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Google Delays Decision for Google Fiber Pilot City

By - Source: Tom's Guide US | B 18 comments

It's been a while since we last heard about Google's Google Fiber project. The company's aim to build and test ultra high-speed broadband networks in a small number of trial locations across the United States was first announced way back in February. At the time, Google called for communities interested in being a pilot town to submit their applications before March 26. The search giant said that once this date had passed, it would evaluate the responses and announce its target communities "later in the year."

Now, we don't need to tell you that the end of the year is creeping up on us at what appears to be an alarmingly fast rate. With just over two weeks left of 2010, we had yet to heard anything about whom Google had chosen for the pilot. Would it be Topeka, Kansas, which changed its name to Google, Kansas, in honor of the internet giant? Or how about Duluth, Minnesota? The mayor of that particular city went for an ice-cold swim in an effort to get Google's attention. Surely they had earned themselves some piping hot fiber action?

Unfortunately it seems we'll have to wait a little longer to find out which community Google has chosen. The company said in a blog post published earlier this week that it's pushing the announcement into early 2011.

"We had planned to announce our selected community or communities by the end of this year, but the level of interest was incredible—nearly 1,100 communities across the country responded to our announcement—and exceeded our expectations," wrote Milo Medin, Vice President of Access Services at Google. "While we’re moving ahead full steam on this project, we’re not quite ready to make that announcement," he continued.

Medin goes on to clarify that while they need more time to make their decision, the 'selection process' has not been re-opened. So no last ditch effort polar bear swims, okay Don Ness?

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  • 2 Hide
    Gin Fushicho , December 17, 2010 12:46 AM
    I say if that many people wanted it, just start making it a full blown ISP business.
  • 0 Hide
    keyanf , December 17, 2010 12:51 AM
    Daytona Beach/Port Orange nao!
  • 3 Hide
    NuclearShadow , December 17, 2010 1:07 AM
    Gin FushichoI say if that many people wanted it, just start making it a full blown ISP business.


    I'm sure that is likely the end game plan however fiber optics isn't cheap.
    One of the main reasons why no one has made the switch yet despite the costs
    is the fact that the main broadband providers tend to be monopolies in the areas
    No competition means no reason to improve service even more so when its
    as costly as going to fiber optics. The game requires a new player to
    make such a thing happen and Google does have the resources behind it
    to do such.
  • Display all 18 comments.
  • 0 Hide
    truehighroller , December 17, 2010 2:05 AM
    I think they will roll out more now then they were going to in the beginning.
  • -3 Hide
    keczapifrytki , December 17, 2010 2:31 AM
    Google. if you come to any place in Chicago area I AM MOVING!!!
  • 1 Hide
    JOSHSKORN , December 17, 2010 7:04 AM
    Wherever Google Fiber goes, I go. Byebye, Verizon!
  • -1 Hide
    secolliyn , December 17, 2010 9:30 AM
    Have a look here
    http://www.pressdemocrat.com/article/20101213/BUSINESS/12131005?p=all&tc=pgall

    Local company who we currently have DSL Though was already selected by Google for part of that test (not saying we are getting it but a guy can dream right)
    i just find it really cool that Google is going with such a relative Small guy for this
  • 1 Hide
    Tedders , December 17, 2010 2:44 PM
    __-_-_-__lol... so ancient...in my country it's very unusual for a city NOT to have an optic fiber network and several ISP's providing 1gbps up and down.

    And just how small is your country? The USA is a very large and diverse topographical area so implementing this sort of thing is no easy task.
  • 1 Hide
    mikem_90 , December 17, 2010 3:28 PM
    TeddersAnd just how small is your country? The USA is a very large and diverse topographical area so implementing this sort of thing is no easy task.


    Its actually not too hard, a little expensive to redo a lot of the last mile wiring, but the Oligopoly we have in the US strikes down any community trying to do this on their own. They fire off major lawsuits, campaigns to mess with the politicians who even try to usurp the larger players.

    I think they should roll out fiber and just have both copper and fiber to the last mile. That way the people with alarm circuits and devices needing power from the phone company to work can be fine. If they're going to be dropping fiber anyway, might as well drop that too just in case. That was the only real downside I heard about. It shouldn't cost too much if the copper is 'dark' unless needed.
  • 1 Hide
    mikem_90 , December 17, 2010 3:48 PM
    TeddersAnd just how small is your country? The USA is a very large and diverse topographical area so implementing this sort of thing is no easy task.


    Also: keep in mind that the US already has MAJOR backbones of fiber already laid. The emails and messages you see are already moving along fiber for 95% of their journey. There's so much fiber laid that there is a lot of fiber that is not being used, its dark.

    Fiber is a funny thing, you can push a lot of data across it. Each year they keep finding new ways to increase the bandwidth between single fiber links. So the only weak point is in switching, but we're even there breaking records too.

    No, the real cost is in putting new switchboxes and running fiber to each house along with a fiber drop point, then running it into the house. Large diverse topographical areas are already solved.

    The big problem is they wouldn't be able to charge companies through the nose for their tiddly T1/T3 links they used to make money on back in the 90s. Much of their business is being the slow dumb creature that has money shoveled up to it without it doing a damn thing.
  • 0 Hide
    restatement3dofted , December 17, 2010 7:50 PM
    I'd love it if this made it to Seattle. Too bad it probably never will, given the existing franchise agreements between the city and Comcast/Qwest that kept Verizon from being able to bring FiOS to the city...
  • 0 Hide
    f-14 , December 17, 2010 7:52 PM
    mikem_90Also: keep in mind that the US already has MAJOR backbones of fiber already laid. The emails and messages you see are already moving along fiber for 95% of their journey. There's so much fiber laid that there is a lot of fiber that is not being used, its dark. Sprint is the main company behind the fiber, they ran it for this long distance service in the late 80's & 90's their affilliates that use their networks such as TDS and the likes are just now starting to get enough money to lay their own fiber lines to replace ma' bells old 1940'sand 50's copper wires that are degrading or damaged pretty bad from water or corrosion or it was in the frost zone. AT&T gambled on microwave and wireless networks and have built their system based on that type of service and have sunk billions into making that system and still are. every company has it's own exclusive areas they aquired from the break up of ma' bell and they gaurd their own territories like vicious animals doing everything they can to keep competing telecommunications companies out which is why cable companies got around that because their service was for coaxial cable television service, internet was a side benefit they had to develope into when dish satellites got some traction in the market.
    another major factor in lack of progress is local state and federal regulations for permits, lisc.'ing and enviornmental impact studies are notoriously required every where making this incredibly more complicated and expensive and alot of cities make it a requirement to be invasive underground as they don't want unsightly poles and wires hanging every where. that further increased costs by 3x's but the price is finally starting to come down on that as more and more companies are adopting invasive directional boring rather then the ditchwitch saw trenchers or backhoes of the 90's and 80's that cut into the ground 4-8 feet down while avoiding power, sewer, water, telephone, cable, and gas lines. dating as far back as the 1700's for some of those systems. my dads company has some dandy pictures of the sewer and water systems 10-250 feet underground of chicago and nyc.
    so that's a big part of the fight/cost, and now you understand why AT&T choose to go microwave/wireless. telecoms are just now getting to the point of connecting users to the sub systems they got around to setting up the back bone back in the 80's and 90's and are developing the areas most inexpensive/profitable first where there's tons of people and then working their way out as the $$$ allows to the more spread out populaces not along the main lines. so hopefully you understand why there's all the high prices. once it's done those telecoms will be moving into video-telecommunications systems where you make a call and see the other person your talking to at the other end but in full motion better then webcam tech like the phone system on the movie 5th element.
    Quote:
    No, the real cost is in putting new switchboxes and running fiber to each house along with a fiber drop point, then running it into the house. Large diverse topographical areas are already solved.The big problem is they wouldn't be able to charge companies through the nose for their tiddly T1/T3 links they used to make money on back in the 90s. Much of their business is being the slow dumb creature that has money shoveled up to it without it doing a damn thing.
    [/quote]
    Quote:

    i think this guy is pretty close to the truth with some major misunderstandings in how all these companies interact with each other as well as local state and federal regulations and the existing sub-terranian mess that's under the ground for the last 200+ years. my dads company had to put a power line thru the middle of arlington national cemetary and it was a beaurocratic nightmare for 2 years before they could even set foot in the place and another nightmare ensued once the equipment to do it showed up and all the officials and inspectors got a look at them. took 1&1/2 years to do 6 weeks worth of work. this typically happens alot, so this is not a special example, just one most americans can easily understand the hold up. i had a good laugh when obama threw away all that money to get high speed internet going as 50% is going right back to the governments before a single line gets dropped in the ground. it's the regulations that are the biggest hold ups. when it gets to be a priority in the governments eye, they do everything they need to make it happen when they want to if it's a direct benefit to them. all the other telecoms are just looking and waiting to see what happens before they jump on board and invest in the technology. most of them are looking towards an AT&T type solution tho with better satellite technology like global satallite phones.
  • 0 Hide
    f-14 , December 17, 2010 7:54 PM
    sry mikem_90 the split quote i tried to do didn't work and looks like i added more chatter to your words. well now i know that doesn't work!
  • 0 Hide
    mikem_90 , December 17, 2010 10:41 PM
    f-14sry mikem_90 the split quote i tried to do didn't work and looks like i added more chatter to your words. well now i know that doesn't work!


    Cool,

    I wish, Satellite has problems with Latency, Its just too much distance to cover from earth to orbit and back to earth again. I recall some of the sat solutions back in the 90s were doooooogggg slowwww. Ping times of 500ms to 1 second were common. No FPS gaming on that.

    Wireless has a little promise, but you're limited to bandwidth over frequencies, and DSL style performance. Fixed wireless is a bit better, but hasn't progressed beyond DSL type speeds for a while. Plus line of sight issues will be a problem. Ever seen those diamond antennas on big posts on people's roofs? Ugly.

    I do hope that congress lets the FCC do its thing, but I don't hold out any hope. They're currently trying to ride a bill that will restrict the FCC from doing anything on some veterans bill. Sick MFs.

  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 18, 2010 12:22 AM
    And the sad part is that the net is absolutely crucial to the economy, security and growth of a nation. I believe there is an important correlation between our economic growth and internet access. As seen by smaller countries that have wired up in recent decades.
  • 0 Hide
    K-zon , December 18, 2010 2:22 AM
    Google Fiber Pilot City is probably one of interest and a place for ideas to work through without maybe typical issues within IT, A new source of issues to look forward too or a problem to not have to deal with. Of it should at least see it as rather or not a said community doesnt get it, one does. Rather Google should turn itself into an ISP enterprise based off what might be some huge leaps in internet communications should be left to where they are at with it, given Google is known more then for just having an internet connection service. Fiber Optics is probably an investment service to start and run at first. And with Google making many reaches into markets with its name to say. Having Fiber Optics with it is probably just another achievement under its belt with what it already has. And what else it might accomplish once a pilot city is selected and the service is up and running. Once its built and if of any good use for any applications it has been able to build and run and have as a stable means of use, can there be some more viable options. Google ISP might be one based off of fiber optics. This could help bring those prices down. We'll have to wait and find out. Having a fiber optic plan in a city is probably something to look forward too and into. Should see what kind of fiber optics they are actually going to use within a practical means in which normal lines are used. If called normal to say. Idk, still have to wait and see.
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 18, 2010 3:39 AM
    Can you please ban the entire ISP of those schmucks spamming Tom's comments?
  • 0 Hide
    Anonymous , December 20, 2010 3:12 PM
    Most of Western Europe would fit into Texas, a little bit different in size. But, agree we are over regulated (so gov't can make more money). I have fiber to my house, but not in cause that would cost money, I have all the same that you have for $99 (phone, internet, tv). So, not much different.
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