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RIM Unveils BlackBerry 7 OS for Summer 2011

By - Source: RIM | B 10 comments

BlackBerry 7 will arrive on the Bold 9900 and 9930 smartphones this summer.

Monday in a heap of press releases (see below), Research in Motion revealed the upcoming BlackBerry 7 operating system which will come packed on the BlackBerry Bold 9900 and 9930 smartphones slated to hit the market this summer.

According to RIM, BlackBerry 7 will bring a generous load of new features in the coming months including HTML5 support and a new JIT (just in time) JavaScript compiler to the web browser. BlackBerry 7's browser will also take advantage of the phones' Liquid Graphics touch screen for faster rendering and seamless panning and zooming.

RIM also revealed that BlackBerry 7 will provide means for users to keep personal and corporate content separate on the device thanks to the integration of BlackBery Balance. This means users can check their personal email, access Twitter and Facebook, play games, interact with multimedia and install other non-corporate apps "while satisfying the very real need for corporate data to be highly secure and manageable."

"BlackBerry Balance works in conjunction with BlackBerry Enterprise Server 5.0.3, which provides a number of unique IT policy controls such as wiping only corporate data from the handset or blocking work related content and apps from being copied or forwarded to personal contacts," the company added.

In addition to BlackBerry Balance, the new OS will also offer voice-activated search and the full version of Docs to Go with all the "premium" features enabled right out-of-the-box. This mobile office suite contains a native PDF viewer and apps for creating/modifying Word, Excel and PowerPoint files directly on the smartphone.

As for the phones playing host to the new OS, the Bold 9900 and 9930 will be based on a platform featuring a 1.2 GHz processor, a Liquid Graphics touch screen, and support for high-speed 4G/HSPA+ wide area wireless networks. The phones will also include a magnetometer, Wikitude, support for 720p HD video recording and playback, and a 10.5-mm form factor. The actual list of specs is located below.

  • 115 x 66 x 10.5 mm, approximately 130 g
  • 2.8-inch capacitive touch screen display – VGA (64 0x 480), 287 dpi resolution
  • Ultra-easy QWERTY keyboard, optical trackpad
  • 1.2 GHz Processor, 768 MB RAM
  • 8 GB on-board memory, plus microSD slot supporting up to 32 GB cards
  • NFC technology
  • 5.0 MP camera, supports 720p HD video recording
  • Orientation Sensor (Accelerometer), Digital Compass (Magnetometer), Proximity Sensor
  • Built-in GPS / aGPS
  • Dual-Band Wi-Fi - 802.11 b/g/n at 2.4 GHz and 802.11 a/n at 5 GHz
  • Bluetooth 2.1+EDR support
  • Wireless Network support - 9900: Tri-Band HSPA+, Quad-Band GSM/EDGE; 9930: Dual-Band CDMA/EV-DO Rev. A, Dual-Band HSPA+, Quad-Band GSM/EDGE
  • 1230 mAh removable, rechargeable battery
  • BlackBerry 7 OS

Here are additional announcements made by RIM on Monday:

Discuss
Display all 10 comments.
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  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 2, 2011 7:40 PM
    Sounds like 2006 all over again, so won't break RIMs fall.
    RIM is down for the count within 18months.
  • -1 Hide
    JerseyFirefighter , May 2, 2011 7:48 PM
    irrelevant, next topic : )
  • 0 Hide
    hellwig , May 2, 2011 7:51 PM
    Quote:
    RIM also revealed that BlackBerry 7 will provide means for users to keep personal and corporate content separate on the device thanks to the integration of BlackBery Balance. This means users can check their personal email, access Twitter and Facebook, play games, interact with multimedia and install other non-corporate apps "while satisfying the very real need for corporate data to be highly secure and manageable."

    I'm sorry, but if your employer is paying for the phone, you have no cause check personal email, or access Twitter or Facebook from your phone and expect any kind of privacy (if you want privacy, don't use your employers hardware/internet connection). And playing games, even if you're in marketing, you don't need to play solitaire for business purposes.

    Clearly Blackberry is trying to cater to the average smartphone user, and by that, I mean Joe Sixpack and Susie Homemaker, who vastly outnumber the corporate users these days. At the same time, RIM is trying not to abandon their coprorate users, but Joe and Susie have no need for document editing and Exchange synchronization, encryption, VPN, etc...

    Blackberry is trying to do too much with one phone. If they could afford it, they need to branch their business, create a BlackBerry Home unit that makes fun phones, and a BlackBerry business unit that creates capable work phones. It would be like Dell. You can buy a fancy XPS system, a Laptop that lets you replace the case for different styles, a boring business-class line, maybe a high-powered workstation. Point is, there's no one-phone-fits-all scenario (unless you're an Apple user). You can use a single OS, but you need to market the phones differently. Trying to sell one phone that does "everything" (but nothing exceptionally well) does not work. Apple doesn't advertise the iPhone as a business phone (they mention it can edit documents and check email, but they don't mention businesses). Continually marketing each Blackberry as a business phone that is also fun is failing. Advertise a fun phone AND a business phone, but don't make them the same phone. Change colors, cases, whatever, make them different somehow.

    p.s. I didn't bring up Android because Google doesn't make the phones. It's up to Motorolla, HTC, Samsung, LG, etc... (and to some extent, the network provider) to decide what features actually get used and how to advertise them.
  • -1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 2, 2011 9:07 PM
    The reason RIM keeps marketing their phones as "business" phones is because it's the only leg they have left to stand on. What else could they market it as? A smart phone? A fun phone? A web phone? Android/iOS already crush Blackberry beyond recognition in these realms, RIM would look foolish trying to pretend that Blackberry even remotely competes against these. So all thats left is that somehow "business" phones fit into their own category. The simple truth is all that separates a business phone from any other phone was getting your company email on it. RIM was first to accept email as the dominant communications platform 10 years ago, but failed to do anything since. Now any phone can handle corporate email, leaving little reason to use devices as outdated as what RIM produces. What RIM failed to realize was how web-centric the world would become, and that simple black & white text would not suffice, but rather richly encoded emails loaded with content would.
  • -1 Hide
    memadmax , May 2, 2011 9:11 PM
    They still make blackberries??????
  • 1 Hide
    sykozis , May 2, 2011 11:05 PM
    So, exactly what does Android or iOS do that Blackberry smartphones can't???? Aside from tracking every place you go....
  • 0 Hide
    sandmanwn , May 2, 2011 11:45 PM
    Touchscreen and full keyboard, sweeet. I really like the fact that I can remote wipe my phone if I lose it as well.

    Oh wait, it doesn't have a million meaningless apps available, too bad... (sarcasm)
  • 0 Hide
    jednx01 , May 3, 2011 3:37 AM
    BlackBerries are kind of cool, but I've always viewed them as business tools. Most of the non-business I know are either sticking with iphones and androids...
  • 0 Hide
    enforcer22 , May 3, 2011 8:20 AM
    lolrimThe reason RIM keeps marketing their phones as "business" phones is because it's the only leg they have left to stand on.


    Couldn't have anything to do with the fact its the market they have always gone for and still do? no that cant be it right?

    sykozisSo, exactly what does Android or iOS do that Blackberry smartphones can't???? Aside from tracking every place you go....


    Look really stupid?

    memadmaxThey still make blackberries??????


    Thats like saying "they still make cars?" retard.

    Anyways on topic.. it looks dumb like android. Go back to the old UI IMO just make it higher res :)  and keep the awesome button screen or I'm pretty sure ill switch. Maybe but it would be really disappointing.

  • 0 Hide
    killerb255 , May 3, 2011 2:22 PM
    RIM...just license Exchange ActiveSync already. Why do we need Blackberry Enterprise Servers anymore?
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