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Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: The ultimate massage gun

The best massage gun for athletes just got better

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)
Editor's Choice
(Image: © Future)

Tom's Guide Verdict

With new on-screen guidance, less sound and an added attachment, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) is a solid update to the most premium massage gun on the market. But the $599 price is still hard to swallow.

Pros

  • +

    60 pounds no-stall force

  • +

    Built-in guided routine presets

  • +

    Quieter than before

  • +

    New Micro-Point attachment

  • +

    Second battery included

Cons

  • -

    Very expensive

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) Specs

Dimensions: 10 in x 7.1 in x 3 inches
Weight: 2.9 pounds
PPM range: 1750-2400
Amplitude: 16mm
Attachments: 6
Noise level: 52-67 decibels
Battery life: 150 minutes (2 lithium ion batteries included)
Battery charge time: 75 minutes

The Theragun is basically synonymous with massage guns at this point, even with several other massage guns now on the market. And Therabody just reminded us why that’s the case with Theragun Pro (Gen 5), the company’s most full-featured massage gun yet.

Anyone at any activity level might find a massage gun helps with warming up, recovering and resting. But it’s serious athletes the Theragun Pro might best be suited for, with the premium $599 price tag delivering premium features the average person might not need. That said, new on-screen guidance and an added micro-point attachment, plus 20% less sound, make the latest Theragun Pro one of the best massage guns you can buy.

Though I can’t overlook the cost, it truly is the only qualm to consider. Power, portability and a long-lasting battery life make for another great Theragun percussion device for penetrating those sore muscle tissues. After using the massage gun for this Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review, I'm here to help you figure out if the high price is worth it for you.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) price and availability

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) costs $599, which is the same price as the previous-gen Theragun Pro. As established, it’s the most expensive mainstream massage gun. The Theragun Elite, meanwhile, costs $399. Besides price, battery life and motor power are the biggest differences between the Theragun Elite vs. Theragun Pro.

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) is available as of September 20.

The company's value pick is the $179 Legiral Le3 Massage Gun. Therabody also sells the $199 Theragun Mini, if you’d like a device from the same brand that comes in a small package.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: Design

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) doesn’t look much different from the previous-gen model. It maintains a triangular shape, allowing for multiple grip options. The device is mostly matte-black with a large, light blue disc at the base of the arm. There’s some subtle texture detail elevating the overall appearance, too. 

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)

(Image credit: Future)

Also like the previous Theragun Pro, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) features an adjustable attachment arm, which is something you won’t get from the Theragun Elite or most traditional-looking, T-shaped massage guns. A button on the thickest part of the handle lets the arm move between four positions, spanning about 90-degrees total. This could help extend percussion to hard-to-reach parts of your body. 

Other familiar features are the small OLED screen and control panel. The screen displays the Theragun Pro’s current speed, applied force and battery status while the control panel is used to make adjustments or start a preset session. I’ll go more into those sessions in the performance section of this review.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)

(Image credit: Future)

As for portability, the Theragun Pro weighs 2.9 pounds and comes with a soft carrying/storage case. It’s a bit too large to toss in my softball bag for a scrimmage, but if I were to travel to a tournament or plan a weekend trip filled with activity, it would be trouble to bring along.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: Performance

The Theragun Pro offers five pre-programmed speeds — 1750, 1900, 2100, 2200, or 2400 percussions per minute (ppm.) The speeds can change with the physical controls on the device, or further adjusted in the Therabody app. By pairing my Theragun Pro to the Therabody app, I could choose from several massage gun routines and sync my usage with Apple Health.

Therabody claims this massage gun is 20% quieter. I measured an average range between 52 and 62 decibels, an improvement over the previous model's 77 decibels.

Previously, you needed the app for guidance on which handle part to hold and which parts of the body you’re supposed to use the Theragun Pro on during a routine. But on the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) there are four presets with visual guidance directly on your device. The presets are Warm-Up, Relax, Recover and Sleep.

While you get the most direction in the app, I appreciated seeing demonstrations without needing to get out my phone, especially for the Sleep pre-set. When I’m trying to rest, I don’t want to risk being distracted by notifications on my phone.

And even when I am trying to rest, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) sound isn’t terribly loud. Therabody claims it’s 20% quieter than before thanks to a new PRO EQ150 motor. I measured an average range between 52 and 62 decibels depending on the ppm, with sound maxing out at 67 decibels. This is actually an improvement over the previous-gen model, which maxed out at 77 decibels.

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) presents a stall force threshold of 60 pounds, and it checks out. Even when I applied as much pressure as I could, the unit kept up its percussion. This is something the Theragun Pro does better than any other massage guns, making it well-suited for strong users with large muscles.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)

(Image credit: Future)

Similarly, the 16mm amplitude remains one of the best-in-class, maximizing the distance that the attachment and shaft travel into your muscle tissues. In other words, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) can deliver an extremely effective massage. As much as my wallet would like to think my affordable Sportneer Elite D9 Massage Gun offers the same results, my various body aches feel so much eased by the Theragun Pro for longer periods of time. 

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: Attachments

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) ships with the Standard ball attachment and comes with five others: a Dampener designed for areas near bones; a Wedge for scraping or flushing percussion; a Thumb that’s ideal for the lower back; a Supersoft for especially sensitive spots and a new Micro-Point attachment designed to target acute tissue pain. 

Theragun Pro (Gen 5)

(Image credit: Future)

Though it’s common for even affordable massage guns to offer multiple attachments, the Theragun Pro’s are especially well-made and seem to actually fulfill their specific needs. For example, I used the Supersoft attachment to assuage a sore kink on the side of my neck, while the Micro-Point attachment offered some temporary relief to my chronic knee pain similar to the effect of acupuncture.

The attachments are easy to swap out with a tug on whatever attachment is currently in place. In addition to the Theragun Pro’s case, you’ll also get a dedicated storage pouch for keeping the attachments all in one place. Certain attachments even feature their own covers to ensure the materials don’t get damaged.

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: Battery life

I used the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) every day for a week for this review, and the battery life is still holding strong at 30%

I used the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) every day for a week for this review, and the battery life is still holding strong at 30% down from 100%. The battery is rated for 150 minutes of use, though that may vary based on the ppm intensity. 

When it’s time to charge, I’ll do so with USB-C charging. Though I won’t need to wait around for the Theragun Pro (Gen 5)’s battery to juice back up. I just need to swap out for the second battery. A second battery is probably something you’d expect from a $600 massage gun, but it’s nonetheless a great convenience. 

Theragun Pro (Gen 5) review: Verdict

The Theragun Pro (Gen 5) is perhaps the most full-featured massage gun on the market, which makes sense coming from the company that made the at-home percussion massager mainstream. After using it for a week, it might be hard to go back to an affordable alternative.

Though for $200 less, the Theragun Elite will remain the best massage gun for most people, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5)'s added perks better justify the premium than before. The on-screen guidance, Micro-Point attachment and quieter motor are true improvements. If you live an active lifestyle and take your recovery seriously, the Theragun Pro (Gen 5) could be a worthwhile investment. 

Kate Kozuch is an editor at Tom’s Guide covering smartwatches, TVs and everything smart-home related. Kate also appears on Fox News to talk tech trends and runs the Tom's Guide TikTok account (opens in new tab), which you should be following. When she’s not filming tech videos, you can find her on an exercise bike, mastering the NYT Crossword or channeling her inner celebrity chef.