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Google Voice: Port Your Number & Keep Old One

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 11 comments

Changing numbers can be a real pain in the neck. No matter how many group texts, emails, or Facebook updates you issue, you can pretty much guarantee someone will try and contact you via your old phone number long after you’ve switched. Sometimes the hassle is enough to deter you from switching. Google addressed this issue in January by allowing Google Voice users to port their own number and use it instead of the Google Voice number they received when they signed up for the service.

While most people availing of this service were likely thrilled to have the option of returning to their much loved and well-known number, it presented a new issue for those who had slowly begun to adopt their Google Voice number as their main contact number. After 90 days, anyone contacting that number would no longer be able to reach them, as it would have been returned to Google.

Today, the Google Voice team is rectifying that issue. People changing their Google Voice number, porting their number to Google Voice, or utilizing Sprint/Google Voice integration can now keep their old number for a one-time fee of $20.

“Since many Google Voice users grow attached and become closely associated with their Google Voice numbers, we’re making it possible for users in any of the scenarios above to permanently keep the previous Google Voice number on their account,” writes Google engineer Eugene Goldfarb. “This means that calls made and text messages sent to your previous number will still reach you, however, your new primary Google Voice number will display on caller ID when you make calls or send text messages.”

Outgoing messages and calls will register as coming from your new number, but any replies or calls sent to your old number will still be received. To hold onto an old number, log in to Google Voice, go to Settings and hit the “make permanent” option next to the number that you want to hang on to. Easy!

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  • 8 Hide
    doive1231 , June 11, 2011 7:24 AM
    People wanting to contact me is the reason I change numbers.
  • 1 Hide
    onyx_64 , June 11, 2011 7:32 AM
    Is this really news? This has been there for a while now.
  • 1 Hide
    WR2 , June 11, 2011 12:46 PM
    A one time fee of $20 is a really good deal. I had expected some type of monthly charge for this.
    Like the monthly charge to NOT have a number listed in the white pages.
  • Display all 11 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    icepick314 , June 11, 2011 1:13 PM
    WR2Like the monthly charge to NOT have a number listed in the white pages.


    I don't know who your phone service provider is but most, if not all, phone service providers have option to have your number officially listed as an option for free...

    if that particular provider is making you pay NOT to have number listed, you need to go with another provider....even VOIP....
  • -6 Hide
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  • -5 Hide
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  • 0 Hide
    bit_user , June 12, 2011 9:06 AM
    I dunno. Your google voice account is linked to your regular google account. Do you really want them to be able to track who you call and when? How much info does google need to collect about you before it becomes too much?
  • 0 Hide
    Da_Man , June 12, 2011 12:27 PM
    yeah it sometime scare me, with all of things involved google,
    gmail, picasa, google search engine, google maps, android and now google voice, all of them all the best featured that's why most people use them, of course they have privacy policy, but still, government have power to access the information.

    bit_userI dunno. Your google voice account is linked to your regular google account. Do you really want them to be able to track who you call and when? How much info does google need to collect about you before it becomes too much?

  • 0 Hide
    bit_user , June 12, 2011 3:25 PM
    da_manof course they have privacy policy, but still, government have power to access the information.

    Not just governments, but also hackers and dishonest employees.

    Another thing... privacy policies can change however and whenever they like. Even if I'm satisfied with their current policy, they've still got my info whether I like tomorrow's policy or not. The same goes for laws, but we theoretically have some control over those.

    We need better regulations & privacy laws. What will it take for the public to see that?
  • 0 Hide
    DM0407 , June 12, 2011 7:00 PM
    Quote:
    I dunno. Your google voice account is linked to your regular google account. Do you really want them to be able to track who you call and when? How much info does google need to collect about you before it becomes too much?


    So the major phone carriers don't keep track of your call information? Or are they that much more secure and honest when compared to Google?
  • 0 Hide
    bit_user , June 12, 2011 8:40 PM
    DM0407So the major phone carriers don't keep track of your call information? Or are they that much more secure and honest when compared to Google?

    No, the issue is that the majority of phone carriers don't also have my web search history, my gmail history, my Android app data, my youtube watching & commenting history, all linked to my user account. And the same for most of the people I interact with.

    Again, how much is too much?
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