LG OLED TVs are up to AU$2,500 off in these ripper Boxing Day deals

The LG C2 OLED TV on a purple background
(Image credit: LG)

We're massive fans of LG's C2 OLED TVs — we love the colour accuracy, with saturation just right, and black levels are simply outstanding. It's a 2022 TV line that suits both gamers and cinephiles.

And while we've seen LG C2s at reasonable discounts, especially during a big sales, they can still stretch your budget a little.

Enter the LG CS OLED TV. This cheaper range of LG OLED tellies is likely to be a one-off special line – but doesn't mean you should ignore them. Far from it. The CS range packs most of the C2's smarts, but at a lower price point, allowing you to either save a considerable sum, or step up to a larger panel without breaking the bank.

Both the C2 and CS are powered by the same α9 Gen5 AI processor, and they both feature LG's Dynamic Tone Mapping Pro engine for superb image rendering. The primary reason the latter CS range is cheaper than the C2 is due to the use of C1 OLED panels from 2021 in the CS — but those C1s are still amazing performers. The CS range also boasts the same connectivity and built-in audio as the C2, as well as the latest ThinQ AI webOS user interface, plus full support for Dolby Vision IQ and Dolby Atmos.

This Boxing Day, though, the discounts on both the CS and C2 range are frankly great, so you can choose whichever you'd prefer, as they've both got massive discounts over at Appliance Central, with up to AU$2,545 available in savings.

LG C2 55-inch OLED TV (opens in new tab)

LG C2 55-inch OLED TV | AU$3,195 AU$2,150 at Appliance Central (opens in new tab) (save AU$1,045)

Nothing short of exceptional, the LG C2 reigns supreme as what is arguably the best TV money can buy. With outstanding OLED picture quality, immersive Dolby Atmos audio and an impressive array of gaming-friendly features, it's worth every bit of hype and more. We think the 55-inch panel hits the sweet spot in terms of size and price, with over a grand in savings, but other sizes are also deeply discounted:
42-inch: AU$2,295 AU$1,599 (opens in new tab) (save AU$696)
• 48-inch: AU$2,695 AU$1,920 (opens in new tab) (save AU$775)
• 65-inch: AU$3,990 AU$3,090 (opens in new tab) (save AU$900)
77-inch: AU$7,995 AU$5,450 (opens in new tab) (save AU$2,545)
• 83-inch: AU$9,995 AU$7,450 (opens in new tab) (save AU$2,545)

LG CS 65-inch OLED TV (opens in new tab)

LG CS 65-inch OLED TV | AU$3,695 AU$2,350 at Appliance Central (opens in new tab) (save AU$1,345)

For a little more money compared to the 55-inch C2 above, you can get the 65-inch version of the CS instead. It doesn't compromise where it's most important — with fantastic performance and image quality — so even if it doesn't have LGs latest OLED panel you are getting a really good set here. 

Other sizes are also available at a discount:
55-inch: AU$2,695 AU$1,590 (opens in new tab) (save AU$1,105)
• 77-inch: AU$5,795 AU$4,345 (opens in new tab) (save AU$1,450)

The C2 might be the ultimate in TV technology right now, but what exactly does the CS trade off in terms of specs? That will be something most users will easily be able to live with.

The CS inherits the older LG C1 OLED TV's frame design and lack hands-free voice control. It's also misses out on the C2's Always Ready mode — this feature lets you turn the display off, but keeps the TV on to receive voice commands, AirPlay or Chromecast requests, or to turn the panel into an artwork display.

Also, the panel used on the CS is the same one used on the LG B2 and C1 ranges, so it lacks the C2's OLED Evo tech that adds 20% more luminance. That said, most users shouldn't really see a difference. The screen still supports a 120Hz refresh rate and comes with four HDMI ports, matching the C2 as a great gaming TV option.

Sharmishta Sarkar

Sharmishta is Tom Guide's sister site TechRadar's APAC Managing Editor, but contributes to several of Future's tech sites, including T3 and Digital Camera World. Her expertise lies in all things photography and ereaders of all shapes and sizes, and she's rather keen on smart home gizmos. In her spare time, she's usually going walkabout with her camera or reading (on an ereader, obviously).