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15 Tips and Tricks for Windows 8

15 Tips and Tricks for Windows 8
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Getting ready for the future, according to Microsoft

Sure, Windows 8's Start screen represents a whole new approach towards personal computing (at least for Windows users) but once you get on top of things, working your way through the interface should be a breeze.

We've been using Windows 8 for a while now, so allow us to share some helpful tips and tricks that will make your experience with the operatingsystem better. As always, feel free to leave suggestions in the comment area below.

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  • 0 Hide
    DjEaZy , October 26, 2012 2:33 PM
    ... and how this sensfully utilizes my 27'' display?
  • 6 Hide
    djscribbles , October 26, 2012 5:13 PM
    Running command prompt as administrator (pic 12) is using a tedious method.

    Hit Windows key, type cmd, press Ctrl+Shift+Enter.

    Just the same as Windows7.
  • 0 Hide
    jacobdrj , October 26, 2012 6:34 PM
    djscribblesRunning command prompt as administrator (pic 12) is using a tedious method.Hit Windows key, type cmd, press Ctrl+Shift+Enter.Just the same as Windows7.

    Did not know about this. Super cool. Does CTRL SHIFT ENTER work to run anything as admin?
  • 0 Hide
    krowbar , October 26, 2012 7:07 PM
    Quote:
    Running command prompt as administrator (pic 12) is using a tedious method.Hit Windows key, type cmd, press Ctrl+Shift+Enter.Just the same as Windows7.

    You can still do that in Windows 8, or you can just right click where the start button used to be and select command prompt (Admin), both really easy.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 26, 2012 8:15 PM
    Another (easier) way to run the command prompt as an admin. When on the desktop, hover your mouse over the lower left corner, right click, and choose "command prompt (run as administrator)".
  • 0 Hide
    TheCapulet , October 26, 2012 8:27 PM
    Good tip on the shutdown icon. Hadn't bothered me enough yet to find a workaround.

    Here's a decent icon set for it. Attach the icon to the shortcut 'after' you place the icon wherever it's going to stay permanently.
    http://www.softicons.com/free-icons/system-icons/windows-8-metro-invert-icons-by-dakirby309/power-shut-down-icon
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , October 26, 2012 8:41 PM
    Shutdown even easier with Alt+F4 (actually work as close function for almost everything)
  • 0 Hide
    nukemaster , October 26, 2012 9:24 PM
    krowbarYou can still do that in Windows 8, or you can just right click where the start button used to be and select command prompt (Admin), both really easy.

    yes :) 
  • 0 Hide
    nukemaster , October 26, 2012 9:26 PM
    jacobdrjDid not know about this. Super cool. Does CTRL SHIFT ENTER work to run anything as admin?

    the YES was for this. damn lack of edit.
  • 3 Hide
    merikafyeah , October 26, 2012 9:46 PM
    These are among the most useful articles I've encountered about Windows 8:
    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/Windows8ProductivityWhoMovedMyCheeseOhThereItIs.aspx
    http://www.hanselman.com/blog/PinningUsefulAndObscureStuffToTheWindows8StartMenu.aspx
    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/santhoshonline/archive/2012/08/05/windows8-desktop-keyboard-shortcuts.aspx

    "Real" power users should already know about this among other things and wouldn't be caught dead complaining about something as trivial as "lack of start menu".
  • 0 Hide
    pjmelect , October 27, 2012 1:00 AM
    Here is another tip for using Windows 8, install ClassicShell and ribbon disabler. This makes the desktop much more useable, enabling you to ignore the Metro crap.
  • 0 Hide
    Prodromaki , October 27, 2012 1:03 AM
    Why would you need a shutdown shortcut at all? Just set the power off button to perform a shutdown and you are good to go(I am pretty sure, that this is it's default attitude, on a desktop pc anyway).
  • 0 Hide
    jp7189 , October 27, 2012 2:58 AM
    Windows Key + X combos are all you need.

    For example Windows Key + X, A - pow instance Admin Command Prompt.
  • 0 Hide
    bystander , October 27, 2012 5:46 AM
    Another method for shutdown. Hit the power button on your computer. Most motherboard Bios default the ability to shutdown Windows when you hit the power button. If it doesn't by default, go into the Bios and change the corresponding setting.
  • 0 Hide
    stoogie , October 27, 2012 10:32 AM
    Guys don't buy this crap, let it die out. Then Microsoft will learn its mistake.
  • 0 Hide
    Burodsx , October 28, 2012 12:37 AM
    Quote:
    Fast forward several years later, such reservations about the new interface no longer hold weight.


    Maybe so, but I still think it sucks.
  • 1 Hide
    floydian101 , October 28, 2012 3:43 AM
    I'm getting tired of reading these articles that try to make it sound like the traditional windows experience no longer exists. The traditional desktop is fully intact. They make it sound like you have to use the computer in Metro view all the time. The truth is they replaced the start menu with a start screen, which actually works a little better for finding programs (including normal programs like excel, photoshop, etc.), but it doesn't really seem useful for much else yet. Once I got all of my programs pinned to the taskbar, I didn't have to look at the metro screen at all, except for when I initially log in. It's a slightly refined Win 7 experience in the desktop mode.
  • 0 Hide
    tser , October 29, 2012 10:20 AM
    Windows 8 + l+ and you are back at windows 7 look :)  and visa-versa!
  • 0 Hide
    tser , October 29, 2012 10:21 AM
    ctrl plus esc that is
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , November 3, 2012 1:20 AM
    Classic shell fixed all the issues i had with 8.
    BTW my system will still lock and ask for the password even with the lock screen disabled.
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