Sign in with
Sign up | Sign in

Air, Flash Finally Coming to Smartphones

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 19 comments

Monday Adobe said AIR and Flash Player 10.1 will hit various smartphone platforms this year.

Adobe announced Monday that both Flash Player 10.1 and Adobe AIR are coming to smartphones this year. Revealed at Mobile World Congress 2010 (which kicked off on Monday), the company said that Google's Android will be the first platform to receive Adobe AIR sometime this year.

The release of Adobe AIR could be significant. For developers, the mobile market should widen thanks to AIR's "single platform" environment. This will allow them to create applications across a broad field of devices rather than develop different versions of one application for different platforms.

Adobe also said that Google's Android platform will be the first to receive Adobe Flash 10.1, with versions for Blackberry, Symbian OS, Palm webOS, and Windows Mobile will follow. When released, mobile users may have access to Hulu and other video streaming sites that were previously not compatible in mobile browsers without Flash support.

"With the general availability expected in the first half of 2010, Flash Player 10.1 is the first consistent runtime release of the Open Screen Project enabling uncompromised Web browsing of expressive applications, content and high definition (HD) videos across screens including new tablet devices, smartphones, netbooks, smartbooks, desktops and other consumer electronics," the company said.

A beta of Flash Player 10.1 is already available to content providers and mobile developers worldwide. With many mobile broadband providers such Verizon and Sprint already offering pay-TV services, it will be interesting to see if those networks even allow AIR and Flash on their devices.

Still, with many websites wanting to move away from Flash, is Adobe's support a little too late?

Check out the first Flash supporting phone here.

Discuss
Ask a Category Expert

Create a new thread in the Streaming Video & TVs forum about this subject

Example: Notebook, Android, SSD hard drive

This thread is closed for comments
Top Comments
  • 14 Hide
    SchizoFrog , February 16, 2010 5:41 PM
    JohnnyLuckyI'm not sure why anyone would want to access video streaming sites on a tiny screen.


    I'm so bored of hearing these lame comments about the size of the screen for watching media. For the same reason that hand held consoles such as the Nintendo DS has been a success based on the long success of the Gameboy, obviously a 3" screen is big enough and people use it.
Other Comments
  • 8 Hide
    djcoolmasterx , February 16, 2010 4:37 PM
    Good heavens god forbid it taints the beloved iPhone!
  • 0 Hide
    keczapifrytki , February 16, 2010 4:57 PM
    Something I wanted to ask... When will Adobe and Apple play nice?
  • Display all 19 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    kajohn10 , February 16, 2010 5:14 PM
    This is goodness, push the technology to be compatible across multiple platforms, and people will use it...well I know I will! Being a Java addict, I am anxious to see how well this may take off, especially since I will never buy into the "Apple only apps for Apple products" BS attitude.
  • -9 Hide
    JohnnyLucky , February 16, 2010 5:32 PM
    I'm not sure why anyone would want to access video streaming sites on a tiny screen.
  • 14 Hide
    SchizoFrog , February 16, 2010 5:41 PM
    JohnnyLuckyI'm not sure why anyone would want to access video streaming sites on a tiny screen.


    I'm so bored of hearing these lame comments about the size of the screen for watching media. For the same reason that hand held consoles such as the Nintendo DS has been a success based on the long success of the Gameboy, obviously a 3" screen is big enough and people use it.
  • 0 Hide
    maestintaolius , February 16, 2010 5:45 PM
    Awesome, I can't wait to play Robot Unicorn Attack on my Tour!
  • 6 Hide
    Steven Bancroft , February 16, 2010 5:50 PM
    JohnnyLuckyI'm not sure why anyone would want to access video streaming sites on a tiny screen.


    The same reason we load full movies, music videos, and games... mobility!

    If you don't like it don't use it, but for us who have mobile devices we love options and proliferation of web content to handhelds.
  • 0 Hide
    darkknight22 , February 16, 2010 5:58 PM
    mobile fatality....open systems win.
  • 0 Hide
    thething2 , February 16, 2010 6:03 PM
    Let's see if they optimize the mobile version to not be such a resource hog.
  • 0 Hide
    dbrooks08 , February 16, 2010 6:11 PM
    I really hope we have this thing all sorted out between Flash and HTML5. I dont know which platform to consider when buying a web device. People say Adobe is going downhill then they release Air, which in my mind COULD be a game changer.
  • 0 Hide
    SchizoFrog , February 16, 2010 6:53 PM
    dbrooks08I really hope we have this thing all sorted out between Flash and HTML5. I dont know which platform to consider when buying a web device. People say Adobe is going downhill then they release Air, which in my mind COULD be a game changer.


    As far as I know AIR is a flash based media player, not actually a codec or web based code as flash or HTML5 is. From the articles I have read so far it seems that HTML5 has the backing of all the major players of web based media such as YouTube, Vimeo... and it seems to be going to same way as the transistion from analog to digital for TV signals. The website will run dual versions side by side for some time and then eventually kill off the flash versions as HTML5 becomes more popular. Although this is likely to take several years so I would think that flash is the way to go for current device upgrades.
  • 0 Hide
    longerlife , February 16, 2010 7:31 PM
    Actually it is nothing like the analogue to digital transition. There are no plans to transition the services you mention to HTML5 yet. The html5 videos are part of a beta experiment (for UTube at least) and is being used to assess the viability of using it. At present html5 is not widely supported enough to even consider replacing Flash, and with announcements like this they may never have to.
  • 0 Hide
    SchizoFrog , February 16, 2010 8:32 PM
    longerlifeActually it is nothing like the analogue to digital transition. There are no plans to transition the services you mention to HTML5 yet. The html5 videos are part of a beta experiment (for UTube at least) and is being used to assess the viability of using it. At present html5 is not widely supported enough to even consider replacing Flash, and with announcements like this they may never have to.


    Maybe you should read more?

    Tom's Hardware
    http://www.tomsguide.com/us/HTML5-YouTube-Vimeo-Adobe-Flash,news-5623.html

    Gizmodo
    http://gizmodo.com/5454115/first-youtube-now-vimeo-how-html5-could-finally-kill-flash-video

    Vimeo
    http://vimeo.com/blog:268
  • 0 Hide
    thedreadfather , February 16, 2010 9:23 PM
    Support for the Zune HD, please.
  • 2 Hide
    Abydosone , February 16, 2010 9:58 PM
    longerlifeActually it is nothing like the analogue to digital transition. There are no plans to transition the services you mention to HTML5 yet. The html5 videos are part of a beta experiment (for UTube at least) and is being used to assess the viability of using it. At present html5 is not widely supported enough to even consider replacing Flash, and with announcements like this they may never have to.


    AIR is a platform, not a media player. It allows a flash based program (usually Adobe Flex) to run on the desktop and act like a Java program.

    It will be a long time before HTML5 becomes a W3C recommendation, and years before it can compete with Flash. All HTML5 has now is built in support for video and the canvas tag (very crude 2d animation, not even timeline based). And even when HTML5 becomes a standard in 2016, Internet Explorer wont have it implemented until 2020 with the way that team works... LOL
  • 0 Hide
    dbrooks08 , February 16, 2010 10:28 PM
    longerlifeActually it is nothing like the analogue to digital transition. There are no plans to transition the services you mention to HTML5 yet. The html5 videos are part of a beta experiment (for UTube at least) and is being used to assess the viability of using it. At present html5 is not widely supported enough to even consider replacing Flash, and with announcements like this they may never have to.


    Okay so im thinking about the current tablet coming in the future. I want the iPad because shes very sexy but since flash is used at a lot of the sites i currently use it seems i cant go that route :( 
    What mobile device in tablet form should I look into?
  • 0 Hide
    SchizoFrog , February 16, 2010 11:19 PM
    AbydosoneAIR is a platform, not a media player. It allows a flash based program (usually Adobe Flex) to run on the desktop and act like a Java program.It will be a long time before HTML5 becomes a W3C recommendation, and years before it can compete with Flash. All HTML5 has now is built in support for video and the canvas tag (very crude 2d animation, not even timeline based). And even when HTML5 becomes a standard in 2016, Internet Explorer wont have it implemented until 2020 with the way that team works... LOL


    Thats what I was trying to get at about AIR but wasn't sure how to say it. But I do disagree with your comments about the adcvancement and adoption of HTML5 as more and more devices require full scaling HD content to run on as little resources as possible, the current flash base just isn't good enough or practical as you have to down load and install individual pieces of software to get it to run. For mobile products that are designed for the masses manufacturers and developers surely want to establish a non installed standard as soon as possible.
  • 0 Hide
    anamaniac , February 17, 2010 7:05 AM
    How about anything more than Flash 6 on my PSPgo?
  • 0 Hide
    crom , February 17, 2010 4:49 PM
    AIR can also access external APIs, like Open GL or Direct 3d, much like games can. Which gives it the benefit of running 3d applications in a cross-platform way. Also, with HTML5 vs Flash, I've yet to see HTML5 stream video in the same efficient manner that Flash does. Granted it could be that the technology is still a bit too new, but it looks more like embedding a WMV/MOV file all over again.
Tom’s guide in the world
  • Germany
  • France
  • Italy
  • Ireland
  • UK
Follow Tom’s guide
Subscribe to our newsletter
  • add to twitter
  • add to facebook
  • ajouter un flux RSS