Best Free VPN Services

Product Use case Rating
Windscribe Free VPN 4.5
Hotspot Shield Free VPN 4
Speedify Free VPN 4
Avira Phantom VPN Free 3.5
ProtonVPN Free 3.5
Hide.me Free VPN 3
Opera Browser VPN 3
TunnelBear Free VPN 2.5
SurfEasy Free VPN 2

You know you need to be as private as possible online, but you don't want to pay for a premium virtual private network service to encrypt the data traffic to and from your computer. Perhaps you want to watch a little overseas television, or torrent a few files anonymously. What's a frugal web surfer to do?

Based on our in-depth testing, our top pick is Windscribe, which gives you 10GB of free monthly data and whose connections were not noticeably slower than those made without a VPN.

Our runner-up is Hotspot Shield, which offers 500MB free per day, amounting to roughly 15GB per month. Like Windscribe, it didn't slow down our connections much. But Hotspot Shield admits that it partners with advertising networks and collects some user data. It also shows ads in the Android app, although the company says it no longer injects ads into websites displayed in a desktop web browser.

It's important to note that a completely free VPN service often comes with a hidden price. If it isn't getting money from you, then it's getting funds from someone else — sometimes by selling your browsing history, borrowing your bandwidth or injecting ads into the sites you visit.

That's why we generally recommend using the limited free tiers — let's call them freemium plans — offered by paid VPN service providers. Each has limits on how much data you can use, how speedy your connection will be or the number of VPN servers you can connect, but at least you'll know the service has legitimate ways of making money.

Free VPN News and Updates

— TunnelBear now supports Siri Shortcuts on iOS 12.

— ProtonVPN has added servers in Ireland and Norway, bringing the total number of countries served by the company to 25. Unfortunately, free users are still limited to servers in Japan, the Netherlands or the U.S.

— Speedify has updated its client software to version 7.0, which includes support for iOS 12.

— Windscribe has added support for custom OpenVPN configurations in its Windows and Mac client software.

Windscribe is among our top picks for paid VPN services, so it's natural that its generous free tier would shine as well. Among the regular free services, Windscribe ranked first in connection time, download speeds and upload speeds. It works so well that you might not notice any network lag.

The basic monthly allowance is only 2GB, but if you register with an email address, that jumps to 10GB. If you run out of data before the end of the month, you can always switch over to the even more generous Hotspot Shield.For even more free data, you can let Windscribe use your computer to mine cryptocurrency. That feature seems a bit creepy, but it's entirely optional and you can adjust the amount of power drawn.

Windscribe is based in the Toronto suburbs and is theoretically out of reach of U.S. law enforcement. Unlike some other Canadian VPN services, it hasn't yet been bought by a U.S. corporation.

MORE: Windscribe Free VPN Review

The free tier gives you the Windows, Mac, iOS, Android and Amazon Fire TV/Firestick client software (and the beta Linux software, should you wish to try it); the Chrome, Firefox and Opera Windscribe browser extensions to block ads and trackers; a separate firewall built in to the Windows and macOS clients; and the ability to connect to VPN servers in 11 countries, mostly in Europe and North America.

Paid users get unlimited data per month and the abilities to connect to any of Windscribe's 600 servers worldwide, including the Windflix feature to (try to) watch U.S. or U.K. Netflix streams, and to manually connect routers, Windows Phones, Linux boxes and torrent clients.

Hotspot Shield is even more charitable with its free plan than Windscribe is, giving you 500MB per day (about 15GB per month), and it's right behind Windscribe in speed and connectivity. Its user interface is one of the best we've seen, attractively presenting exactly what you need, and nothing more, right up front

The downsides to the free plan are that you'll see more ads, at least on the Android app, your choice of connections will be limited to Hotspot Shield's U.S. servers and you won't be able to get around geographic restrictions on Netflix, Hulu or BBC iPlayer. We were also a bit annoyed that the desktop software tries to hide the free plan when you launch it for the first time.

MORE: Hotspot Shield Free VPN Review

Hotspot Shield is up front that it collects "anonymous, aggregate" usage data, partly in order to "place generic ads" (their words, not ours). As the parent company is based in the U.S., it can't turn away the feds if they come a-knockin', although a 2017 transparency report says the company had never given law enforcement anything.

If none of these factors bothers you, Hotspot Shield makes a great complement to Windscribe, as using both services will get you up to 25GB of free VPN data per month.

With only 5GB of monthly data allowed, Speedify's free tier is not as useful as Windscribe or Hotspot Shield, but we're giving it extra credit because it's so darn fast.

If two or more independent internet connections are available, such as via Wi-Fi and cellular data, Speedify uses proprietary software to merge them to drastically boost internet speed. Even if you're linked via Ethernet and Wi-Fi to the same home router, there's no speed drop. We've never seen anything like it.

MORE: Speedify Free VPN Review

Speedify's drawbacks are that you can't connect manually (it's software-based), the cellular-data usage will cut into your carrier's monthly limit, and it's based in the U.S. and subject to search warrants. The free services is limited to one device, although you could just try to create new accounts for extra devices. But even free users can connect to any of the 1,000 or so VPN servers in 40-odd countries.

Overall, Speedify's free tier is just a teaser for the service's reasonably priced ($9 monthly or $50 yearly) paid plan. But it's a pretty effective teaser.

Avira Phantom VPN limits its free tier to only 1GB of data per month, and that's only if you register with a valid email address; anonymous users get 500MB. But this service is easy to use and reasonably fast, making it perfect for checking email while you're in an airport waiting for a flight.

MORE: Avira Phantom VPN Free Review

In addition to the drawback of a usage cap, free users won't get tech support, but they do get access to all of Phantom VPN's 82 servers in 24 countries and its client software: Windows, Mac, iOS and Android, plus a Chrome browser extension.

You'll also be able to use it on unlimited devices (not that there's much to share) and watch streaming video from other countries (though you won't be able to watch for long before the data cap is hit). Privacy fanatics will like that Avira is based in Germany, where Google Street View can't even take photos of people's houses.

ProtonVPN is a sister company to the ProtonMail encrypted-email service. You get unlimited data, but at speeds greatly reduced from the (rather expensive) paid plans.

Downloads took four times as long as they did without the VPN switched on, but even then, ProtonVPN was far from the worst among the nine free services we tested. You'll also be limited to VPN connections in only three countries, as opposed to the paid complement of 25, and you won't have access to ProtonVPN's "Secure Core" of super-hardened servers.

MORE: ProtonVPN Free Review

But you do get to connect to ProtonVPN servers manually for Linux, BlackBerry, routers and, um, iOS, for which there's no client app yet. The client user interface for Windows, Mac and Android is dark and ominous, but surprisingly user-friendly. And you can't get farther away from U.S. search warrants than a service based in Switzerland.

We really wanted to like Hide.me's free tier, as it lets you connect almost any operating system to Hide.me's VPN servers, doesn't throttle your speed, offers tech support and gives you a one-stop "privacy check" to analyze your connection.

MORE: Hide.me Free VPN Review

But for a company that bills itself as "the world's fastest VPN," Hide.me was kind of mediocre, with our download speeds dropping to a third of the non-VPN baseline. Free users are limited to 2GB of monthly data and can connect to servers in only three countries; either of those limitations would be more acceptable if the network speeds were faster.

Like ProtonVPN, the VPN service built in to the Opera web browser gives you an unlimited amount of free data per month. But its network download and upload speeds were awful (download speeds were 3 percent of the baseline speed), and it's not even a real VPN; it's just a browser-specific encrypted proxy service. (The OperaVPN mobile apps no longer work.)

MORE: Opera Free VPN Review

The only upsides to the Opera browser VPN are that data usage is unlimited, the client software is very easy to use and it, surprisingly, streamed Netflix content from each of its three servers locations without a hint of blocking. It's potentially useful to video streamers, travelers and café sitters who've run out of other free options — as long as they keep all their activity within the Opera browser window.

TunnelBear has a terrific user interface, but the service's network speeds are slow and unreliable and the basic free monthly allowance is only 500MB. You can boost that to 1.5GB per month if you just tweet about the company once, however.

Free users can connect to any VPN server in 20 countries, and all but iOS users can disguise their VPN traffic to look like regular data.

MORE: TunnelBear Free VPN Review

But TunnelBear's network latency was the worst among the nine services we tested, and the service's connection time was the second worst. Upload speeds were good, but the download speed was one-quarter of the baseline, and the connection dropped out three times during our tests.

We can barely recommend TunnelBear's free tier — but only for those who've already used up their monthly allowances with other freemium services.

Toronto-based SurfEasy provides the back-end servers for the Opera browser VPN, but we were still surprised that this full-fledged VPN service's network speeds were almost as bad as Opera's. Downloads took 10 times as long as before the VPN was switched on, and uploads took three times as long.

MORE: SurfEasy Free VPN Review

The free service starts at only 500MB per month, but you can lift that by 250MB if you register with the service and by 500MB for each friend you get to sign up. Free users are limited to connecting to servers in only 16 countries.

The low monthly allowance might ordinarily be enough for departure-gate email checking, but SurfEasy's connections were so slow that we can't recommend even the free service.

VPN Gate is an experimental project set up by the University of Tsukuba in Japan as an absolutely free, unlimited service that locates and connects you to VPN servers around the world.

Unfortunately, most of those servers are in Japan or South Korea, which means that connection delays are long and speeds can be slowed by any network hop along the way. The U.S. servers we connected to were excruciatingly slow; our speed test simply gave up a few times. We can't recommend VPN Gate to you unless you happen to live in or near Japan.

Nevertheless, VPN Gate is worth keeping an eye on. It uses the SoftEther open-source VPN client software, which supports multiple protocols and which we found fairly easy to set up. If the VPN Gate project adds faster servers in North America, it might end up delivering the ultimate goal: fast, free, unlimited VPN service for everyone.

How We Tested VPNs

To assess free VPN services, we gave them a thorough test drive from a suburban New York office and home. (We tested a 10th option, the experimental VPN Gate project, from a midtown Manhattan office, but that service's speeds were so poor we can't recommend it.)

Free VPN Performance Results


Connect timePing time (change from baseline; less is better)Download speed (change from baseline; more is better)Upload speed (change from baseline; more is better)
Speedify* 2.4 seconds23.2 ms (-17%)74.2 Mbps (+176%)32.8 Mbps (+507%)
Windscribe1.7 seconds31 ms (+122%)126.7 Mbps (-25%)32.4 Mbps (-5%)
Hotspot Shield3.2 seconds29.5 ms (+64%)111.8 Mbps (-35%)29.3 Mbps (-13%)
Avira Phantom VPN7.2 seconds18.6 ms (+24%)78.2 Mbps (-56%)28.3 Mbps (-20%)
Hide.me9.5 seconds48.8 ms (+205%)56.1 Mbps (-68%)23.5 Mbps (-27%)
ProtonVPN8.2 seconds102 ms (+363%)47.4 Mbps (-73%)22.0 Mbps (-37%)
TunnelBear8.8 seconds151.8 ms (+849%)38.8 Mbps (-76%)27.0 Mbps (-15%)
SurfEasy4.7 seconds41.4 ms (+176%)17.0 Mbps (-90%)10.0 Mbps (-64%)
Opera4.3 seconds32.6 ms (+151%)5.9 Mbps (-97%)2.8 Mbps (-92%)

*Speedify uses a proprietary network booster that requires two separate internet connections. Our testing used LTE and Wi-Fi on a phone.

We tried to use the web as we normally would: watching movies, reading email and news, playing games, and listening to music. We discovered that not only can you use a decent VPN for free, but that a lot separates the best from the worst.

For the formal testing, we used an HP EliteBook X360 1020 G2 notebook, an Asus ZenPad S8 tablet (for Avira Phantom VPN) and a Samsung Galaxy Note 8 phone (for Speedify). Wi-Fi and Ethernet connections were provided by a 200-Mbps cable broadband line. Each time we connected to a VPN service, we recorded how long it took to get online and noted how many times the service disconnected us.

We measured how much each service affected data flow using Ookla's Speedtest.net online bandwidth meter, which yields latency (network delay), download speeds and upload speeds. Each speed test was performed five times per service, then averaged.

Because home-ISP network speeds can vary, a baseline reading without a VPN connection was taken before each round of tests. The raw numbers were converted to percentage changes from the baseline so that the VPN services could be compared on an equal basis.

A word of warning: Because these tests were conducted from a single location over the course of a few days, they will not provide a complete picture of a VPN service's performance.

Who Are Free VPNs Best For?

Even the best of these services are good for only occasional use, such as when traveling or in a caf&eaigu;. They simply don't provide enough data usage or speed for 24/7 home VPN connections. If you want to encrypt all your home internet traffic, all the time, you should pay for your VPN service.

If a VPN service is based in the United States, it will be subject to search warrants presented by U.S. law-enforcement agencies. All VPN services log user connections, no matter what the service claims.

Many of the services we review here are based in Canada, Switzerland or Germany, which have stronger privacy laws. But two of the Canadian services, SurfEasy and TunnelBear, were recently bought by U.S. companies and have to honor U.S. warrants and subpoenas under a new U.S. law.

How VPNs Work

VPN services encrypt your data while it's in transit, creating a virtual tunnel through the internet that separates your data packets from the bazillions around them until they reach the VPN's exit nodes many miles away from where you are.

Not only is the data encrypted, as it would be during a normal secure web session, but the routing information about the sender and intended recipient is hidden as well.

Today, the most popular VPN protocols are OpenVPN and various implementations of Internet Protocol Security (IPsec), which include IPsec by itself or in combination with Layer 2 Tunneling Protocol (L2TP) or Internet Key Exchange versions 1 and 2 (IKEv1 and IKEv2).

MORE: The Best VPN Services and Apps of 2018

Some VPN protocols, including OpenVPN, use the Secure Sockets Layer/Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) protocols, which are also the standards to encrypt non-VPN connections between your web browser and secure websites (those that begin with HTTPS).

A VPN's scrambling and unscrambling of your data can sometimes slow internet traffic to a crawl. The best VPN service providers have fast servers connected to huge data pipes to minimize this performance decline. They also have thousands of servers located in scores of countries, ranging from Albania to Zimbabwe.

Credit: Shutterstock

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  • michellehsmith
    Hmmmm, just downloaded Windscribe and the Windflix server is listed as a paid feature.
  • Ben Harley
    I wouldn't recommend any free providers since all of them are always leaking your IPs and have bad servers. I bought one last month from best vpn services. All the vpns which are listed there are paid ones and are actually good. I have tried and tested 2 of them and to date they work just fine.
  • androbourne
    I personally only used paid VPNs for my devices. However, when I was searching for a VPN to use on a firestick. I ran past Express VPN. It was actually one of the better free VPNs I have ever used.

    Good things about it is no logging which is really hard to find in free VPNs. However it's been awhile so not sure if they are free anymore. (maybe only free for Android now).
  • The Paladin
    I second Express VPN and can use it on anything, pc, mac, android, they even have a router bios if you want to do that.
  • maxell.segura
    Have to go with OpenVPN on this one.
  • androbourne
    Anonymous said:
    Hey, I tried paid vpn's before and it's quite good but I have to try a free one. Good thing I saw this vpn(vpn free) I can stream and browse anonymously without any limit. I just guess you should try it too.


    Opera Browser has a built in free VPN you can use that is pretty decent. However, I believe it has logging. They say "its not monitored and dumped often" however not sure how true that is.

    Epic Browser is really good for this. Has a built in VPN/Proxy and automatically protects you from trackers etc... This is the one I recommended over other browsers with built in VPNs.
  • jahnon
    I heard that entirely free VPNs sell your data for third-party companies and is unsafe. I use Surfshark 7 days free trial now and plan to test other VPNs which provide a free trial option. I'll pay a subscription charge for a VPN when I'll figure out which one best fits my needs.
  • elitech
    Anonymous said:
    I heard that entirely free VPNs sell your data for third-party companies and is unsafe. I use Surfshark 7 days free trial now and plan to test other VPNs which provide a free trial option. I'll pay a subscription charge for a VPN when I'll figure out which one best fits my needs.


    That is somewhat true. However, I would not generalize with the statement that ALL entirely free VPNs sell your data, I do not have the time nor ability to check them all (and I doubt anybody else does).

    Keep in mind though - as with anything else in life, someone has to pay the piper. And if the service is free, usually the user is the product. With all that being said, I am sure there are also pay-for VPNs that have..."interesting" practices with user data and logging.