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Sony Doesn't Yet Know if Credit Card Info is Safe

By - Source: PC World | B 34 comments

Sony’s PSN has been out since last Wednesday night, and the company Friday confirmed that the outage was a result of an ‘external intrusion’ and that it had actually switched PSN and Quriocity services off while it dealt with the issue.

Though Sony said on Thursday that it would be ‘a day or two’ before PSN was back, that deadline has long since passed and, at around noon today, the company admitted that it really can’t say when PSN will be back. However, it seems the 70 million PSN users may have more to be worried about than a lack of access to online gameplay.

PC World quotes Satoshi Fukuoka, a spokesman for Sony Computer Entertainment in Tokyo, as saying the company would inform users if it found that personal information or credit card numbers were compromised during the attack but whether or not they had been had yet to be determined.

Sony has yet to provide any official information on the breach; however, an SCEE source told PlayStation Universe that PSN suffered at the hands of a LOIC attack, which damaged the server, as well as a concentrated attack on the PlayStation servers holding account information. PSU's source says admin dev accounts were also breached and that Sony "[is] currently in the process of restoring backups to new servers with new admin dev accounts."

The most recent update on the status of PSN arrived at about 11:20 a.m. ET and reads as follows:

I know you are waiting for additional information on when PlayStation Network and Qriocity services will be online. Unfortunately, I don’t have an update or timeframe to share at this point in time.
As we previously noted, this is a time intensive process and we’re working to get them back online quickly. We’ll keep you updated with information as it becomes available. We once again thank you for your patience.
                                
-- Patrick Seybold, Senior Director of Corporate Communications and Social Media

Display 34 Comments.
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  • 1 Hide
    burnley14 , April 25, 2011 11:55 PM
    Yay for Xbox Live. You get what you pay for I guess.

    Or if these guys steal your credit card info, they get what you pay for :) 
  • 1 Hide
    memadmax , April 25, 2011 11:58 PM
    If LOIC was used then it probabley was Anom or an offshoot...
  • 5 Hide
    house70 , April 26, 2011 12:03 AM

    "Sony Doesn't Yet Know if Credit Card Info is Safe"

    That's just lame, SONY.
    Pathetic.
  • 1 Hide
    Anonymous , April 26, 2011 12:17 AM
    What the...

  • 5 Hide
    kinggraves , April 26, 2011 12:23 AM
    Of course the credit card info isn't safe, Sony has it.
  • 1 Hide
    slayer12bot , April 26, 2011 12:31 AM
    It is not my friends bank account got hacked after he received a message on psn about how they have his credit card information.
  • 2 Hide
    jednx01 , April 26, 2011 12:31 AM
    Wow this is really starting to be a big problem for sony. If they end up losing a bunch of credit card info, the customer backlash is going to be absolutely enormous...
  • 2 Hide
    otacon72 , April 26, 2011 1:04 AM
    slayer12botIt is not my friends bank account got hacked after he received a message on psn about how they have his credit card information.


    ...right.
  • 0 Hide
    mman74 , April 26, 2011 1:24 AM
    Right ... blame Sony for taking a strict line on a possible security threat?
    Didn't Xbox Live users get their accounts account hacked with credit card info and cerdits stolen also a few years back? Wouldn't you have wanted MS to have taken a strict line on security. It seems to me that Sony are taking no risks here and are to be commended.
  • 2 Hide
    okibrian , April 26, 2011 1:24 AM
    I have lived in Japan now for almost 20 years and I can tell you that Japan is FAR behind the US when it comes to credit card security. If you have been here (Japan) a while and seen how sales are processed, and what POS systems where in use, you would understand what I'm talking about. They have no clue of PCI here and really do not care too much about securing card data. They are of the mind that the card cleared at the merchant so everything must be OK. That's about it. Think about that when you give Sony your credit card data.
  • 1 Hide
    okibrian , April 26, 2011 1:34 AM
    Example: We have a local PC shop (again, here in Japan) we by parts from here and the POS system they have still runs Windows 95! When I asked them why they have not upgraded yet they said it was because the software they had would not run on any newer version of Windows. So they have not upgraded the OS or POS software in 16 years!!!! Again, well the credit card cleared at the merchant so it must be OK, right? NOT! This is one of many that operate like this here.
  • 1 Hide
    alextheblue , April 26, 2011 1:35 AM
    jednx01Wow this is really starting to be a big problem for sony. If they end up losing a bunch of credit card info, the customer backlash is going to be absolutely enormous...
    No joke, people will be wishing they had used pre-paid cards instead. I'd certainly be leery of leaving my CC info in PSN after that.
  • 1 Hide
    Darkk , April 26, 2011 1:58 AM
    I deleted the CC info off of PSN a couple of months ago. Hopefully they actually purged it instead of keeping it like some other companies do.

  • 0 Hide
    11796pcs , April 26, 2011 2:16 AM
    Wow, this is really bad, but it probably happens all the time and this just may be one of the larger security hacks. What I don't get is why they don't save the data on your actual console and when you buy stuff they process the transaction then immediately delete it. It should work right? Also why does this never happen to the credit card companies themselves? Are their networks so much more special or something- is it good luck?
  • 0 Hide
    jalek , April 26, 2011 3:19 AM
    I hope they didn't pay their "source" for the information, LOIC doesn't penetrate anything, it doesn't even scan, it just floods. The only "damage" is the DDoS.and traffic.

    Someone probably socialed their way in through an employee and ran amok.
    Recent layoffs couldn't possibly be related.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , April 26, 2011 3:24 AM
    didn't citi or master cad had a breach as well? I recalled some bank too.....its happens everywhere as long as they use computer to store the info...even your kid can "breach" your credit card while you are sleeping...lol
  • 2 Hide
    spectrewind , April 26, 2011 5:06 AM
    Having purchased the original 60GB version of the PS3 when it was $600... The OtherOS problem Sony created for itself seems to have become something far more serious. Everything else continues to work fine.

    I was using YellowDog Linux prior to the removal of OtherOS. I miss it, my HDMI cable, and a large desktop that worked great. I never hacked my machine.


    I think to myself repeatedly, that if Sony had done "the right thing" for people who purchased their product, this kind of thing might not be happening.


    This is my last Sony console... I have already recommended people I work with AVOID SONY (nurses, anesthesiologists, etc, that like to game, and they have the money to do it).

    I have had 6 different families in my neighborhood ask me to help them with putting a decent gaming console in their living room. People with money to spend...
    Three got a PC. Two got XBOX360. One got a WII.
    Nobody bought a PS3, after is showed what has been happening after the last year.


    SCEA:
    I hope someone from Sony (with a brain and decision making power reads this). You had SIX FAMILIES that would have bought a PS3 had I told them to. I made sure NONE of them did, and they are happy.

    Are you? NO? Really?

    ...Good!!

    I legally own my games. I do my best to make anyone I talk to NOT buy anything with Sony's name on it. I am the anti-customer you didn't want. Congratulations!
  • -1 Hide
    sdeleon515 , April 26, 2011 6:02 AM
    But you are missing the big point of this whole mess spectrewind, most people who pirated games for Xbox 360 got ban~hammered long~time back. Nintendo 3DS is threatening bricking for anyone using any other OS than the one that came to it. Fact is, homebrew wasn't an initial issue with Sony until pirating became huge and then they responded.

    Fact that the service issue with PSN has tons to do with some off~shoot crusade about "omgz we're defending our fellow hackers" is pretty moronic. I'd put my money on one likely scenario: had homebrewing been very minimal with pirating games, there probably wouldn't have been a peep from anyone.

    And plz don't give the fkn BS about "omgz sony is an evil evil company that controls its product". Hey pal unless you've been living under a rock I can change out Sony with Apple when it comes to a company managing its product. A Wii is as useless as a console and was a fad. Xbox 360 has, omgz, paying multi~player. Yea its a good console but I don't want to play for Xbox live, really why the fk do I want to?

    If this is the outcome of every time makes a little crusade about "we're defending hackers" then how about stopping the pirating of games. I have 4 friends with Nintendo DS's. All of them homebrewed it and have hundreds of pirated games. I may buy my sh*t but yea, 1 person out of 4 buying? I can see how that works and I'm pretty damn sure for every single homebrew that there was on the PS3 there was at least 1 person pirating or adding mods to just fkn cheat a fps shooter.
  • 0 Hide
    vfighter , April 26, 2011 6:26 AM
    I know Sony and Valve should have tested all of this before hand, but what if it is Steam conflicting with PSN? I mean look at the timing. That would be crazy stupid, but I wouldn't put it past Sony to let something like that happen then not admit the truth because it would cast them in such a dim light.
  • 0 Hide
    kashifme21 , April 26, 2011 9:00 AM
    Lol do we really expect them to admit. Think of the backlash if they admitted credit card details have been leaked.

    PS: Sony is terrible lol.
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