the software mimicked the $99/year developer account by allowing users to sideload applications outside Microsoft’s official marketplace. The tool was free to download and use, and was never meant to promote piracy, but rather to promote homebrew development. However critics didn't agree, with one even protesting that ChevronWP7 provided "one of the planks for the bridge to piracy."

But now the debate is over. After a meeting with Microsoft's Windows Phone 7 Director of Developer Experience Brandon Watson, the three-man ChevronWP7 team has decided to pull the plug.

"Through this discussion, we established a mutual understanding of our intent to enable homebrew opportunities and to open the Windows Phone 7 platform for broader access to developers and users," the team said. "To pursue these goals with Microsoft’s support, Brandon Watson has agreed to engage in further discussions with us about officially facilitating homebrew development on WP7. To fast-track discussions, we are discontinuing the unlocking tool effective immediately."

Following the announcement, the team revealed a Windows Phone 7 custom ringtone manager, proving that homebrew developers and Microsoft can indeed exist together in harmony. The team has even released the source code to guide hopeful WP7 homebrew developers.

With the ChevronWP7 chapter now closed, it wouldn't be surprising to see the next unlock/jailbreak tool appearing any day now.

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  • JasonAkkerman
    Wait... so I can't just develop software for Windows Mobile for free any more? That's the main reason I have stuck with Windows Mobile for so long. Developing for these phones is easy, especially with .NET mobile framework.

    Now I need a $99 development license? So long WinMo, Hello Android.
    12
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  • JasonAkkerman
    Wait... so I can't just develop software for Windows Mobile for free any more? That's the main reason I have stuck with Windows Mobile for so long. Developing for these phones is easy, especially with .NET mobile framework.

    Now I need a $99 development license? So long WinMo, Hello Android.
    12
  • Anonymous
    Jason, if $99 is going to sway you, then I doubt you were hanging on to any WinMo phone.
    5
  • JasonAkkerman
    My last 3 phones were WinMo. HTC 8125 (Cingular rebrand), HTC 8525, and now the Tilt 2. I even have a Dell Axim X5. I have developed a number of home-brew apps ranging from Poker blind counters, birthday reminder apps, grocery lists apps, and more. I also developed a maintenance application for UTMB Galveston that ran on a Symbol device with a bar code scanner running Win CE that interfaced to a SQL Server backend.

    $99 isn't the point. It could be $20, 10, 5 and I would still be upset that I have been working with a product for years and now all of a sudden they want to charge me for development.
    4