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BlackBerry World: Six Ways RIM Messed Up Its Own Party

BlackBerry World: Six Ways RIM Messed Up Its Own Party
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Research in Motion is a company under siege. It pretty much owned the smartphone market five years ago and was the first, last and only choice for business users. Then came Apple and Google, and the party was over.

The most recent ComScore report on the smartphone market shows Android has surpassed BlackBerry, and Apple is inching up. RIM faces the real risk of going from first to third place in the market.

The shame of it all is that BlackBerry phones are hardly shoddy. On the business side of the market, it's still the standard in secure, manageable smartphones, and the company has managed to grab a nice share of the consumer market. But it's seen as dated and worst of all, decidedly unhip.

There were some serious shortcomings: the lack of a decent touch screen phone like the Android/iPhone design (referred to as "chocolate bar" designs) definitely hurt. Its attempt to compete with the iPhone, the Storm, was terrible. While Android and iOS had good to great Web browsing experiences, the BlackBerry browser was terrible.

RIM fixed the browser problem in BlackBerry OS 6.0 with a slick new browser that was a major improvement over the old one. The BlackBerry Torch, introduced with OS 6.0, had a much nicer touch screen.

There was hope the company would get its act together. Coming out of the BlackBerry World conference in Orlando, Florida earlier this month, it appears RIM hasn't gotten the hint. Where it had opportunity, it dropped the ball. More than once.

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  • 0 Hide
    wawa sxm , May 24, 2011 10:29 PM
    Its sad to see rim go down like that...the 9930 woulda been a huge hit two years ago, even last year woulda still been nice....bb messenger is great, i know countless of people that got a bb just for that service, thats another lost advantage...i waited for the playbook, it had a lot of potential but now i feel like rim is just patching stuff left and right..maybe if they called it the blackslate....i am going to buy the 9930 but next year if rim doesnt shape up and give me a reason to stick with them then its going to be an android phone with a keyboard..by then rim will be nothin more than a watered down android device :( ....sorry rim but nuthin good has come since the bold, maybe you should do like apple and focuse on one phone and make it the best it can be!
  • 1 Hide
    mayankleoboy1 , May 25, 2011 1:35 AM
    a pal bought the BB torch.
    awful phone, but good touchcreen
  • -2 Hide
    Anonymous , May 25, 2011 2:05 AM
    RIM will be on top once again. Have you tried their PlayBook? It's the best.

    Typed from my PlayBook.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , May 25, 2011 4:22 PM
    RIM was riding on a wave of nostalgic owners who deserted the disarray of Nokia and the unbelievably incompetent ‘smart’ phone. As the smart phone starts to perform the job it was supposed to, make calls and send messages, nostalgic owners will start to dip their toes into the world of Android and Windows Phone. RIM was just an interim handset, a sticking plaster in a world of iPhone-induced insanity.

    I am afraid that I see no reason why the mobile landscape will differ from the computing landscape, these devices are in essence the same thing and thus are driven by the same factors.

    Hence, the mobile future will be Windows 1st, Google 2nd and Apple a distant but hip 3rd. RIM will die... but I will miss it,

    "Azz told you first"
  • 0 Hide
    jacobdrj , May 25, 2011 6:13 PM
    Cams0ftRIM was riding on a wave of nostalgic owners who deserted the disarray of Nokia and the unbelievably incompetent ‘smart’ phone. As the smart phone starts to perform the job it was supposed to, make calls and send messages, nostalgic owners will start to dip their toes into the world of Android and Windows Phone. RIM was just an interim handset, a sticking plaster in a world of iPhone-induced insanity.I am afraid that I see no reason why the mobile landscape will differ from the computing landscape, these devices are in essence the same thing and thus are driven by the same factors.Hence, the mobile future will be Windows 1st, Google 2nd and Apple a distant but hip 3rd. RIM will die... but I will miss it,"Azz told you first"


    This. Well said
  • -1 Hide
    mobileadmin , May 25, 2011 8:09 PM
    There is confusion on what Ubitexx will bring to the table. You will NOT be adding iOS / Android to BES, BESx. Ubitexx is a fully stand alone solution that RIM will make a central management GUI across all platforms to manage the users device so one could have a Playbook, BB, iPad etc and have one GUI to manage it all.

    Note that Ubitexx will NOT have any of the BES functionality as that is native to BB / BES. Ubitexx like every other MDM is limited by the API support of the device maker. Apple is the closest to RIM now with API support, Google, WebOS and Windows Phone 7 are very lacking in providing these controls (and surpirsingly have very little enterprise adoption).

    Window Phone 7 is dead. I find it amusing people think it will gain any traction. In 6 months they sold 1.6 million devices. That is an utter failure. At least RIM is still selling 12-14 million devices a quarter. Windows Phone 7 has no enterprise adoption and that is what drives sales. Consumers sales only get you so far and right now there is no reason to buy a Windows Phone 7 - none.

    RIM is at the end of their lifecycle with Blackberry java OS. Everyone knows this and they are building their future with QNX. I've used a Playbook since launch and while yes it is missing Apps and function the OS is hands down the best one out right now and considering the companies RIM bought the last year or so I find it amusing anyone is writing them off considering LTE (4G) is starting to ramp up and EVERY SINGLE smartphone will need to be replaced in the next 2-4 years.
  • -1 Hide
    hellwig , May 26, 2011 4:50 PM
    When I bought my T-Mobile G1 with 3G capability (in Februray, 2009), my wife's BlackBerry 8900 (the newest phone they made at the time, we got it a couple weeks after it was released), still only supported EDGE. This was a sign, to me, that BlackBerry was resting on it's laurels and not trying to advance itself. 3 months after the first Android phone was released (with 3G), blackberry was STILL releasing new phones with only EDGE support. Even if Android was basically non-existent, and the iPhone was still just a toy, BlackBerry should have been trying to keep up with modern technology and trends. Instead, they just kept releasing the same software and same phones (with slightly better graphics and a couple more MB of memory), but not really changing anything. When Apple and Google came out with OSes (and supporting phones) that were more capable (for the average consumer) and user-friendly, BlackBerry was left playing catchup.

    This happens to the leaders in most industries. Look at Microsoft's failure to innovate. They're so big and have been #1 for so long, they can hardly come up with anything new. It took them 7 years to get Vista out the door after XP, and it was such a fiasco upon it's release it set them farther back than had they not released it at all (Linux and OSX are growing in popularity). People are violently opposed to upgrading from Windows XP. I don't recall such aversion when XP came out after Windows ME (yes, XP is better than ME, but Vista/7 is better than XP). People just don't trust Microsoft anymore.

    BlackBerry was on top of the smartphone market for so long, they didn't even know what hit them when the iPhone and Android hit the market. Blackberry was left playing catchup, and you can't catchup if you continue to release products that are inferior to your competitors.
  • -1 Hide
    mareich , May 26, 2011 11:44 PM
    I bought a Storm 2 years ago because I wanted contacts and calendar info synchronized with my laptop. Unfortunately, RIM has no clue as to supporting OSX users. I spent 20 months banging my head against a wall trying to get my calendar to sync between the Storm and my laptop. I gave up last week and got an iPhone and all is well. RIM's OSX desktop manager was a complete disaster with a list of "known issues" that was longer than it's "known features." The issues were the Storm was a crappy device for which pulling the battery was the only solution for a wide variety of problems and RIM's user support (for a non-business user) was abysmal. I moved from Windows to OSX because I was sick and tired of battling over whether various problems were software or hardware related (with associated finger-pointing). With RIM, it was worse, because it was virtually impossible to get reliable responses to anything from the company. No surprise since the Storm was never "ready for prime-time" from the outset, IMHO. The potential for RIM to follow Palm into the sunset is no surprise to me.
  • 0 Hide
    dominicus , May 27, 2011 9:55 AM
    oh so sad.. anyone who knows the history of tech KNOWS that, if this situation follows normal form.. blackberry will have stumble after stumble , fail after fail, irrespective of any (however significant) advances.. once you go from #1 to #3, it's just IMPOSSIBLE to climb back up.. even Mr. Jobs wouldn't be able to do it.. hey remember his history with NeXT.
    If i may be prophetic for a moment, i would offer that within 18 months BB will be subject to a takeover bid, will be acquired for a fraction of the highest rate share value, and will be either dismantled , or set up as a brand name' marque, losing all in-house development.

    Gentlemen.. turn off your engines..the Device LeMans is OVER..
    We already know the winners, and now the losers

    Doccus Rockus Maximus
  • 0 Hide
    AndrewMD , May 28, 2011 2:42 PM
    As stated, RIM was a good company at one time but countless device failures and mis-management has cost this company. In the end it will be up for sale in the very near future, predicting a late summer to fall takeover bid. Actually Microsoft could well be the company to buy it out just to have the IPs to integrated into Exchange Server. They can also make more enterprise Windows mobile 7 devices running on blackberry styled devices.

  • 0 Hide
    mareich , May 28, 2011 4:15 PM
    Why does Tomsguide.com not prevent or delete the obvious spam in these comments?
  • 0 Hide
    dominicus , May 28, 2011 6:10 PM
    That was exactly what i was wondering.. i made the mistake of *subscribing* to replies so i've been getting notified every new bit of spam that's posted. :-(
    There needs to be a 'report this as spam' button somewhere...
  • 0 Hide
    mareich , May 28, 2011 6:16 PM
    I discovered there is, but it's not clearly labeled. The little yellow triangle with ! (across from the poster's name) is for reporting to moderators.
  • 0 Hide
    dominicus , May 28, 2011 11:28 PM
    Ah it's gone! ;-)
    I did actually mouse-over it but this
    ...../us/forum//user/modo.phpconfig=tomsguide.inc&cat=2&post=1657&numreponse=17979&page=...

    really doesn't give much idea for what it's for..
    Good on ya for finding it!!
  • 0 Hide
    mareich , May 29, 2011 2:48 AM
    Seems to work also! Who woulda thunk!?
  • 0 Hide
    Mousemonkey , June 4, 2011 9:23 AM
    Quote:
    Seems to work also! Who woulda thunk!?

    ;) 
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