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Impossible Burger 2.0 Taste Test: Shockingly Good

LAS VEGAS — There’s nothing quite like taking a big bite of a juicy, medium-rare burger. And as I’m savoring every bite of my favorite restaurant’s flavor bomb of a burger (Emily in Brooklyn, in case you’re curious), I’m never thinking: “I’m contributing to the destruction of the environment?” As a former vegetarian, I know the effects that our societal reliance on beef has had on our health and our land. But I can’t go back to sad soy patties.

Could you tell the difference?

Could you tell the difference?

Border Grill's Impossible Burger is artfully messy, like all good burgers are.

Border Grill's Impossible Burger is artfully messy, like all good burgers are.

The Cost of Cutting Back

Impossible Burger 2.0 isn’t exactly cheap. Burgers made with the new recipe will be available in well-known restaurants nationwide by March, including Danny Bowien’s Mission Chinese Food in New York City, Michael Symon’s Ohio-based B Spot burger restaurants and Chris Cosentino’s Cockscomb in San Francisco.

At Hopdaddy in Scottsdale, Ariz., the Impossible Burger (using the original recipe) goes for $12.25. A classic burger made of Angus beef with the same basic toppings costs just $7.25. Eating responsibly has a high price tag.

But you’ll soon be able to buy Impossible Burger by the pound in grocery stores, so you won’t need to dine at high-end restaurants to try it. It doesn’t shrink when cooked, so you get more bang for your buck than buying traditional ground beef. And as Impossible Foods scales its production of Impossible Burger, the price will come down, Lipman said. For now, Impossible Foods is focused on convincing carnivores that faux meat can taste just as good without any of the guilt.

“For a meat-eater to like a veggie burger, you’re going to have to use some technology,” Lipman said.

Mission accomplished.