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The best cheap gaming headsets of 2020 (Under $60)

(Image credit: HyperX/ Sades/ Beexcellent/ Kotion Each)

Need a good gaming headset for hearing enemies coming in Call of Duty: Modern Warfare or Gears 5 but don't have hundreds of dollars shell out? Fear not, there are plenty of great affordable options out there, and we've tested out the best cheap gaming headsets to help you play your best on a budget.

We tested 12 gaming headsets under $60 and ranked them based on sound performance, mic quality, comfort and design to help you figure out which are worth your money. 

Here are the best cheap gaming headsets you can buy now. Need something higher-end? Be sure to also check out our roundup of the best gaming headsets overall.

(Image credit: HyperX)

1. HyperX Cloud Stinger

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 50mm | Frequency Response: 18 Hz - 23 kHz | Wireless: No

Very comfortable design
Handy controls, affordable price
Sound gets blown out at higher ranges

The Stinger features a very sturdy design, soft padding and large ear cups that keep the set truly around your ears rather than pressed on them. It is the most comfortable set of the bunch. The on-ear audio control is an intuitive slider that's easy to use while worn, and the wire ends in a splitter for headphone and mic usage without needing a USB pass-through.Unfortunately, the audio was really blown out at higher ranges, and a bit painful at times to experience, which may be the fault of the onboard volume controls pushing things out too far at max volume.

Read our full HyperX Cloud Stinger review.

(Image credit: SteelSeries)

2. SteelSeries Arctis 1

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 40mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

Good sound
Comfortable to wear
Removable mic
Imperfect fit
Subpar mic quality

The SteelSeries Arctis 1 delivers nearly everything that's great about the rest of SteelSeries' excellent Arctis line at just $50. This headset packs a simplified version of SteelSeries' signaturely sleek headset design, soft fabric earcups and the same rich drivers you'll find in higher-end Arctis models. And with its removable mic and handy 3.5mm connection, it makes the perfect gaming companion whether you're on the road with your Switch or at home with your PC. While it doesn't offer the same world-class, auto-adjusting comfort as its pricier siblings, the Arctis 1 offers some of the best performance you can find at this price range.

Read our full SteelSeries Arctis 1 review.

(Image credit: Astro)

3. Astro A10

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 40mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

Slick, durable design
Impressive audio performance
Clear microphone
Affordable
A little snug

The Astro A10 is proof that Astro can deliver more than just expensive high-end headsets. The A10's slick design takes some cues from its more premium siblings such as the A40 and A50, offering a surprising level of style and sturdiness for a peripheral that costs less than $60.

The headset's lightweight frame and soft memory foam ear cushions are ideal for long sessions, though its earcups can get a bit snug for folks with big ears. Most importantly, the A10 delivers great sound for the price, with crisp highs and meaty lows that make it easy to hear the competition coming.

Read our full Astro A10 review.

(Image credit: Sades)

4. Sades A60

Compatibility: PC, Mac | Drivers: 50mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

Unique design
Comfortable to wear
Loud and clear sound
USB-only
Onboard controls can be difficult to use

This set has a pretty striking design that glows in various places when plugged in, and has "Spellond" in the Harry Potter font printed on the side for some reason. Aesthetics aside, this set has stiff but breathable padding and is easy to wear despite its size and weight. Audio is impressively loud and clear, not muffled or blown out.The A60 only comes with a USB plug, so you'll have to run the wire to the USB port on a console. The on-wire audio controls are hard to use without looking at the symbols and feel cheap compared with the headset itself.

(Image credit: Razer)

5. Razer Kraken X

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 40mm | Frequency Response: 12 - 28 kHz | Wireless: No

Sleek design
Comfortable fit
Good in-game sound
Obnoxious mic
Subpar music performance
Surround sound not too different from stereo

The Razer Kraken X is a very solid $50 headset, packing good sound into one of the best-looking designs that Razer's produced yet. A far cry from the bulky chassis of previous Razer headsets, the Kraken X is sleek, subtle and lightweight, with leatherette ear cups that are a joy to wear for hours on end. The headset's 3.5mm connection works seamlessly with consoles and PCs, and offers well-balanced sound for competitive and immersive games alike. We wish the headset had better music performance and a removable mic, but this is a great overall gaming headset for the price.

Read our full Razer Kraken X review.

(Image credit: Roccat)

6. Roccat Renga Boost

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 50mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

Comfortable fit
Good gaming sound
Widespread compatibility
Imperfect ear cups
So-so music performance

The Roccat Renga Boost stands out from the sub-$60 crowd by offering a faux-leather self-adjusting headband that, combined with its cushy foam earcups, provides an immediately comfortable fit that stays cozy for hours. The Boost also offers solid sound quality for the price, delivering crisp treble and impressive clarity -- even if it is a bit lacking on bass. And with dual 3.5mm audio jacks, the Renga Boost plays equally nice with consoles and PCs.

(Image credit: PDP)

7. PDP LVL50 Wired Stereo Headset

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 50mm | Frequency Response: N/A | Wireless: No

Decent gaming sound
Inexpensive
Works with any system
Plain design
So-so fit
Subpar mic

The PDP LVL50 Wired Stereo Headset offers solid, no-frills gaming audio for an inviting $50 price tag. While it comes in distinct PlayStation and Xbox-branded variations, its 3.5mm cable makes it suitable for use with just about any platform or mobile device. The LVL50 is a solid value, but we didn't find its fit or mic quality to be up to par with other budget competitors.

Read our full PDP LVL50 Wired Stereo Headset review.

(Image credit: Corsair)

8. Corsair HS50

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 50mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

Comfortable fit
Decent game audio
Inexpensive
Disappointing music performance
Dated design
No defining features

The Corsair HS50 is a solid, no-frills headset, offering a cozy fit and decent game audio for the price. The headset's foam earcups stay comfortable during long play sessions, and swivel up and down to better adjust to your head.

The HS50's detachable microphone gets the job done for quick multiplayer sessions, and the headset's overall build quality is solid for a budget model. Our only knock against the HS50 is that it's incredibly plain, with a boring all-black design and no special extra features.

Read our full Corsair HS50 review.

(Image credit: Razer)

9. Razer Electra V2

Compatibility: PS4, Xbox one, Switch, mobile, PC | Drivers: 40mm | Frequency Response: 20 - 20 kHz | Wireless: No

The Razer Electra V2 is impressively well-built for a $60 headset, offering a sleek, sturdy and mostly comfortable design. This 3.5mm headset works well with just about any platform, and even offers virtual 7.1 surround sound. However, the Electra V2's sound quality just isn't up to snuff compared to headsets such as the HyperX Cloud Stinger and Astro A10.

Read our full Razer Electra V2 review.